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36

PLEASE seek professional assistance immediately. There are two main issues with exhaust that can make you feel ill like this: Carbon Dioxide and Carbon Monoxide. Both are harmful, if not fatal, if the percentage present in the air you breath is too high. You DESPERATELY need to install a carbon monoxide detector, and contact your local housing authority. ...


10

Although not an answer different from the others but I'd like to point out, and considering its importance in this case, it probably can be tolerated in an answer of its own rather than buried somewhere among comments: on your way home today, not tomorrow or next week but today, pass a reliable hardware store in your neighborhood and buy a CO detector and ...


7

Seek medical attention immediately, and have the doctors provide a report on your health and diagnosis. Find out from them how dangerous it is to continue to expose yourself and your family to those fumes. After that, you have a few options, you might try one or more of them in parallel depending on the report itself: Provide copies of them to your ...


6

If the fan has a pull chain as well as the remote the pullchain MUST be on high speed. The remote control only slows the fan down. Bottom line is no, you cannot re-wire a ceiling fan like this to make it go faster.


6

Generally speaking, you don't want to have a fan/light - or more specifically, a light - on GFCI because if the GFCI trips due to something else on the circuit then you are in the dark. As I understand it (I am not an electrician, but I have seen other questions on this topic and I heard this from my own electrician years ago when he installed heat/fan/light ...


5

From the perspective of a motor, a GFCI looks exactly the same as any other circuit breaker. The only difference is that a GFCI has extra circuitry which senses an imbalance between the black and white wires (plus control circuitry to trip the breaker)—nothing more. Many modern ceiling fans seem to be cheaply made. I suspect the failure is a quality ...


5

Don't do it. Plugging the fan into 220V will draw twice the current and result in 4 times the power delivered to the motor, so it will spin like crazy. There is risk of overheating, fire, fan blades dislodging and bearings overheating. In some cases the motor can be rewired for a different voltage but it takes a fair bit of experience and knowledge to do ...


5

Light dimmers are designed to drive loads that are largely resistive in nature like light bulbs. They are generally not compatible with loads that are inductive. Most, if not all, AC motors are inductive type loads. That said, whether a dimmer switch will work safely with your fan or not depends entirely upon the type of motor on the fan. There are some ...


5

Some motors have a start up noise, and is normal for that type of motor. My table saw does this. Starts out a loud 60 Hz hum which quickly increases in frequency as the motor spins up, then gets inaudible or washed out by rushing air when full speed is reached. Motors that do this are not really appropriate for residential blowers. It also possible it's not ...


5

(I'm an American living in Austria.) My first thought was something related to the heating system too (although we're not heating yet in Vienna). I would still call the Rauchfangkehrer (chimney sweeps). There should be a flyer in the entry area of your building for the one responsible for your area. In Vienna, the flyer is usually yellow with a stylized ...


5

Various things to check: Is there a way for air to ENTER the bath? A fan will expel air, but only when there is makeup air to replace it. Make sure there is a sufficient gap under the bathroom door. (An easy way to test this issue is to run the fan with and without the door open and see if there is a difference) as others have stated, make sure the fan is ...


5

I recently found two of my three bath fans had the interior damper stuck shut. I had checked the damper on the outside of the house, no problems, but then I stuck my fingers into the duct from the fan housing and discovered: 1) there is another damper there and 2) it was stuck shut! One was just stuck by some old paint and freed up with a poke, the other ...


5

There are two neutrals on the fan light, because The fan gets a hot and a neutral. The light gets a hot and a neutral. By giving you separate neutrals, it gives you the versatility of being able to put the fan and light on separate circuits, or other circumstance where you'd need separate neutrals. In your case, and in most instances, both devices ...


4

If you replaced the start capacitor, and you are getting proper voltage to the fan motor than the only thing left is to replace the fan motor. If the fan turns at all without forcing, it should spin when powered up. If the fan turns freely or not is not a definitive indication that is good or bad.


4

You need a pair of retaining ring pliers. Use the retaining ring pliers to remove the retaining ring. Pull the blade off the shaft. Push the blade on the new motor. Use the retaining ring pliers to install the retaining ring.


4

No, no, no! It's polarized for a reason. Just replace the receptacle with a polarized receptacle. Make sure the taller slot is on the neutral side. They look like this, note the absence of a ground pin. There may be a green screw on the outlet nonetheless, that grounds the outlet. It should be left disconnected unless ground is actually present in ...


4

A bathroom exhaust fan needs to be vented outside the home!. This sewer pipe is where the waste goes and will not provide a good or safe vent. Vents on the waste pipes prevent the water from being sucked out of the traps, or u bends, if the gasses can come back into the home there can be bad smells and at the worst methane explosions.


4

First off, I'd rework the connections on the switch. They are pulling out of the terminal screws. The red wire appears to be the switched voltage to the fan. It should be connected to the black and blue wires from the fan. The blue wire is for a light fixture should you want to add one later. The white wire from the fan should be connected to the group of ...


4

The 2 black + 1 white is your always-hot bundle. You won't use it (unless you want to power the fan 24x7 and use a remote on it). The 2 white is the neutral bundle. Your fan will need that. The loose black is the switched-hot from the switch. (it is the partner wire to the oddball white from above). This is the switched-hot for the fan. The switch ...


4

Yes, you have a rodent or bird nest in there. No, you shouldn't break anything. That vent flap is simply hanging on two little integral pins or arms. You can see them in the photo. You should be able to tilt the flap into alignment with the duct, then flex it to release the arm on one side. Do your cleaning and replace the flap. Now find out why your ...


3

You can use the switch to operate both the fan and light, if you so choose. In fact, this is a common feature in single user public restrooms. As long as the switch and wiring are rated for the amount of current, which unless you get a huge fan, it should be. If you have the ability to install a new cable (or pull an extra wire, if the wires happen to be ...


3

You haven't provided a whole lot of information, such as if the fan worked with the old thermostat. Regardless, I can help diagnose the problem. The wires involved are: R or Rh (possibly red) - 24V AC power G (Possibly green) - Fan W (Possibly white) - Heating call Don't make any assumptions on wiring. You need to open the furnace, find where on the ...


3

Sticky old oil in the bearings. After buzzing (and probably turning very slowly) for a while, the motor heats up enough for the oil to liquify, and then it runs normally. Try fresh oil if the bearings have a place to apply oil, or consider a new fan. This is a common problem with old fans.


3

You want a hole plug something like this These are similar to electrical knockout plugs. If you can't find a source, you could use a brass cap on the outside and a short machine screw on the inside (with a washer if needed). In either case, you need to be certain the capping material is not interfering with existing mechanisms or wires. Since the pull ...


3

WD-40 is a penetrating oil and corrosion preventative. As a lubricant, it is quite short term as it tends to evaporate. And the lubrication type for an electric motor depends on the type of bearing. Ball bearings require grease. Flush the bearing with solvent to clean out the old gunk and pack with a light bearing grease. Oilite style sleeve bearings ...


3

Let's get one thing straight. Ground-Fault Circuit Interrupter protection for personnel is designed and intended to protect a human (or any animal I guess), from being electrocuted (killed) due to an electrical fault. In most situations, the grounding system will handle any direct faults to ground. A GFCI devices is there to protect you, if you happen to ...


3

I used the variac and got the noise level down from 74-84db to 45. Pleasant white noise, vs Is that Industrial Music you're playing? I researched various approaches, that fall into the basic camps of a variable resistor (like the sun court-variable speed, speed bully) and variable transformer. The resistor ($20-$30) absorbs part of the power, thus ...


3

From my point of view this metal part is a base plate which makes it possible to mount the fan onto the plastic parts. As RedGrittyBrick noted, it is (or better was) zinc-plated. It seems to me, that most of the zinc layer is oxidized and cannot provide galvanic protection anymore. So why did it loose the zinc layer so quickly? If it was behind a cover ...


3

We had the same thing happen to our system. During the winter, water accumulated under the concrete where the radon pipes went into the basement slab and totally blocked the air flow causing our radon levels to go up. We have a 24/7 radon alarm that showed the higher levels. We ordered a new fan but that was not the problem. We cut the pipe near the ...


3

If you're measuring voltage by touching your probes to the terminals on a single 3-way switch, you're not accomplishing much. Your readings will come out as follows. From common to the closed traveler terminal, you'll read 0 volts. This is because common is electrically connected to this terminal, so they're at the same voltage potential. From common to ...


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