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TL;DR: It is explicitly not to code to exhaust into the attic or to use foil pipe It's a bad idea anyway because it puts smoke, grease and warm humid air into your attic which can cause mold growth 2015 International Residential Code, Chapter 15: M1501.1 Outdoor discharge. The air removed by every mechanical exhaust system shall be discharged to ...


14

They sell inline lint traps, that can be installed along the exhaust vent. This should catch most; if not all of the excess lint, and give you a convenient easy way to clean the lint. The lint should be cleaned often (along with the dryers internal lint trap), to increase dryer efficiency and decrease the chance of fire. Keep in mind, these are ...


12

There are actually two problems, and they are related: Low Power Fan First I found a customer review on the Lowes web site that said: I gave this only three stars as no where on packaging or instructions is there any note indicating this will not work with high efficiency bathroom fans. I spent many hours troubleshooting my Broan XB110L only to find ...


10

That pipe looks like an air intake. All "direct vent" style appliances (high efficiency on-demand water heater, gas fireplace, etc.) have an isolated air intake and it is common to have it suck in air from outside the building so as not to force air infiltration through doors, windows, etc. Indeed, that is ugly. Our fireplace and tankless water heater ...


10

I don't know where you live, but something to consider is that you're dumping warm, moist air into a potentially cold zone. So some of that air can/will condense in there in winter. Since attics tend to be filled with untreated wood, that means you're creating all the necessary conditions for mold to grow. That can potentially negatively affect your home air ...


8

Take it back and get a different timer The stock Lutron MA-T51 does not need neutral; however, it accomplishes this by trickling power through the load. This is fine for large loads, but for low loads, (less than 40W or 0.3A), it causes the repeated on/off cycling behavior you are observing. (This is mentioned in the troubleshooting section of Lutron's ...


7

Your house is more than likely Balloon Framed. Stick and Platform framing hadn't come into being in 1900. In a balloon-framed house, the studs you see in the basement run all the way up to the roof. The filler material is a concrete mixture that was used as a partial fireblock and also to hold the spacing of the studs. You can put a hole through the ...


6

I would completely disagree with your builder. Since it is a new garage, I do see merit in the "build it in" approach. There are two important considerations: how many CFM do you need and what kind of noise level is tolerable? Are you using anything flammable? Water based paints should not be a problem but solvent based paints require special attention. ...


6

The "best" approach is to take the shortest straight path to get the exhaust air out of your house. Generally that's via a roof vent. Check out this answer for a little more info. Your plan A, two bends and out the gable end is fine as an alternative. 10 feet is not a very long way for a bathroom exhaust vent. If possible, use a rigid vent to avoid ...


6

Your flue should always be open when the fireplace is operating. It is a fire and smoke risk to close the flue while the fire is lit. When not burning, the flue should be closed to prevent heat loss.


6

After reading all the questions and answers in the comments (including my own), I think I finally have a good enough understanding of your situation to answer. And the answer is - in your case, fiberglass insulation will help, but you have to be careful about how you apply it. Why? The point of insulation is to create a thermal break that prevents the ...


6

HVAC systems don't exchange air with the outside unless you specifically add an air exchanger. In older houses, this wasn't necessary because they leaked enough that you always got new fresh air coming in somewhere. With newer houses and recently fully renovated ones, the houses can indeed be sealed up so air tight that an air exchanger is necessary. Based ...


6

You have two problems really and you can choose to solve one, the other or both. First is the easier one, securing your doors so they can't be opened by the air. As Gunner mentioned, a ball latch/catch might work however they are designed to allow the door to open with a bit of force. (source: homedepot.ca) Other options include a bolt that you ...


6

IMO, and IME, bathroom fans should always be vented outside. Bathrooms are one of the biggest (if not the biggest) producer or water vapor in your home. When water vapor is trapped is can cause things like mold, mildew, damage to furniture, added difficulty in conditioning the air, and many more. Just because a bathroom vent is not currently vented to the ...


5

I'd recommend venting out the gable. Run a rigid vent from the gable wall to a point near your install, and use a 2' piece of flex duct to connect the fan to the rigid vent. The flex duct makes the bends easy (don't kink it) and allows the fan to be repaired from below in the future. For that length, I don't think you need to worry.


5

Well first, the outlet being at-grade is a no-no for those pest reasons. They don't have to get up the vertical pipe to cause problems; a mouse or bird can nest in there and cause problems. They did it anyway because it was easier to run it down through the crawl space then up to the ceiling (where, if this is your garage, they'd then have to build a sealed ...


5

Your inspector is correct. Air should enter at the soffit, and exit at either roof vents or a ridge vent. With the current setup air could be entering either the soffit vents or the roof vents, and exiting either the roof vents or the ridge vent. Since your soffits are covered with insulation (because there are no baffles), I'd guess that air is entering ...


5

With the solar-powered vent and two static vents being so close together, I wouldn't be surprised if the the solar-powered vent (because it's powered) is pulling most of it's air from the two static vents. You might be able to check this by using toilet tissue, feather, incense smoke or something to determine air-flow direction through the static vents while ...


5

In an apartment building they may have deliberately designed that area to function as a plenum space. That design would -- one hopes -- include selecting/arranging building materials that could tolerate the moisture these fans would pump into that zone. In your house, it's less likely that folks made the appropriate effort. Rot isn't the only issue. At ...


5

The dryer vent and the combustion vent are one and the same. If you try to use the dryer vent for heating you will have two issues, first excess moisture and second carbon monoxide. Gas dryers get their efficiency by directly venting the combustion into the damp clothes which then by the way of evaporation drastically reduces the temp of the heat. It ...


5

No, this is not a code requirement for laundry rooms in dwelling units (at least in the 2012 IBC). In fact, most dryers are essentially acting as exhaust fans when they run because they take air from the room and exhaust it outside.


4

It is possible that the previous dryer was a stacked unit with the dryer mounted above the washer.The general rule for dryer vents is not any longer than necessary.Two concerns I have are the flex hose if you can replace it with an elbow do that if not use metallic flex not the plastic type.The second concern is if you live in an area that sees snowfall ...


4

On the plus side, a 1925 house tends to be fairly drafty. Not an ideal thing if you live in MN, but it can be considered a benefit as it typically means you have plenty of airflow in the home. The main air quality issue in your basement will likely be mildew/mold. That will depend on your climate (is it humid?) and the quality and type of finishing that was ...


4

I tried this approach on my senior project. It is a little tricky, but you find the largest garbage bag you can buy, or any bag, and either a stop watch or better a video camera. If you know the size of the bag 50 gallons in my case. And if you know the time it takes to fill the bag. you can calculate the airflow through a particular outlet. The bag can ...


4

I realize that this is a U.S. reference, but you may be able to find a wall exhaust fan locally similar to this. You need to find a unit that is intended for exposure to the outdoors. Also you may need a cover in the colder months if the unit you find does not have a self closing louver. The one depicted does. If you use 110 voltage and 60cycles, you may ...


4

Duct Tape is good for a lot of things, except duct work! It will eventually dry up and pull away from the heat in the vent. I would bend/dent one of the ends slightly so that it will fit easily inside of the other. Then I'd secure it with proper HVAC foil tape, followed by a clamp around it. Foil Tape (source: homedepot.ca) Metal Gear Clamp (...


4

Because code varies by region, it's difficult to say yes or no to this. Typically you only really need ventilation to the outside if you have a gas range. Often the hoods on top of electric cook tops just recirculate the air inside and don't actually vent outside. That being said, the often have a carbon filter which is handy for removing odors. They ...


4

Is it completely necessary? No I don't think so. As a comment pointed out, you are creating negative pressure. This is good for sealing environments (ie: keep vapors from existing the room in a lab), or even help prevent fire from spreading via halls. However, you will notice some negative effects to. For one, since the air will be pulled in through any ...


4

I'm tempted to say that venting a pantry outside could be a bad idea as I imagine it would be a very attractive smell to rodents who will find their way in. You'd also be forcing conditioned air outside for no real reason which will just increase utility costs. As suggested in the answer by The Evil Greenbo, two passive vents would probably do the trick ...


4

Depending on the structure, the header of the door may be load bearing and you'll be met with a solid block of wood behind the drywall that shouldn't be cut. Drill a small test hole from the inside of the closet first. Otherwise, installing a return grill on each side of the wall is fairly simple. Leave at least an inch or two border to the edge of the ...


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