Hot answers tagged

57

Move It! As already noted by some others, moving the dryer to the wall where the vent ends is a great idea. The location for a gas dryer needs three things: Vent - Absolutely perfect. While you're at it, since it will be a short distance, splurge on some rigid metal ductwork. For a short length it doesn't cost much, and it is much less vulnerable than the ...


51

I don't like the "OMG" abbreviation and seldom use it, but in this case OMG! It would have been bad enough to vent an electric dryer into a crawl (lint, moisture, fire danger), but to vent a gas dryer into a crawl is unconscionable. Gas dryers vent carbon monoxide. It interferes with your body's ability to transport oxygen. If that seeps into the house it ...


38

In general, no you can't do this. I suppose it's possible that the manufacturer uses many of the same parts between their gas and electric models and you could buy enough parts to do a conversion, but this would likely cost more than just buying an electric dryer in the first place. But I've never seen a supported conversion kit - my advice: sell the gas ...


26

I bet if you go to your service panel, you're going to find a completely full service panel, and a unique creature we call a "double-stuff breaker". Quite likely the landlord does his own electrical work or pays a dumb handyman (naughty naughty). He's out of space in the panel, so he resorted to those double-stuffs. He moved the dryer from a 2-pole ...


20

Perhaps a leafblower (or two?) might clean it out a bit? Also maybe get advice on how to make the outside vent area fire resistant if the tube does catch fire.


20

Electric. Heat pump based. Condensing. Dryer. Duct disposed off, vent sealed for good. Depending on where you are, it may be way cheaper (heat pumps are quite efficient) in terms of gas/electricity bills. It may be somewhat more expensive if the gas is less than 1/4 price of the electricity per btu or kWh It requires no ducts. It doesn't vent anything. It ...


16

Electrical Distribution In the United States, most residential electrical service is what's known as a split-phase system. Which is a 3 wire, single phase system. The service entrance cable consists of two ungrounded (hot) conductors, and one grounded (neutral) conductor. Once at your house the grounded (neutral) conductor is bonded to earth, and a fourth ...


15

First, what you do not want to use is duct tape, the adhesive fails under the extreme temperatures. For dryer vents and HVAC ducts, you should seal seams with a foil backed tape. This is designed to be airtight and handle the temperature swings that would cause other types of tape to fail. Note: sample product image, no affiliation or recommendation for ...


15

Replace the unit I would replace the unit to a condenser type dryer. They produce water instead and require no vent. Some units put the water directly to the drain or you can use a tray you have to empty regularly. I dont think you can get gas condenser units, so energy costs may be higher depdending on your location.


14

What you are doing is done all the time, and there is no problem with it, if done properly. The fact is these 3 prong receptacles still exists in many older homes, and there is no requirement to upgrade an entire circuit simply to plug in a device. If you go out and purchase a new electric dryer, the seller will ask if you have a 3 or 4 prong receptacle. ...


14

Switch the cord, not the socket You have a proper NEMA 14-30 dryer receptacle with a ground wire, which is good. However, your "new" (old) dryer has a 3 prong (NEMA 10-30) cord. This can be rectified -- get a 4 prong (NEMA 14-30) dryer cord and install it on the dryer in place of the existing cord, making sure to remove the neutral-ground bonding jumper ...


14

Not an immediate danger, but quite a few problems According to the spec sheet, this dryer is rated for 240V, 30A. Running it on "120V outlet" in the US normally means either 15A or 20A. Thanks to Ohm's law, if you run it on a 20A circuit you are probably safe. If you run it on a 15A circuit, there may be a safety issue. But in any case, there are ...


13

DO NOT connect the ground wire to the grounded (neutral) conductor, as this could lead to current flowing through the body of the dryer (and potentially through you). The installation guide for the dryer will have wiring instructions for both 3, and 4 wire configurations. Check the manufacturers documentation for proper wiring, but I would say the first ...


13

Effective June 29, 2015, all GFCI receptacles and circuit breakers must have an auto-monitoring (self-test) feature that automatically conducts a periodic internal test to confirm that the GFCI is able respond to a ground fault. If a problem is detected, the GFCI must trip and deny power or provide a visual and/or audible indication. Green Status Dual ...


13

I've used the following method to make obnoxious sounds coming from home appliances and toys much quieter: Find where the sound comes from. Usually there's a little grill or perforated plastic that covers the loudspeaker or piezo inducer. Tape over it with a transparent office tape. I sometimes do two layers in cross-hatch pattern if sounds are very loud. ...


13

One possibility is that the two hots, labelled X and Y, are on the same line or leg of the service. The 240V electrical service typical in the US is a three wire Edison circuit, with two of the service wires, commonly called the legs or lines, designated L1 and L2, are at 240VAC at 60Hz, with the neutral tapped midway between the two - 120V L1 to N and ...


12

You're mixing grease with lint, which is only going to make a mess and clog up in no time. You could also create a situation where dryer exhaust goes back into your house instead of outside, causing excessive humidity and a mold/mildew risk. The workaround for that would be to install dampers, but those would likely get jammed with the grease/lint ...


12

As George Anderson's answer says, this is extremely unsafe and must be fixed. But don't try to fix it by making expensive modifications to your home. Gas and electric dryers are inefficient anyway, and it would make a lot of sense to replace the gas dryer with a heat pump dryer (which doesn't need a vent). Heat pump dryers operate like a dehumidifier, using ...


11

You are not grounding, and this can kill you I have no idea why you think 3-prong sockets are new. They are obsolete and dangerous. They are "exactly what they look like": the 3-prong outlet omits the ground, and the 4-prong outlet adds the ground. Any problem with the neutral wire will result in the dryer frame being energized at 120V. Touching that ...


11

Add both a secondary lint trap and a dryer duct booster fan. Fantech and Tjernlund are a couple brands to help you start your search. Also, replacing any easily accessible flexible duct with rigid ducts can help prevent lint from building up. Finally, check that the exhaust louver/vent cap outside isn't filled with lint too. Sometimes contractors use ...


11

Sometimes you read something and can't help but shake your head. The answer is no, they wired the dryer wrong. The ground wire is supposed to wire to the ground lug of the dryer as shown in the manual on page 15. The ground on the dryer needs to be wired correctly to provide safety for anyone who touches a metal surface if a short in the electrical system ...


10

Dryer vent air is full of water vapor and dust. I wouldn't want to blow it into my house. I do not know how much heat (BTU's) a dryer outputs during a run but it seems like it would be a small amount, and of course most people don't run their dryer very often - maybe a handful of times a week.


10

Manufacture mentioned there is no way to silence sound. Inspired by Haimg's advice, I disconnected one of pins from the speaker module off of the components board.


10

The best thing is to use rigid ducts instead of flexible ducts. A little harder to install as you have to figure out (and possibly do some cutting) exactly what pieces to use for your specific installation, and typically you need to attach several pieces together instead of one long tube. But avoids a lot of the issues of lint collecting inside every "...


9

Assuming this is in North America, No, you can't plug an electric dryer into a regular plug. An electric dryer requires 208-240 volts and possibly as much as 30 amps of current, and a standard plug supplies only 110-120 volts and 15-20 amps. You will need an electrician (or knowledgeable acquaintance) to run high-current wiring and install the correct plug ...


9

Strangely, page 26 of the manual mentioned in the question says the following: Does that not work, or only apply to some subset of this model? Maybe there is some trick to get it right (sometimes these translated messages lack certain clarity). I would guess that it probably resets if power is lost. I would not recommend physically cutting any wire to ...


9

In my personal opinion, this type of duct is NEVER a good idea for a dryer vent. Lint sticks to the inside much more than smooth metal. It's virtually impossible to clean effectively, without damaging the duct. How long do you think it will last (contain the flames) when the lint inside catches fire? Solid, smooth metal is the only sensible choice. ...


8

No. It has to be rigid metal pipe in the wall. Plastic pipe is a fire hazard. Note that you cannot use screws to attach together metal pipe for dryer vents; lint can collect on it and become a fire hazard.


8

Without being able to see the cables as they enter the cabinet; or the ability to touch or trace them, here is what I assume is going on. Definitions: Grounded (neutral) from the service A typical single split phase service is made up of 3 wires. Two ungrounded (hot) conductors, and one grounded (neutral) conductor. The ungrounded (hot) conductors will ...


8

There is a problem with the neutral wire. I would start by making sure the screw in the breaker box to the dryer's neutral wire is secure, and that the wire is mechanically intact by firmly wiggling it at the neutral bar end. Also, the neutral bus in the main breaker box should be bonded to ground—usually by a green screw like this: Check the ...


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