16

Overloads don't trip a GFCI. Period. If there was an overload, it would trip the actual circuit breaker. Since this is a GFCI/receptacle (as opposed to a GFCI/breaker) and the GFCI trips, that is a GFCI problem - 100% - and not an overcurrent situation. 14 AWG raises the question of the size of the breaker. If it is 15A then everything is good. If it is 20A ...


13

The fleas are most likely lying dormant (deep) in the dirt floor, below where the bombs/sprays will get to. Couple/few options: Pave it. Soak the floor 2' down with a chemical like bleach. Diatomaceous Earth. Number 1 is most permanent, #2 is dangerous as all get-out (and probably illegal), whereas #3 is cheap and safe. Diatomaceous earth is (basically) ...


12

"allow the dirt to breathe" doesn't even sound like an urban legend. Just sounds plain pointless. The entire point of the vapor barrier is to keep the moisture out of the crawlspace--so leave the barrier there. The dirt will be OK.


11

My house has the main electrical come in below grade (built in 1967 before they knew better). I would get some small leakage coming in around the conduit where it came through the concrete and later hydro-static pressure pushing water right up into the main breaker box which, though inside, was also below grade. With a un-floored crawl space, some water ...


6

Unfortunately I have to work in crawl spaces a lot. I don a cheap Tyvek jump suit/coveralls with a hood over my regular clothes. You can find them in the paint dept of Lowe's or HD for about $20. I also wear boots, mechanics gloves and some safety glasses. There are always some bugs, spiders, and I've met a woodchuck or two. Take a good flashlight and ...


6

Coal (especially in cities above a certain latitude) was stored under houses, often delivered down a chute to be handled as little a possible as it is messy & dusty.The cost of removing the leftover coal (an unpleasant job) far exceeded its value, so it stayed, often getting covered up later to stop the dust. Heating oil & tanks today face a ...


6

No, at least not under the international residential code (IRC): M1501.1 Outdoor Discharge The air removed by every mechanical exhaust system shall be discharged to the outdoors in accordance with Section M1506.3. Air shall not be exhausted into an attic, soffit, ridge vent or crawl space. And more specifically: M1507.2 Recirculation of Air ...


5

There are thousands of species of mold known to Science, with different species being found in different parts of the world. There isn't any one "crawlspace" mold or "air duct" mold, it's just whatever spores of whatever species happened to take a foothold there. Which one is more dangerous will depend on the particular species of mold and the sensitivity ...


5

You have two issues to contend with. First is that 16 feet is just a bit too tight for two floors. Sure, we usually use 12 inch beams but that's just the structure - you need an actual floor on top and usually a ceiling below. Even if we ignore building codes we will still produce two rather cramped levels. Second is what's actually holding the other end ...


4

Sealing up the crawlspace vents are the last thing you want to do (IMHO). If anything you want to improve the "natural" ventilation to the crawl space, doing so will (greatly) aid the evaporation of moisture and prevent mold taking hold. A sealed (stagnant air), moist space, is a pretty good environment for mold to take hold and grow (spread) in. If you ...


4

Mold detection and identification can be done in two ways. Visible mold can be collected on a test tape, and air borne spores can be collected with an air sample kit. Either way, samples must be sent to a lab for microscopic inspection and ID. Mold and mold spores can range from common everyday varieties that rarely have negative effects on humans to very ...


4

You don't seal the vents, ventilation of the crawlspace is needed to prevent moisture buildup and rot. I had to take on the very same project. There are three objectives. Under house air can have mold in it, you shouldn't be breathing it, block all air exchange between the living space and the crawl space. Under house moisture levels must be brought down ...


4

It is a good idea to seal any apertures between the crawlspace and the main house. If you have to rely on caulk and spray foam you're probably in a situation where the house has some weird structural problems - that is, you should not have giant gaps between the crawlspace and the floor above in any normal construction regimen. It is not a good idea to ...


4

It is a common practice to patch seams and holes in the vapor barrier with tape. The type of tape you need is often called house wrap tape. You can get it at your local home improvement store. If you use the correct tape, then you shouldn't have any issues with it.


3

I think this deserves to have an engineer take a look and give you an opinion. Removing a large portion of the foundation is not something you want to mess with without a plan. Plus if you're going to bother to do it, you might as well make it a real door so that you can actually get boxes in there or something. As an alternative idea, it might be easier to ...


3

What you want to do, may not be the best idea. Typically networking equipment (and more generally electronic equipment), is best installed in a conditioned space. Ideally, you'll want a clean, climate controlled location. A crawl space generally does not fit the bill, and may be the exact opposite of the ideal location. Some of the features of the ...


3

I've found some good guides about this, so I'll share them here. I won't be accepting this answer, so if anyone else has something to add, please do. The US EPA publishes a guide on mold remediation in commercial buildings, much of which seems applicable to residential buildings also. The guide recommends three methods to clean wood surfaces smaller than ...


3

It sounds like you already have a couple of experts working with you. Without seeing the proposed new space, I can only speak to a couple of your concerns. There is no easy way to install a sub slab vapor barrier without removing the old slab. You do not want to sandwich plastic between the old and new concrete if you are going to only put in an inch or so ...


3

assumptions from what's in your photo: 1) it looks like the right side of the opening is your access, and the ducts are rigidly installed. 2) the crawlspace looks unheated, as the ducts seem to be insulated, and the fact that you mention radon must mean you have an actively vented (fan) crawlspace to evacuate any radon gas (along with a radon alarm in ...


3

Varies with climate/temperature and specifics of the faucets/plumbing. We've had heated basements for a long time, so nothing all that new here. If they are frost-free sillcocks, probably nothing is needed, but you'll save a bit of energy and add some insurance with an insulated cover over the outer part. I have seen these freeze in a heated basement under ...


3

Jacking buildings looks simple, but can be complex. I've done quite bit of it for a non-professional, but I happen to be related to a Licensed Professional Civil Engineer who directed the work I've done. As a brash youngster I often could not quite see why we had to take it so slowly - as a somewhat more experienced adult I grasp the fact that you can break ...


3

I have seen this done in our area to keep the pipes from freezing and the floors from being cold. On the homes that do this they usually plug the foundation vents for the winter. Many years ago electric heat was super cheap so this option was less expensive than insulating everything. Most places have gone back and insulated the floors and pipes then closed ...


3

Sure you can fix this, but I wouldn’t opt for the “shelf” idea. Typically, in a post and beam foundation, all loads are transferred directly to the soil. Installing a “shelf” will put thrust on the foundation wall. Obviously the foundation is marginal and I doubt the wall is designed for any horizontal thrust. You’ll be pouring several “pad” footings, so ...


2

Thanks for the input. I will be draining to a 4" drain line which will cross the yard to a ditch where the dishcharge will then be carried on down the line. And I will be using a core bit to drill a hole through the block and brick foundation. I like to keep everything neat and professional looking. I am using another type of pipe which is also gravel ...


2

After you have done the wash, paint the floor with Drylok. In your case it would be best to use a economy grade paint sprayer given the roughness of the concrete. It will seal out the moisture (mold's happy place), and it will also keep out the bugs and plant roots in most cases. Yes, the ultimate solution would be to chip out the old floor and install a new ...


2

Knee pads. Without them you'll be in great pain.


2

I am also in the Northeast and have had to tackle this type of situation a few times. There are several ways to attack it. In your case, the best solution, but unfortunately the most expensive would be to use an open cell foam kit to fill the joist bays. They are fairly easy to use and give you about an R-4 rating per inch. They are a two tank kit with a ...


2

This might sound like a sissy but if you have as motorcycle helmet with the overalls and thick gloves you can rest easy that way. Some tape from the helmet to the overalls to stop the spiders from biting your face. You'll feel invincible down there. a couple layers of clothes under the overalls. You won't even care about rats then either. The only think ...


2

Mandatory: Eye protection. Plastic safety glasses or something like that to prevent dirt getting into your eyes. Dust mask or respirator. You don't want to breathe in the dust/bad air in that area. Recommended: Headlamp. This allows you to see much better in there and both hands to work with. When I go into crawl spaces I use old clothes and sneakers ...


2

There's nothing wrong with fiberglass insulation beneath the floors. It will be, most likely, the most cost-efficient solution. If you have a situation where critters like the insulation, well you have a vented crawl space! Critters get in there. If you have an issue where the insulation gets moist and sags, the problem is not the insulation, it's a ...


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