11

Because there will still be a tiny bit of air access and thus water condensation. You want the insulation acting like an inverted bucket, not a bucket that will catch the water and hold it against the pipe. Catching the water will cause metal corrosion, mold, and waterlog the insulation. Making the insulation heavier will also tend to make it want to fall ...


9

You're dealing with a basic fact of nature, water condenses on cold objects, so you need to either remove the water or the cold objects. The windows will typically be the coldest objects in your home since they have such a low R value. Start by reducing the humidity in your home, run exhaust fans in the kitchen and bathroom for longer when cooking and ...


8

Turn on a fan to circulate the air which will remove some of the excess moisture by evaporation. Change the HVAC filter. A dirty filter will impede air flow. Turn on the HVAC. This not only cools/heats the room, but also removes humidity. Get yourself a dehumidifier.


6

When warm moist air comes in contact with a cold surface condensation forms. There used to be these tank liners sold that you would install on the inside of the tank to insulate it. It keeps the outside of the tank from getting as cold to reduce or eliminate condensation. I did a quick search and couldn't find it anymore. I did however find toilet tanks ...


6

Have you thought of a bathroom window film? It's very easy to put there, and it works really nicely. I mean one of these: They come in a variety of patterns, from plain to very fancy. I think they are easier to apply than the sprays (I've put them on couple windows without any problems). They are made to be in the bathroom so they last long, and the ...


6

2*1x or 1*2x would be the same, but 2*1x with an air gap would be better than 2x by itself. Same principal as double pane glass; trapped air slows the transfer of heat.


5

I agree with tootea our breath is a huge amount of the moisture, next showering and cooking, you won't be doing any of that. Turning the heat down will also help you just need to keep things warm, open up cabinets with plumbing and turn the heat down to 50f maybe lower enough to prevent any pipes from freezing but the lowest temp should also help.


5

The short answer is this: it makes no sense for a sealed combustion appliance to intentionally leak exhaust gases to the building interior. There was probably a legitimate reason for the hole to be drilled -- maybe there was a need to measure the pressure inside that pipe to assure the installation was okay, or as part of the troubleshooting of a "blocked ...


4

Condensation occurs when moist air contacts a cooler surface. Adding a storm door will make the inside surface of your front door less cool, and may help reduce the condensation. You may also have excessive humidity from (for example) showering without using an exhaust fan, cooking, etc. I would suggest getting a device that measures relative humdity ...


4

There are two things working together to make water condense on the windows. The house is humid, and the windows are cold (even well-insulated windows will usually be the coldest thing in the house because of the low R-value compared to walls and ceilings). To prevent the condensation, you can remove the humidity or make the windows warmer. Removing ...


4

Very interesting situation. First off, replacing perfectly good vinyl windows is not going to help you from what I see on your pics. Simple weeping drains around windows is not going to help much with all the moisture I see on walls, ceilings and floor. I would suggest you have someone come in with an infrared scanner and make a sweep of the building to ...


4

Probably this is the refrigerant gas return line to the compressor. It will be cold (maybe 45 or 50 F) and water vapor will condense to liquid water on it. It must be insulated and the insulation must be sealed or it will get wet between the pipe and the insulation. Keeping the line insulated will also make the a/c compressor work more efficiently and ...


4

You don't need to take the fridge apart, and most people tend to break the refrigeration system when doing so, so don't. Just run it with the door open. Also leaves it in more salable condition when you tire of the science experiment. To make it more efficient, use a new, not old, refrigeration system. To make it easy, use a dehumidifier, which is already ...


4

Are the walls wet? If not, then a mirror the same temperature as the wall it's mounted on will also not be wet, as the water is not condensing on the walls. If the walls are too cold and the water is condensing on the them, then it will condense on a mirror mounted on them, since that will also be too cold. Constant fogging is primarily a problem (in my ...


3

While it is not a simple solution, one method of ensuring that toilet tanks do not sweat is the use of a mixing valve on the water feed to the tank. These valves mix hot with cold water to feed warm water to the tank. Warm water prevents condensation. The valve only needs to be set once unless you significantly change the temperature of your water heater. ...


3

Short answer. In my experience as an HVAC technician: There is no completely silent condensate pump on the market that Me or my Suppliers are aware of. If there was, everyone would be buying them. There are however certain pumps on the market that are designed to take into consideration sound level. The quietest pump i have ever come across is the ...


3

No. Insulation does not, by itself, cause condensation. Insulation (in conjunction with other factors) prevents condensation.


3

What you’re describing sounds like a combination of negative pressure in the compartment that the drain pan connected to and an incorrectly sized p-trap on the condensate drain. The depth of the t-prap has to be greater than the negative pressure in inches of water column of the compartment where the drain is connected to. A t-prap with insufficient depth, ...


3

I had the exact problem with my condensate drain not draining while running. My unit design is such that the blower pulls air through the A-Coil rather than pushing it through. This design pulls air through the drain pipes and won't allow water to drain. Typical drain configuration utilizes a Tee with a stand pipe so the drain is open above the trap. This ...


3

This sounds like a good candidate for the procedure you outline, done with loose fill cellulose insulation, with two caveats. First of all, while this could conceivably be a DIY project, you can't rent a typical cellulose blower from Home Depot or the like because it doesn't have the power to really densely pack the stuff in there; as a result, the material ...


3

You should wrap the pipes with lengths of foam pipe insulation. Both the hot and cold sides.


3

First, it's worth noting that "wind chill temperature" isn't an actual temperature. It's a way of describing the rate of heat loss as compared to a no-wind scenario. For purposes of this discussion, it's irrelevant. Why does condensation form on the inside of my windows in the winter? If the temperature of the glass is below the dew point inside your home (...


3

Yes. Isolating the pipe from moist air has been the common fix for decades.


3

I'm late to the game, but this is obviously frost due to condensation. Leaks would appear as icicles. I've witnessed this phenomenon personally in very cold climates, and it's often just the result of seasonal changes that leave moist air in place from warmer days. You may have a ventilation deficiency, but there's no evidence of roof leaks here, at least ...


3

1: You state you made a sun room out of your carport ? Just making certain we are on the same page. Here is your problem : Before you enclosed the carport it was exposed to the outside temperatures just like the roof was, now that it is enclosed you have a temperature differential. It is warmer on the underside than it is on the top side. Insulate the roof /...


3

My recommendation would be to run a de-humidifier in the house to control the excess humidity. If you do not want the noise in the living space as I did not then I would put the de-humidifier in the basement. You should open 2 registers in the basement and have at least 2 floor level return grills to circulate air in the basement. Set the de-humidifier at a ...


2

I don't see that there's anything wrong. Condensation happens... on any surface that's colder than the dew point of the adjacent air. If anything, it's showing that it was worth doing. Despite only being a few mils thick and easily heated, it's much colder than the inside air due to heat loss through the windows. Without it, the windows would be sucking heat ...


2

I had the problem here in NE Ohio. Had the ancient furnace replaced with a energy efficient one. The guys installed it, took the old drain line and reconnected my new furnace to it. The frigid cold weather arrived and bingo, came home to a wet carpet and the condensation pump screaming up a storm. I do not have a drain next to the furnace. Well, I called ...


2

It depends on ownership and what you're allowed to do under your rental agreement, but this was the solution on our house. It's stick built 2x4 construction, you didn't say what wall construction is used, so it may not apply. Same situation, north facing, cold corner, black mold growing in the plasterboard surface and paint about 4 inches back from the ...


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