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10

Summary... 100% add the duct work. It will be cheaper in long run, look better, and will increase resale value of the home. Few things here: Once you add those walls/ceilings (given it is not a drop ceiling) adding duct work will be very costly and messy. This is sort of like running ethernet cable throughout the house, but air ducts probably have ...


7

TL;DR Space heating doesn't make sense in a typical US house that already has duct work in place. There are, broadly speaking, 3 types of home heating in general use in the US: Fossil fuels - Natural gas (generally most cost effective) or oil. If you have this, it would definitely be forced air, as that matches "duct work". Electric resistance ...


5

One thing you could consider would be to install dampers in the duct work to close off various legs of duct. This would allow you to have heat available anywhere in the house you want, but to close off areas from heating when you don't want them to be heated. This would, effectively, give you multiple zones, though they'd be manually controlled. Also, adding ...


2

At least a screen is definitely a good idea. The open duct provides the perfect highway for rodents and other critters to enter your home.


2

Yes, it can be done. It just needs to be plumbed (and wired) right. Each thermostat should control a valve that admits hot water to its section of the house. The boiler should be wired to fire up whenever either thermostat is calling for heat. For example, if the basement is cold, but the rest of the house is warm, then the valve allowing water to the ...


2

Simply set your thermostat to "fossil" or "gas/oil" mode Most thermostats out there support what you describe, as it turns out, as gas furnaces control their blower automatically by default, and only use the G terminal as an override to turn the blower on when the system is otherwise not running. So, simply set your thermostat of choice ...


2

It depends if your "heating bill" already includes heating the basement. If you have forced air heating or cooling with the basement on the same zone as the living area, it should make no difference because the air is already circulating and mixing. If you heat your basement and it's on a separate zone, your bill might go up as the zones will not ...


1

The answer is yes, you can. You could ask why your system isn't working that way. You could start by looking at whether it seems to generally be intended to work that way, in which case something is wrong. If your system is meant to have two zones you should see the hot water pipe that comes out of the boiler split into two pipes, and each one should ...


1

In theory, door open/closed of a well insulated basement does not really affect the heating energy consumption of the house. However, there is a subjective element that could cause you to heat more. Even if the heat bill stays the same, you might find it colder in the basement, with the door open/absent: with an open/absent door, cold air from the main level ...


1

I wish I could post this as a comment rather than an answer, but pictures aren't supported in comments, but here goes. This isn't a product recommendation, just an example of what might work for you. Most sophisticated thermostats have a LOT of settings for various types of heating/cooling configurations. I have in-floor hydronic heating and A/C on the ...


1

To me it sounds more like bearings in the fan are going out. Or a bad electrical connection. Surges that would cause a motor to jump around would blow just about every electronic device in the home up. A motor that had bearing problems may spin up and when the bearings get hot start stalling or moving around. If the motor was drawing two much current it ...


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