35

Yeah, that advice was super wrong. Moisture encourages mold growth. After a water leak you need to go to extremes to dry the air to get wet things to evaporate into the air, which you then continue to dry. I would run dehumidifiers, or shoot, if your house has A/C, just run the A/C since that is a dehumidifier. The only risk is if you excessively ...


20

30-40% in winter. Otherwise below 60% to keep mold away. Or even below 50% to avoid dust mites. You can also see this question: Humidity Levels.


16

I assume you are in a cold climate, like Minnesota (where I am). I will address your question in three parts; the first two have to do with the humidifier. The "winter" setting on the duct in your photo: It appears from the photo that the duct in question goes from your humidifier around to the return (intake) side of your furnace's ducting. This needs ...


16

You are being sold. The evaporator coil in the AC condenses water vapor in the air. It does this by blowing the warm air from your home over the cool evaporator coil. The cool coil pulls the moisture from the indoor air, removing it and draining it from your home via the condensate array. This happens with every air conditioning cycle. If the AC unit can't ...


13

It is possible for A/C to cause mold issues but it depends on a few factors. The problem is this: when choosing a A/C unit for a home, often people (even 'professionals') will assume that bigger is better. The installer plugs in the numbers to the manufacturers model and comes up with a recommended unit size, then bumps it up to a larger one. The problem ...


11

The simplist solution to dehumidifying in an area with no drain is to use a dehimidifier with a built in pump such as this one: It has a long thin tube that can be routed to an area with a drain (such as a washing machine drainpipe) or to the outside (through a window frame or a very small hole drilled through the wall). If to the outside, you need to ...


9

I'd be surprised that you'd have this much moisture from condensation, especially since condensation doesn't change the net moisture level, it's actually removing moisture from the air. Double check for leaks, signs of corrosion on pipes, particularly at the joints, for caulk that is cracking in the showers, and the drain pipes. Edit: One more thought, ...


9

For the ducts, the setting indicates where you should set the switch based on the season. If your house has separate air return ducts on different floors or even multiple ducts on the same floor, changing the setting changes which ducts pull air from the house, allowing lower ducts to suck cold air out in the winter and higher ducts to suck hot air out in ...


8

By the sound of things you must be using the older ballasts with a starter plug. These ballasts cause flickering of the bulb and this constant flickering causes damage to the ballast itself. The ballast has to generate a very high voltage to "spark" the tube. Once the tube is glowing the ballast can relax and give a constant power output. The state between ...


7

Don't forget that the percentage humidity is RELATIVE. Cold air cannot contain as much moisture as warm air. For the same amount of water in the air, the relative humidity will increase as the temperature drops. By consulting a psychrometric (humidity) chart, I see your overnight run removed 19 grains of water per pound of dry air. If you rewarmed the ...


6

You are quite correct about the thermodynamics. The heat involved in a phase change of water is so significant that professional HVAC guys specify the performance requirements for cooling as two different parameters: sensible and latent heat to be removed. The latter is the heat involved in phase change of water and is often more demanding than removing ...


5

Latex paint takes about 24-36 hours to cure in normal/optimal (50%) humidity environments, and longer to dry if your humidity is higher. The easiest way to bring down household humidity in the summer is to leave your A/C cranked down. Your air conditioner will remove humidity from the air. First, ensure that any patching you do has dried thoroughly. Prime ...


5

I believe the answers above are a bit more realistic than others I've seen. Remember if air outside is 60% RH and the temp is 80°F that would be equal to about 75% RH with with a basement temp of 60°F. Keeping it around 55%-60% will be comfortable and obtainable with a decent dehumidifier.


5

The problem with adding humidity to a leaky home is amount of water vapor air can hold varies significantly with temperature. While 30% relative humidity at 72°F seems dry and harmless in and of itself if you cool this same air to 38°F (let alone -10°F it sometimes get) all of the sudden you have reached 100% RH. The difficulty is making sure ...


5

A Hygrometer is used to test the level of Humidity. I'll bet that your levels are very high. High humidity can lead to health issues with mold groth, not to mention it can destroy your home. Things you can do: Vent the dryer to outdoors, a big source of the problem! Add a bathroom vent to the outdoors, not in an attic or other room! Run the fan for 30 ...


5

I think the comment about finding the source is very important - there is a reason it is humid, and unless this is solved, you will never solve the problem only band-aid it, which will cost more in the long run going against the "low-cost" part of this question. The definition of low cost varies person-to-person. Under $100 is low cost to me, but maybe not ...


5

The most likley cause of the moisture is too much humidity. Some solutions: A dehumidifier Fans to vent/move air around (to outside) Increased Insulation in the attic (to avoid a large temperature difference between the ceiling and the attic) Basically the humidity needs to be lowered inside the house. You can get a Hygrometer to measure the humidity to ...


5

Dehumidifiers work a bit different than A/C units. While A/C units do remove moisture, as a side effect. They also cool the air moving through them, by moving heat away. Dehumidifiers remove the moisture and cool the air, but then they heat the air back up. If you wanted your A/C system to function as a dehumidifier, you'd have to bring back the heat that ...


5

Trapping the water in the wall is no solution, it will only wreck the wall more quickly. Any paint you put on there will fall off the wall, as it will be pushed off by the water. I use a lot of different paints from LPU to powdercoat. Nothing I know of will do what you want.


5

It's really hard to assure that they won't be under load anytime in the next 50 years. Obviously, the bottles only need to break once to be ruined. Also, depending on the type of bottle, it might be hard to find lids that are waterproof, rustproof, and won't decompose. I recommend using something sturdier, like large diameter PVC or ABS pipe. It's easy ...


4

Carpet will be cheaper to have installed, but the life time is much shorter than hardwood. Look into strand bamboo. I believe it is much harder than any other hardwood and not as susceptible to humidity. I used it in my house on the most of the main level (about 1,500 square feet) and have been very happy with it. Because it so hard, it is more difficult ...


4

Sealing up the crawlspace vents are the last thing you want to do (IMHO). If anything you want to improve the "natural" ventilation to the crawl space, doing so will (greatly) aid the evaporation of moisture and prevent mold taking hold. A sealed (stagnant air), moist space, is a pretty good environment for mold to take hold and grow (spread) in. If you ...


4

I am a licensed contractor, home inspector and certified energy auditor. Energy audits using blower doors in conjunction with infrared is ideal for air leakage that leads to heat and humidity loss and increased energy costs. The whole house humidifiers can be very problematic and can shorten the usable life of your furnace. I have been on countless home ...


4

You could try lagging the pipes - both hot and cold. This should keep the temperature in the space more constant and therefore reduce the build up of condensation. Another thing to try is to put a second wall between your bedroom wall and the shower pipes. Again the goal here is to keep the temperature behind your bedroom wall more constant and less humid. ...


4

I'd go with either a layer of cork or polyiso rigid foam. Then a floating floor on top. A nearby residential tower actually requires the cork underlay. The rigid foam will work just as well at lower cost. The float floor can be two layers of ply staggered and screwed to each other, or a engineered hardwood product. See also the "Sound Isolation Store" ...


4

There are two things working together to make water condense on the windows. The house is humid, and the windows are cold (even well-insulated windows will usually be the coldest thing in the house because of the low R-value compared to walls and ceilings). To prevent the condensation, you can remove the humidity or make the windows warmer. Removing ...


4

This question has received a lot of answers and comments, but I suspect not from people familiar with Florida who have encountered the underlying issue. It is a frequent one in Florida because: There are a lot of snowbirds, and Floridians who travel a lot, so houses frequently are unoccupied for long periods. Florida is extremely hot and humid. The ...


4

Yes, it could lead to wood rot and a severe mold problem. Don't do it.


4

With "damp", your enemy is humidity, or water which is dissolved in the air. Warm air can disolve a lot more water than cool air. When warm, water-saturated air moves to a cooler place, it cools the air. The water cannot remain in the air, and must condense, typically on a cool object. A heater raises the air temperature, which temporarily increases ...


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