44

I think your cracking the floor is a blessing in disguise. Clearly there is water under the tile that needs to be dealt with. I'd start by checking the obvious things like the toilet seal and the bathtub and/or shower drains. But ultimately you're going to want to pull that tile up, dry it out thoroughly, replace any water-damaged materials, and replace ...


10

Your problem is obvious. Moisture is migrating up from the slab. I don't imagine anyone suggested to do a moisture check on the concrete before you started? There are meters that can measure the % of moisture in concrete. With that said, it is never a good idea to put wood or laminate directly on concrete slabs or uncured concrete upper floors. In your ...


10

It’s highly unlikely that “failed” grout would create the refill rate of wet flooring you describe. Most shower failures are generated by leaky or failing plumbing in the wall, behind the tile. I have often seen the water damage extend to the framing, which necessitates cutting out and replacing that portion of framing. Your wet floor problem needs to be ...


10

Call a plumber immediately! This is uncomfortably close to my recent experiences.. My kitchen floor had a damaged tile (similar story, something got dropped on it) and water was welling up from under it when it was stepped on. We thought it might have been absorbed by water seeping into the damaged area, so it wasn't a huge issue, it would dry out, then it ...


9

Get a dehumidifier running in there and see if you can dry it out, you’ll have to stop using the bathroom (if you can) and it might take a while (possibly days) Once it’s completely dry try using one fixture at a time and see if you can isolate the cause. The other posts have given you some good advice and you might end up paying someone to rip up that ...


7

Multi-part answer here: It could be the water table, in which case, there's not a lot you can do. If it's the water table, then you'll have water seeping up through the floor. BUT consider that when they built the house, they dug a bowl in the ground, and then backfilled with loose soil, rocks and whatever other garbage they had lying around. You could ...


7

From a comfort and water protection perspective, I think you'll find it beneficial to install a sub floor. I'd recommend one which allows for ventilation beneath it such as these 2x2 panels you can buy at Home Depot/Lowes Dricore This will give you a nice, warm "softer" surface to put your carpet pad on, and help protect from any condensation issues with ...


7

I have read that an iron can help lift those water marks off the table. If I remember correctly... Lay a dry cloth over the mark Heat the iron with the steam turned off Briefly iron the spot, gradually increasing the length of time you apply the heat I haven't tried it myself, so try it at your own risk.


7

Would moisture be trapped? To some extent. Is it bad? No, once concrete has been mixed and started to cure, keeping it moist helps it get stronger and this effect can go on for a long time. In no case will it ever make the concrete weaker. See the graph at the end of this URL: http://wgbis.ces.iisc.ernet.in/energy/water/paper/drinkingwater/wellsconstruction/...


5

I believe the answers above are a bit more realistic than others I've seen. Remember if air outside is 60% RH and the temp is 80°F that would be equal to about 75% RH with with a basement temp of 60°F. Keeping it around 55%-60% will be comfortable and obtainable with a decent dehumidifier.


5

Well, it rained pretty heavily the entire week while I was working, so I waited a day or two before drywalling to see if I could find a leak. I believe whatever was causing the problem was fixed. I think the mold there was from back when that window used to be a doorway. Here's my fix: The wall was very unlevel, so I went to Lowe's in search of Lath (my ...


5

Ed's suggestion is fine. Another option is to assume it will leak and built to allow it to happen as a rain screen wall. A rain screen wall has a waterproof interior, an air gap, then the exterior siding. Any water getting behind the siding can air dry within this gap.


5

Someone built on rock because the rock was where they wanted to put the house. This mighf reduce foundation cost, too. You repair the foundation the same way you repair any brick or fieldstone foundation -- mortar in new pieces if necessary, tuckpoint to fill in eroded-away mortar, etc. Think of the ledge rock as a natural foundation slab and work from ...


5

You don't need a DIY forum, you need a lawyer or a politician. Your landlord is breaking the law. Good luck getting this resolved!


5

I am going to guess that you have a wood door causing the problem. If you have checked the original installation and frame alignment and feel that cannot be changed, then the only real solution is to plane it down so it closes properly when damp or humid. You can install extra or new weatherstripping to assure it has a good airtight seal,especially in dryer ...


5

How significant of a problem is having the grade above the foundation line? Soil above the foundation means that critters (rodents, worms, reptiles, etc.), bacteria, molds, and water can easily access the siding and infiltrate the walls. Some of these can rapidly deteriorate the structure in a matter of a year or two in contrast to a building lasting ...


4

Probably not the answer you were looking for.You must find the cause and fix the water problem prior to installing any drywall.Make sure everything is dry and moldfree before you cover it.


4

Nope, it shouldn't cause problems with moisture buildup -- but how much blown in fiberglass do you have up there? If it's less than your roof joists, it's not enough, and you should think about adding some (or a lot, actually) to bring you up to R-30 at the least in your attic. If you do have that much up there, but you moved some to the side to put down ...


4

The most common approach to dealing with flooded surfaces is to blow air across them. The constantly changing air absorbs moisture. Commercial companies use very high volume fans, but any fan should help. If you can exhaust the air from the room, the moisture level in the air should drop and more water will be absorbed from the floor. Use of a dehumidifier ...


4

You need vapour barrier (the plastic you put up before drywall) and air barrier. To count as an air barrier you stop air flow by using sheathing tape on: OSB joints and edges Vapour Barrier (this is most common) Tyvek Housewrap seams (becoming more common) Some people think that you only need a vapour barrier or that the vapour barrier is also an air ...


4

One product I know of that is meant for this type of scenario is Dricore. It provides a moisture barrier from the floor. DRIcore has an integrate high density polyethylene membrane bonded to the underside of the panel which provides an excellent moisture barrier I've never used it personally though it seems pretty popular in my neck of the woods. I'd ...


4

Very simple, don't waste $$$ on fancy primers. For new drywall, do not use high hiding or shellac based primers. Use PVA sealer/primer. Amen! See my other answers on primers and sealers.


4

There are two things working together to make water condense on the windows. The house is humid, and the windows are cold (even well-insulated windows will usually be the coldest thing in the house because of the low R-value compared to walls and ceilings). To prevent the condensation, you can remove the humidity or make the windows warmer. Removing ...


4

Insulated slabs usually have vapor barrier underneath. Since you did a test and found no moisture, there should be no problem installing vinyl flooring on it.


3

I would definitely be concerned, mostly about mold but also about property damage (you said it's used for storage) and long-term foundation damage. If your downspouts are not properly discharging water away from your house then you definitely want to address this. In the grand scheme of wet basement solutions, this is probably the cheapest fix you will find....


3

DriCore is a subflooring that is specifically designed for light or occasional moisture. The portion of the product that touches the floor is all plastic and it lifts the upper portion more than 1/2 inch away from the concrete floor. The joints are fairly tight (although not actually sealed). It is intended to allow water to accumulate in the open spaces ...


3

It sounds likely that you might have a minor leak somewhere perhaps. You haven't really mentioned where you live as that can have a big impact on the expected environment in the home. If you in a low lying area and have a basement it could be related to ground water in the area seeping into your basement. More than likely though you simply have a leak ...


3

No, there's no need to install a vapor barrier between two conditioned spaces. The purpose of a vapor barrier is to prevent warm moist air from traveling through the insulation and condensing on the cooler side, which can easily happen in cold climates. With a conditioned space on both sides, you can allow any moisture in the air to pass through. There's ...


3

Any quality primer with mold/mildew resistance.


3

You can put a vapor/moisture barrier up over rigid foam. A lot of new construction in the far north has this as a default. The idea is that you frame right outside of that. In that framing you are allotting a cavity to which moisture can move and evaporate. Now if you are putting rockwool or other types of insulation in your framing then no you do not ...


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