18

Looks more like mildew, which is related to mold, but not as dangerous (from a health standpoint). Yes, a dehumidifier could help prevent mildew. I would also look for sources of the moisture, e.g. a clothes dryer that is not venting to the outside, a bathroom vent that is not functioning (or non-existent), water leaking somewhere etc.


10

This sounds like a leak at the internal connection from the bucket drip point to the hose adapter. Internally, our Artic King dehumidifier has a small pipe coming out of the dehumidifier over the bucket. It also has an attachment to convert the unit from bucket to hose. The attachment consists of a plastic flange for the hose to attach to and a short piece ...


7

Here's one further possibility: an ice blockage. If the airflow is too weak (dirty filters, externally obstructed, or a failing fan), or the humidity very high at fairly low temperature, ice builds up on the coils. Then the heat pump cuts out, but the fan might keep running. The ice should melt and drip, but it can come off in lumps, and those can block ...


6

TLDR: Not just no, but heck no. Throwing good money after very bad First, electricity costs: any dehumidifier old enough to use R-22 is also super inefficient as-built: The government's Energy Star program has really pushed/incentivized manufacturers to make appliances more efficient, and wow, have they ever done it! We constantly have people asking how ...


6

Yes it is mold. However it doesn't appear to be growing. It looks like the apartment had a water issue and it wasn't dried very quickly. This surface mold can be cleaned up from most things pretty quickly with soap and water - includes walls too. I would thoroughly clean everything, air things out, start a fan, and then reassess after a few weeks. For ...


5

I'd get a dehumidifier. Areas that don't have good air circulation like closets are more effected. What kind of heating system is your apartment on? Mold needs food (dust works) and moisture. Moisture issues typically arise when heating is insufficient, exhaust fans are not being used, or other sources of moisture are allowed to accumulate (wet bicycles ...


5

All of the answers here are great! Taking a noteworthy but slightly different angle on answering it: Is it safe? I agree with everyone given the pictures you showed that it doesn't seem bad, but there is plenty we cannot see. So I always give the default "we can't know" but we can give you a good guess. How is the rest of the place and is this ...


5

Your basement is not nearly as sealed as you think. Which is actually a good thing. You need to constantly have make up air. That is air to replace the air you breathe. Otherwise, while your H2O is going down (thanks to the dehumidifier), your O2 is also going down and your CO2 is going up as you breathe. I am not going to do the math, but just think "...


4

It seems both sources of water are low-flow resulting from condensation (one incidental, one deliberate) so you shouldn't challenge the condensate pump. I'd do it.


4

Specifications shows 115V @ 4.8amp. With that values it is likely he stated to get at least a 16gauge extension cord. I prefer to get at least 14gauge cords as the price is usually very near those for the 16gauge cords.


4

With "damp", your enemy is humidity, or water which is dissolved in the air. Warm air can disolve a lot more water than cool air. When warm, water-saturated air moves to a cooler place, it cools the air. The water cannot remain in the air, and must condense, typically on a cool object. A heater raises the air temperature, which temporarily increases ...


4

While you're checking out where the moisture's coming from, try a few of the desiccant products available at your home stores to absorb the excess moisture. You'll be amazed at how well they work. The one pictured below I used and placed in my closet where some mildew was growing due to a leak in the cinder block wall. It really absorbed the moisture in the ...


4

The condensate from natural gas burning comes mainly from the burning. Methane is the primary component of gas, and it is chemically CH4. When burned, you have: ... a problem, because MathJax does not appear to be enabled on this exchange ... CH4 + 2 O2 --> CO2 + 2 H2O The relevant parts here are that 2 "oxygen" molecules from the air are ...


3

The knurled portion of the fitting is the part that unscrews. The longer brass-colored portion should be held stationary, perhaps with pliers while loosening, perhaps with another set of pliers, the knurled portion. This should allow you to release the hose.


3

Refrigerant cycle dehumidifiers have some sensitivities, and I would recommend operating in accordance with the manufacturers recommendations. I operated several types of conventional and LGR commercial grade dehumidifiers for many years. I don't know what your machine needs, but there were several reasons why our machines needed to be operated properly. ...


3

You set a Relative Humidity value with a humidifier, not a temperature (as indicated on the control pad). The reason for your confusion may be that when you set some humidifiers, the set point is displayed for a short time, and then the actual RH is displayed on a long-term basis. You won't see the set RH again unless you adjust it.


3

I keep my dehumidifier at 60% or 65%. That's a good default when you're using the space for storage or are concerned about limiting mold/mildew. If you're not having problems with the humidity, then consider running it at a higher setting or even removing the dehumidifier altogether. Dehumidifiers use a lot of energy.


3

Should be fine. All HVAC equipment that make condensate drain into risers just like this, no need for air gap because the source of the water is not connected to the potable water system in the house.


3

You need an ultimate-heat-sink OUTSIDE the house Here's what you can't do: Server makes heat in box, A/C moves the heat out of the box and into the tiny-house, tiny house copes with ambient + solar load + server load + A/C load all stacking to make it so hot you can bake cookies. At that point, the A/C, will break down due to not being able to transfer the ...


3

For an A/C unit to reduce the % of relative humidity in your home a properly sized A/C unit coupled with a dehumidifier must run a long time to decrease that humidity. When the A/C unit is first turned on, it begins to cool the room temperature which may actually increase the relative humidity. Just because the room temperature is reduced does not mean that ...


3

The issue with dehumidifiers is they are basically air conditioning units that once they cool the air by passing it over the evaporator coil to collect the moisture they reheat it by passing the air over the condenser coil, the energy consumed slightly warms the area. The problem is the evaporator (the part cooling) will not be as effective because of the ...


3

If the dehumidifier uses a pump to actively remove water from the collection bucket, then it could be an issue with the controls system. We had a cheap dehumidifier that had to be set explicitly to "continuous mode" before it would employ the pump. Unfortunately if the device lost power at any time, it would forget and reset itself to the default &...


3

Having had this many times on various dehs over the years it seemed to be a consequence of the drain hose becoming blocked with some sort of slime that presumably grew in the presence of moisture and dust in the circulated air that would contaminate the condensate The slow flow experienced by a relatively narrow hose seemed to further exacerbate the problem ...


2

In theory, "+/- 5% in range of 30%-90%" means that... if you set the humidistat dial to 30%, it might actually be set to anywhere from 25% to 35% if you set the humidistat dial to 90%, it might actually be set to anywhere from 85% to 95% In reality, consumer humidistats generally aren't very precise (e.g. relatively less precise than most thermostats). ...


2

This is a really common question, that applies to many things: heat, air conditioning, dehumidifiers, lighting and even PCs. "Isn't it better to just leave the machine running continuously? The energy costs of restarting it must be enormous, surely they must be more than the costs of leaving it running." Almost universally, the answer is nope. "Leave ...


2

Aside from the issue of water volume, consider the chemical composition... If your HVAC system is an air conditioner, then the condensate it produces is no different at all than the water produced by the dehumidifier. The cooling coil in the A/C unit is, in fact, dehumidifying as a side-effect (*). So water from the dehumidifer should be chemically ...


2

Most house wiring is 14 gauge. Kitchens are wired using 12 gauge but this only started in the late 2000's. As the entire unit is rated less than 6 amps even if the motor inrush at start up is 100% that still means less than 12 amp total draw. A standard house circuit on a 15 amp breaker usually has 14 awg nmd90 cable, and a 15 amp breaker is rated for 12 ...


2

Technically, extension cords are not meant to be used as permanent wiring. So the proper solution, would be to install a receptacle near where the device will be used. Then plug the unit in to the receptacle, using the factory installed cord. If you want to use an extension cord, do so at your own risk. For a unit that draws less than 5 amperes, a 16 gauge ...


2

Your instructions are basically telling you this: Remove the JUMPER from Float Switch terminals. Wire the Float Switch to the terminals (you should have two wires - one wire goes to one terminal the other wire to the other terminal) Does not matter which wire just that they are wired one to one terminal and the other wire to the other terminal. The Switch ...


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