26

Almost certainly a vent for plumbing. It connects to the sewer, so it doesn't need a cap. It's highly likely there's a sink or other fixture nearly below it.


19

TL;DR: It is explicitly not to code to exhaust into the attic or to use foil pipe It's a bad idea anyway because it puts smoke, grease and warm humid air into your attic which can cause mold growth 2015 International Residential Code, Chapter 15: M1501.1 Outdoor discharge. The air removed by every mechanical exhaust system shall be discharged to ...


12

There are actually two problems, and they are related: Low Power Fan First I found a customer review on the Lowes web site that said: I gave this only three stars as no where on packaging or instructions is there any note indicating this will not work with high efficiency bathroom fans. I spent many hours troubleshooting my Broan XB110L only to find during ...


10

That pipe looks like an air intake. All "direct vent" style appliances (high efficiency on-demand water heater, gas fireplace, etc.) have an isolated air intake and it is common to have it suck in air from outside the building so as not to force air infiltration through doors, windows, etc. Indeed, that is ugly. Our fireplace and tankless water heater ...


10

I don't know where you live, but something to consider is that you're dumping warm, moist air into a potentially cold zone. So some of that air can/will condense in there in winter. Since attics tend to be filled with untreated wood, that means you're creating all the necessary conditions for mold to grow. That can potentially negatively affect your home air ...


10

It's a vent pipe for the plumbing it connects eventually to the sewer. It will catch a small amount of rain but the rain will stay inside the pipe and eventually reach the sewer. You're probably not supposed to put rain into the sewer but this pipe catches such a small amount of rain that nobody cares.


8

Take it back and get a different timer The stock Lutron MA-T51 does not need neutral; however, it accomplishes this by trickling power through the load. This is fine for large loads, but for low loads, (less than 40W or 0.3A), it causes the repeated on/off cycling behavior you are observing. (This is mentioned in the troubleshooting section of Lutron's ...


6

You have two problems really and you can choose to solve one, the other or both. First is the easier one, securing your doors so they can't be opened by the air. As Gunner mentioned, a ball latch/catch might work however they are designed to allow the door to open with a bit of force. (source: homedepot.ca) Other options include a bolt that you ...


6

IMO, and IME, bathroom fans should always be vented outside. Bathrooms are one of the biggest (if not the biggest) producer or water vapor in your home. When water vapor is trapped is can cause things like mold, mildew, damage to furniture, added difficulty in conditioning the air, and many more. Just because a bathroom vent is not currently vented to the ...


6

Sharing ducts in that way usually isn't allowed by code for health, comfort, energy efficiency, and fire reasons, among others. It's not a good idea, as you won't balance venting force without a diverter of some sort, and that means you have to constantly be switching it back and forth for the current need. You're almost guaranteed to forget at times, which ...


5

Your inspector is correct. Air should enter at the soffit, and exit at either roof vents or a ridge vent. With the current setup air could be entering either the soffit vents or the roof vents, and exiting either the roof vents or the ridge vent. Since your soffits are covered with insulation (because there are no baffles), I'd guess that air is entering ...


5

With the solar-powered vent and two static vents being so close together, I wouldn't be surprised if the the solar-powered vent (because it's powered) is pulling most of it's air from the two static vents. You might be able to check this by using toilet tissue, feather, incense smoke or something to determine air-flow direction through the static vents while ...


5

In an apartment building they may have deliberately designed that area to function as a plenum space. That design would -- one hopes -- include selecting/arranging building materials that could tolerate the moisture these fans would pump into that zone. In your house, it's less likely that folks made the appropriate effort. Rot isn't the only issue. At ...


5

The dryer vent and the combustion vent are one and the same. If you try to use the dryer vent for heating you will have two issues, first excess moisture and second carbon monoxide. Gas dryers get their efficiency by directly venting the combustion into the damp clothes which then by the way of evaporation drastically reduces the temp of the heat. It ...


5

No, this is not a code requirement for laundry rooms in dwelling units (at least in the 2012 IBC). In fact, most dryers are essentially acting as exhaust fans when they run because they take air from the room and exhaust it outside.


5

An extra 10 CFM won't hurt you at all.... If anything, it will get rid of the unwanted moisture faster. I'd wager that article was meant for much larger bathroom fans.


4

Bad, bad, bad. Mold will be in evidence shortly in the loft (attic), as we go into warmer weather. The vent must run to the exterior, either through a gable wall or through the roof. Its easier to properly down-slope to the gable wall (to eliminate any condensation in the vent pipe. To reduce pipe condensation (either inside or outside of pipe), a jacket ...


4

I think the ideal solution would be to get casement windows. If the wind blows in both direction (at different times) you could go with a set of casements and open the applicable one: Barring that, I think you need to rig up something that works the same say...perhaps a sheet metal 'vent hood' mounted at an angle. Or even perhaps just a piece of plywood.


4

The point of attic ventilation is to keep the air from getting trapped in what's called the "cold zone" (an ironic term when you're in Texas but there you go...). If an attic cannot breathe well, moisture will get trapped, and lead to term structural deterioration. Temperature isn't a concern - the attic isn't an insulated area - so as long as your ...


4

Agree with @DocSalvage and his thinking - you definitely should remove/seal the static vents. You could also have a problem in that the solar powered fan is so powerful that it draws in air from your ridge vents, which like with the static vents during a summer day would be very hot air. You should get up in the attic and see if you can tell how/where ...


4

It really doesn't make any difference when it comes to lint build up. But you might consider putting a secondary lint trap near the dryer to help reduce the amount of lint trapped in the line.


4

The minimum recommended distance is one inch: Additional spacing of 1" (25 mm) on all sides of the dryer is recommended to reduce noise transfer. The allowable distance seems to be zero inches.


4

Most roofs have intake and exhaust vents. Soffit vents can be used for intake, but they are not the only means of intake. If you have a vented roof and already have adequate intake venting, you don't need to add more. Additionally, not all roofs need to be vented - there are "hot roof" designs where the rafter bays are insulated and sealed up. You wouldn't ...


4

"Insulation" (in the ordinary construction sense) is essentially worthless for blocking sound. But if you need it for the conventional thermal reasons, then certainly go for it. When it comes down to the bottom line, nothing BLOCKS sound except MASS. That means either the mass of objects (like walls and doors) or the mass of air (i.e. DISTANCE). And any ...


4

I think you would want the shower ceiling to be the same height as the rest of the bathroom especially with 8 ft ceilings. An average height man with raised arms would touch a 7 ft ceiling. Who wants that? Everybody wants higher ceilings rather than lower. The only possible benefits of a 7 ft ceiling might be to better confine water vapor and mist to the ...


4

No. In fact I removed the one in my previous home after years of dealing with peeling paint. I'm honestly not sure whether it was a fashion trend or whether folks felt like it kept the shower bay warmer in a chilly house.


4

I'd just get a length of rectangular 3-1/4 x 10 duct, capped on both ends, and connect to it low and high with starting collars. Seal things up nicely with silicone caulk or foil tape. _____ || || <-- end cap __| | . | starting collar in --&...


4

The furnace has the intake and exhaust of a sealed unit but the water heater is an old style open burner. The water heater requires the outside vent. The size of the vent is based on the BTU rating of the water heater. I would not close off the vent because this provides the fresh air for the water heater.


4

Gable end vents were a common approach to attic ventilation decades ago, but those aren't nearly large enough. Gable vents don't provide the airflow that a soffit-to-ridge system does (via convection and vacuum), so they need to be quite large. A vertical loop is much better than the strictly horizontal circuit gable vents provide. A rule of thumb is 1 ...


4

This is the classic "DC electronics guy thinking schematic. Here, you need to think wiring diagram due to NEC 300.3(B) and the eddy currents induced by AC EMF. So wiring routes must be a "tree" topology; no loops or bubbles. All wiring throws EMFs. For steady-state DC power, it's like a refrigerator magnet. Not for AC power; its constant ...


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