44

I think your cracking the floor is a blessing in disguise. Clearly there is water under the tile that needs to be dealt with. I'd start by checking the obvious things like the toilet seal and the bathtub and/or shower drains. But ultimately you're going to want to pull that tile up, dry it out thoroughly, replace any water-damaged materials, and replace ...


18

Condensing water is never good. The vapor will creep in places where it may not quickly evaporate once it has condensed. It will condense easily but dry slowly in cold places and badly ventilated corners (like around the window) and on a cold floor. That means that these places stay moist for longer than one would think. Take a "finger test" in such places ...


10

Your problem is obvious. Moisture is migrating up from the slab. I don't imagine anyone suggested to do a moisture check on the concrete before you started? There are meters that can measure the % of moisture in concrete. With that said, it is never a good idea to put wood or laminate directly on concrete slabs or uncured concrete upper floors. In your ...


10

It’s highly unlikely that “failed” grout would create the refill rate of wet flooring you describe. Most shower failures are generated by leaky or failing plumbing in the wall, behind the tile. I have often seen the water damage extend to the framing, which necessitates cutting out and replacing that portion of framing. Your wet floor problem needs to be ...


10

Call a plumber immediately! This is uncomfortably close to my recent experiences.. My kitchen floor had a damaged tile (similar story, something got dropped on it) and water was welling up from under it when it was stepped on. We thought it might have been absorbed by water seeping into the damaged area, so it wasn't a huge issue, it would dry out, then it ...


9

Get a dehumidifier running in there and see if you can dry it out, you’ll have to stop using the bathroom (if you can) and it might take a while (possibly days) Once it’s completely dry try using one fixture at a time and see if you can isolate the cause. The other posts have given you some good advice and you might end up paying someone to rip up that ...


7

Not a big problem but moisture is almost never a good thing in a house unless you live in a very dry climate. Why not turn the fan on first thing? In addition to mildew, moisture isn't good for medications, for example. A number of rx medications will state not to store them in your bathroom for that reason. Always better to keep the air moisture low.


5

Ed's suggestion is fine. Another option is to assume it will leak and built to allow it to happen as a rain screen wall. A rain screen wall has a waterproof interior, an air gap, then the exterior siding. Any water getting behind the siding can air dry within this gap.


5

Someone built on rock because the rock was where they wanted to put the house. This mighf reduce foundation cost, too. You repair the foundation the same way you repair any brick or fieldstone foundation -- mortar in new pieces if necessary, tuckpoint to fill in eroded-away mortar, etc. Think of the ledge rock as a natural foundation slab and work from ...


5

You don't need a DIY forum, you need a lawyer or a politician. Your landlord is breaking the law. Good luck getting this resolved!


5

I am going to guess that you have a wood door causing the problem. If you have checked the original installation and frame alignment and feel that cannot be changed, then the only real solution is to plane it down so it closes properly when damp or humid. You can install extra or new weatherstripping to assure it has a good airtight seal,especially in dryer ...


5

How significant of a problem is having the grade above the foundation line? Soil above the foundation means that critters (rodents, worms, reptiles, etc.), bacteria, molds, and water can easily access the siding and infiltrate the walls. Some of these can rapidly deteriorate the structure in a matter of a year or two in contrast to a building lasting ...


5

30 minutes is not an issue as long as it drys out in between. I live in the Pacific Northwest and know such things... You'll be fine running the fan at the end


5

I grew up in a wood house with a wooden bathroom that was well-used each morning. We saw first-hand the effects of rotting wood from moisture. I also rented from landlords that didn't take care of their property, causing black mold to form from excess moisture. The primary concerns are the following: Mold Mildew Rot Hydration of permeable substances Warping ...


5

You can rot your siding wall, or you can change your plan. With vinyl siding, IT probably won't rot, but the sheathing & framing behind it surely will. You either need airspace (not a plastic sheet and dirt) between the bed and your siding, or you need to replace your sheathing & framing with something that won't rot. Building a flowerbed with two ...


4

Very simple, don't waste $$$ on fancy primers. For new drywall, do not use high hiding or shellac based primers. Use PVA sealer/primer. Amen! See my other answers on primers and sealers.


4

There are two things working together to make water condense on the windows. The house is humid, and the windows are cold (even well-insulated windows will usually be the coldest thing in the house because of the low R-value compared to walls and ceilings). To prevent the condensation, you can remove the humidity or make the windows warmer. Removing ...


4

Insulated slabs usually have vapor barrier underneath. Since you did a test and found no moisture, there should be no problem installing vinyl flooring on it.


4

Spray onto a cloth or rag and wipe on. Avoids any overspray if you prepare the cloth/rag away from that area.


3

You can put a vapor/moisture barrier up over rigid foam. A lot of new construction in the far north has this as a default. The idea is that you frame right outside of that. In that framing you are allotting a cavity to which moisture can move and evaporate. Now if you are putting rockwool or other types of insulation in your framing then no you do not ...


3

Any quality primer with mold/mildew resistance.


3

Walls don't need to breathe--people do! What these people mean is that it is important for walls to be able to dry out when they get wet; that they should not trap moisture. This is true, but is only orthogonally related to "breathability." In practical terms, what this means is that in reasonably moist climates, you want a wood-framed house's wooden ...


3

The foam insulation itself is combustible, hence the requirement for a thermal barrier. According to the 2012 IRC: R316.4 Thermal barrier. Unless otherwise allowed in Section R316.5 or Section R316.6, foam plastic shall be separated from the interior of a building by an approved thermal barrier of minimum 1/2 inch (12.7 mm) gypsum wallboard or a ...


3

All dryers need a vent. Gas and electric dryers need a vent to the outside of the house to allow all the moisture to escape from the dryer. All-in-one washer/dryer combo units don't need an air vent, but need a water drain to remove the water from the drying stage (which you need anyways to drain the wash cycle). The walls are irrelevant. So don't worry ...


3

The new information has radically changed my perception of the actual problem. Preventing moisture movement through the foundation won't help. Instead, it is cold temperatures outside causing condensation inside: No matter how well sealed the foundation, the problem will persist. A much less expensive solution may have several parts which can be mixed and ...


3

the plastic will trap moisture in your sheetrock and can cause black mold some areas require hazmat teams for black mold removal, Ran into this a few years ago and it was quite expensive for the home owner.


3

The best way would be to dado the boards so they have a small overlap; some people call this "shiplap". The dado can be done on a table saw and is best with a dado blade set whose width you can adjust. Take ½ the thickness off the face of 1 board and ½ off the back. You choose the overlap from 3/8" to 1" but make them all the same. This makes a ...


3

You don't mention where you live so it is hard to give specific advice. The best suggestion is that if it will be climate controlled, it should be built similar to any other climate controlled structure in your area. That means keeping damp, warm air away from cold surfaces, and building such that the walls can dry if moisture enters them. If you aren't ...


3

The problem is obvious from the picture. The water sheds down that hill right where the house is. There is a house near me that is at the base of a hill and it floods regularly even though mine does not. It is because he is at the base of the hill. To solve the problem, you need to dig a trench between the house and the hill that is deeper than your ...


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