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4

There doesn't appear to be an electrical junction box in there so no, it's not safe. You will need to add junction boxes and use appropriate connectors for the cables into the boxes and then cover with cover plates. The boxes will have to remain accessible. Or You can work backwards from here and find the connection points for these cables and disconnect ...


4

This depends on the particular house - both how the plumbing is laid out (are water pipes located in exterior walls, or not?) and the relationship between heat delivery and plumbing. It may also depend on the heating system - i.e. hot water baseboards often have pipes that run in poorly insulated spaces at the edges of the house, and can themselves freeze ...


3

Let's explore what can be done with series combinations. We'll begin by working out the resistance of each of the elements. V=IR and P=VI, so P=V^2/R and thus R=V^2/P. The 800W element is 72 ohms, the 1200W is 48 ohms, and the 2000W is 28.8 ohms. First, to directly answer your question, could a resistor be added in series with that 2000W element to make it ...


3

Aside from what Jack says, and even if this was inside a junction box, those wire nuts are wholly inadequate to insulate the wires. Wire nuts are not listed to cap a single wire, and will easily fall off. Ordinarily I would say you need to double them back over and tape them firmly to the (individual) wire so they can't fall off, but you have left yourself ...


3

Your gauge is certainly not reading pressure. The only thing pressure tells you is what temperature the propane is at (LPG is "liquified propane gas" and reflects the fact that propane is easily transported in bulk because it becomes a dense liquid rather than a gas a relatively low pressure. That pressure varies with temperature.) So, there's probably a ...


3

I don't believe anyone can provide a solid numerical answer to this question. We can all provide guidelines, advice, and considerations. There are far too many variables to consider to give this one mathmatical answer. I have heard of hundreds of cases of peoples pipes freezing when they have their heat set in the 60's. (not sure I have heard of it ...


2

If you're so keen to reduce heating costs, apply heat tape then insulation to all your piping that is anywhere near a cold wall, and then lower your thermostat. The cheap tape is readily available at any hardware store, and is stupid; it just heats the pipe the same at all temps. The good tape is available at industrial supply and is self-regulating, ...


2

Keeping an unoccupied building heated or cooled is always wasteful, unless you're up against some sort of environmental boogeyman like pipe freeze or condensation. The idea that "it costs more to cool it down/reboot/etc." is pure bunk. It does not take a half gallon of fuel to start an engine. PC's do not surge 5000 amps during the 30 seconds of startup. ...


2

The engineering theory is that a greater differential in temperature causes a faster loss of energy, so maintaining a constant temperature is more costly. This theory was proven by tests of Twin Homes by The Canadian Centre for Housing Technology. Several papers have been written about studies at these homes, here is a rather thorough one https://www....


2

Get another 2000W unit. Seriously. Place it where practicable and useful, and place it in series with the existing 2000W unit. Together they are now individually 500W units, and 1000W together. I believe that's the number you wanted to hit. I mention this because resistive heaters are naturally perfectly inexpensive. Talking about for-permanent-...


2

You'll need to use both a transformer and relays. Some relays have built-in transformers, but the transformers don't necessarily have the "oomph" to run both the relay and the Nest. Transformers are about $13 and come in a variety of form-factors. Relays also. In most such installations you will have freedom as to where to put the Nest; it doesn't ...


2

Many points have already been mentioned, here is some supplement: Emptying metal pipes for a longer time period is a way to destroy them. A much faster corrosion from inside may start, since the residual water can easily react with the exposed metal and the steady delivering of oxygene in the air inside the pipes. The water inside a closed heating system ...


2

Floor heating systems are very slow and normally meant to run 24/7 except for long time absense > 3 days, if the building hull is insulated to some extent or if it is a huge building with high volume-to-surface ratio. Do the neighbours have the same problem? Which floor is it? How many outside walls does this flat have? What is below the floor, what is ...


2

@PhilippNagel pointed out the hold function, which is fine if you want a constant temperature 24/7. I think your question is more of having fewer than 4 periods per day. You cannot. What you can do is have two or more consecutive periods set the same temperature. This is the closest you can get.


1

If you're looking for the thermostat to just hold a certain temperature and just ignore the day/time setting, you're looking for the HOLD feature. It is described on page 5 of the manual you linked: HOLD TEMPERATURE — The thermostat can hold any temperature within its range for an indefinite period without reverting to the programmed temperature. ...


1

The amount of time it takes to raise the temperature depends not only on the inside and outside temepratures, but also the wind, rain or snow, even humidity makes a difference. I would not overcomplicate this. I would just set the programmable thermostat to say 60* while the house is empty, and raise it to 72* an hour before you get home. The heat will ...


1

I've been involved with many efficiency studies about this during my years with the power company. All of them came up with the same results, more efficient to start heating/cooling one hour before coming home. In all cases, the units ran more when set to heat/cool all day. It was even more efficient if the first one home turned on the unit. This wasn't the ...


1

High probably you have non-insulated pipes or components in the area of the vent system. If you do not want completely and professionally remounting the hot water pipe, you have various ways to reduce the heating of the air: Insulate the hot water pipe as much as possible. There are suitable foamed insulations that can be easily pushed over pipes. But you ...


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