35

Yeah, that advice was super wrong. Moisture encourages mold growth. After a water leak you need to go to extremes to dry the air to get wet things to evaporate into the air, which you then continue to dry. I would run dehumidifiers, or shoot, if your house has A/C, just run the A/C since that is a dehumidifier. The only risk is if you excessively ...


28

Look at it as a start on a foundation hole - but don't get hung up on "making the house the same size/shape as the existing hole" because you can alter the size/shape of the hole when building the foundation, on which you will put your house, of whatever size & shape matches your ideas and budget. You might feel more of an advantage to sticking ...


24

You need a dehumidifier. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dehumidifier If there is no way to blow the humid air out, run it thru a dehumidifier. You can keep it in the bathroom running on a timer or roll it into the shower to run after you wash up, and let the collected water go down the drain.


20

When the things in a bathroom dry the water is not simply disappearing, rather it is converting from liquid you can see and feel on the surfaces and towels into vapor in the air. In other words, visibly wet surfaces are exchanged for palpably humid air. A portable fan will circulate air inside the room and will accelerate the process but it will be hampered ...


20

You asked: Would there be any problem to build the wood house over the hole, so as to cover it? So I am going to make the following assumptions: You would like to personally build the house There is no plan for a basement nor slab You basically plan to build the house on stilts Here are considerations: If you don't want your house to be crooked after 1 ...


16

You are being sold. The evaporator coil in the AC condenses water vapor in the air. It does this by blowing the warm air from your home over the cool evaporator coil. The cool coil pulls the moisture from the indoor air, removing it and draining it from your home via the condensate array. This happens with every air conditioning cycle. If the AC unit can't ...


13

It is possible for A/C to cause mold issues but it depends on a few factors. The problem is this: when choosing a A/C unit for a home, often people (even 'professionals') will assume that bigger is better. The installer plugs in the numbers to the manufacturers model and comes up with a recommended unit size, then bumps it up to a larger one. The problem ...


12

The coil on a good dehumidifier is SIGNIFICANTLY colder than the coil on a typical air conditioner. A typical central AC unit is configured so the air coming off the coil is approximately 20 degrees (F) colder than the air entering the coil, and tends to be somewhere in the neighborhood of 52-55 degrees (F). As the air passes over the coil, water below the ...


11

The simplist solution to dehumidifying in an area with no drain is to use a dehimidifier with a built in pump such as this one: It has a long thin tube that can be routed to an area with a drain (such as a washing machine drainpipe) or to the outside (through a window frame or a very small hole drilled through the wall). If to the outside, you need to ...


9

Don't forget that the percentage humidity is RELATIVE. Cold air cannot contain as much moisture as warm air. For the same amount of water in the air, the relative humidity will increase as the temperature drops. By consulting a psychrometric (humidity) chart, I see your overnight run removed 19 grains of water per pound of dry air. If you rewarmed the ...


7

Dehumidifiers work a bit different than A/C units. While A/C units do remove moisture, as a side effect. They also cool the air moving through them, by moving heat away. Dehumidifiers remove the moisture and cool the air, but then they heat the air back up. If you wanted your A/C system to function as a dehumidifier, you'd have to bring back the heat that ...


5

I am a licensed contractor, home inspector and certified energy auditor. Energy audits using blower doors in conjunction with infrared is ideal for air leakage that leads to heat and humidity loss and increased energy costs. The whole house humidifiers can be very problematic and can shorten the usable life of your furnace. I have been on countless home ...


5

The problem with adding humidity to a leaky home is amount of water vapor air can hold varies significantly with temperature. While 30% relative humidity at 72°F seems dry and harmless in and of itself if you cool this same air to 38°F (let alone -10°F it sometimes get) all of the sudden you have reached 100% RH. The difficulty is making sure ...


5

Trapping the water in the wall is no solution, it will only wreck the wall more quickly. Any paint you put on there will fall off the wall, as it will be pushed off by the water. I use a lot of different paints from LPU to powdercoat. Nothing I know of will do what you want.


5

It's really hard to assure that they won't be under load anytime in the next 50 years. Obviously, the bottles only need to break once to be ruined. Also, depending on the type of bottle, it might be hard to find lids that are waterproof, rustproof, and won't decompose. I recommend using something sturdier, like large diameter PVC or ABS pipe. It's easy ...


5

You don't say where you live but you will get things living down there. Rats, foxes, badgers for example. They will leave faeces and dead stuff. Make sure you have access steps and built-in lighting.


5

Your basement is not nearly as sealed as you think. Which is actually a good thing. You need to constantly have make up air. That is air to replace the air you breathe. Otherwise, while your H2O is going down (thanks to the dehumidifier), your O2 is also going down and your CO2 is going up as you breathe. I am not going to do the math, but just think "...


4

There are two things working together to make water condense on the windows. The house is humid, and the windows are cold (even well-insulated windows will usually be the coldest thing in the house because of the low R-value compared to walls and ceilings). To prevent the condensation, you can remove the humidity or make the windows warmer. Removing ...


4

This question has received a lot of answers and comments, but I suspect not from people familiar with Florida who have encountered the underlying issue. It is a frequent one in Florida because: There are a lot of snowbirds, and Floridians who travel a lot, so houses frequently are unoccupied for long periods. Florida is extremely hot and humid. The ...


4

Yes, it could lead to wood rot and a severe mold problem. Don't do it.


4

With "damp", your enemy is humidity, or water which is dissolved in the air. Warm air can disolve a lot more water than cool air. When warm, water-saturated air moves to a cooler place, it cools the air. The water cannot remain in the air, and must condense, typically on a cool object. A heater raises the air temperature, which temporarily increases ...


4

Most "traditional" electric dryers basically have a heating element, a fan, a motor and a control panel. The motor turns the drum, usually via a belt. The fan blows air past the heating element into the drum. The air then flows out, through the lint filter to the back (or possibly side) of the dryer through ductwork to the outside. Anything can go ...


3

I store flooring in my shed/garage all the time. However, the humidity isn't very high where I live. You should find out the max humidty recommended by manufacturer and verify that it won't exceed that. Also make sure not to store directly in contact with concrete floors as they could absorb moisture through the concrete. For engineered flooring I would ...


3

It's likely functioning properly. A setting of 6, probably correlates to 40% relative humidity. According to the Owners Manual Your Aprilaire Automatic Humidifier, is a high precision system that will accurately maintain the relative humidity in your home to a maximum of 45% RH and a minimum of 10% RH. If the home is at a higher relative humidity, ...


3

Yes, the tile joints do let water pass. The grout is porous, and additionally does not seal tight with the tiles as it ages (causing it to actually pull some water in via capillary action). Many tile materials are not waterproof either. Bathroom tiling is only "waterproof" in the sense that it is a finish material that will not be damaged by water. It does ...


3

Air conditioners need to be sized to the room they are in. The dehumidification process takes some time, so if you have an air conditioner that is more powerful than the room calls for, the compressor shuts off before the dehumidification takes place. A 5000 btu unit is considered appropriate for a room 100 to 150 sq. ft. That is a pretty small room, but if ...


3

No, a separate dehumidifier is not better. It simply does not have the airflow of the AC. Running the central AC at 72 for an hour or two in the morning is a good idea to remove the moisture from the air.


3

Humidity is variable everywhere. I live in the desert where the indoor humidity varies from 10% to 60% depending on the time of year. I've installed engineered hardwood and it's totally fine. Don't most houses in the northeast have hardwood flooring? I think you'll be totally fine too. Just keep in mind seasonal cycles; if you install during a high-humidity ...


3

While this would just be short term use. If you have natural gas, propane or oil appliances, this could & even would suck noxious fumes into the house which could eventually or quickly kill you. That's the bad news. Other than that, an exhaust fan does, of course, remove heated & cooled air. If you're single I don't see this being a big deal. But, ...


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