Hot answers tagged

57

Move It! As already noted by some others, moving the dryer to the wall where the vent ends is a great idea. The location for a gas dryer needs three things: Vent - Absolutely perfect. While you're at it, since it will be a short distance, splurge on some rigid metal ductwork. For a short length it doesn't cost much, and it is much less vulnerable than the ...


35

Is this a big problem? I assume the fan has been like this for 15+ > years. If it is, I will look into getting a duct there, which is complicated by the inaccessible attic space. Moisture in the attic is a problem and the fan needs to be ducted to the exterior. I find it hard to believe that your attic has no access. Code requires one for many reasons ...


22

They do exist. Best bet is probably to contact a local sheet metal shop, if they don't have one they can build one. Expect this to cost in the tens of dollars range. You could potentially cap the end, and then use a round duct takeoff. The downside is it will restrict flow to the vent because of the abrupt end and sharp angles internally. There's another ...


21

Electric. Heat pump based. Condensing. Dryer. Duct disposed off, vent sealed for good. Depending on where you are, it may be way cheaper (heat pumps are quite efficient) in terms of gas/electricity bills. It may be somewhat more expensive if the gas is less than 1/4 price of the electricity per btu or kWh It requires no ducts. It doesn't vent anything. It ...


17

30 inches of height? 3 inches of offset? You need to learn how to use multi-section rigid duct elbows, which can be rotated to be considerably less than the 90 degrees you buy them at. You have plenty of room to make a nice little offset using a pair of elbows rotated to whatever matching degree gets you just the offset you need. You can literally rotate ...


16

First, what you do not want to use is duct tape, the adhesive fails under the extreme temperatures. For dryer vents and HVAC ducts, you should seal seams with a foil backed tape. This is designed to be airtight and handle the temperature swings that would cause other types of tape to fail. Note: sample product image, no affiliation or recommendation for ...


15

This will completely depend on the number of elbows, the size of the room being ventilated, and the power of the fan. In general for a bathroom, you'll be looking to have an Air Change per Hour (ACH) of 8. To accomplish this, you'll have to select a fan based on the size of the bathroom, and the equivalent duct length. Bath room size The first thing you'll ...


15

Replace the unit I would replace the unit to a condenser type dryer. They produce water instead and require no vent. Some units put the water directly to the drain or you can use a tray you have to empty regularly. I dont think you can get gas condenser units, so energy costs may be higher depdending on your location.


14

I live in Florida too so I know exactly what you mean about hot attics. I had the same problem except for the pvc water pipes. I put up a number of 2 by 8 feet of 3/4 inch plywood on the rafters. Where it was possible to move over some of the cables, I did it. where I couldn't move them, I took some 2x4's, notched them for the wires to go thru and put them ...


13

It’s some form of the DSC surface siren. It may have a built in siren driver or it may be “speaker only”. They are typically used with home alarm systems. These have been private labeled over time by various national alarm companies. They are not rated for use in a return air duct, nor allowed by any code. Unfortunately there are many in ducts just ...


10

You need a duct crimper like this to reduce the diameter of the end of one piece of duct: Run the tool around the end of the duct so that you have multiple parallel crimps. That piece should slide right into the uncrimped piece, giving you a secure connection to tape. If you don't want to spring for a dedicated tool, I've seen where people use needle-nosed ...


9

Sometimes ductwork under pressure and heat can experience a sudden deformation commonly referred to as oil-canning. This is where large rectangular pieces of box ducts have stiffening ribs formed into them to prevent deflection under pressure. If a particular panel is installed in just the right (or wrong) way, it can temporarily flex when it warms up. It'...


9

The biggest issue you have venting into the attic is warm, moist air being blown into a somewhat closed area (aside from the grease and particles you have a filter for). If the attic space you vent into is large, and has good ventilation this shouldn't be an issue. If you have to vent into a small portion of the attic and it looks like the moist air will ...


8

Yes, that's considered safe. The operating temperature of a dryer vent is not a problem for direct wood contact. Keep the vent clear and you'll have no fire. Ensure all joints are foil taped, so lint does not escape from the pipe. Should lint escape the pipe, it can build up in the wall. Use a "long sweep" elbow to make the vent easier to clean out. ...


8

There more restricted the airflow is, the more noise there will be. All contributing factors to noise: Diameter of duct (larger is better) Overall length (shorter is better) Number of turns/bends (fewer is better) Radius of turns (larger is better) Size reducers used (no reducers is better) Type of duct (smooth, rigid is better than flexible) Type of ...


8

The tiny screws have obviously failed so you'll need to re-fasten the flange to the subfloor. It looks like a 6 inch duct so if you can reach the duct with your hand then do this: Permanent fix Bring the duct back up to the hole Drill a hole through your floor and through the flange around the duct Make sure these holes will be covered by the register 2 ...


8

You could investigate the rectangular panel that holds the two holes in the wall. Perhaps it can be removed, then you can replace it with a new panel with a suitable hole cut out. You could search for a "dryer vent reducer", they are available in various sizes and materials. EDIT: Ideally buy a reducer where your hose fits well (doesn't have to be ...


7

I'm dealing with the same problem in our "new" (1992 vintage) home. Long duct runs expand and contract with conditioning cycles. In places where the duct is held tightly against the home's framing or other objects, sudden slipping results in pops or squeaks. Solutions generally involve one or more of the following: securing the duct more ...


7

Most forced-air HVAC systems in Residential are both heating and cooling. What might be efficient in the summer will not be efficient in the winter. So, where do you live and which do you use more? If you live in Arizona you optimize for cooling but if you live in Minnesota you optimize for heating. Then you just deal with a less efficient system in the ...


7

Venting into an attic is terrible in North American climate zones (6,7,8 in linked map below); less so in arid southern zones (1,2). This will give you a sense of how bad this might be. Beyond that, what @ack said. Map: zone map


7

Ack's answer is very good, so I won't repeat what they wrote. I will add that molds can definitely create a significant health hazard. I would get the attic inspected for the presence of hazardous levels of molds. From personal experience, I can tell you that mold inside walls and attics can be extremely hazardous to your health. It doesn't have to be ...


7

I see no reasons for replacing the existing ductwork with flexible insulated ducting unless the existing ducting has rusted out. I would just re-insulate with 3” fiberglass wrap if the existing metal ductwork is still in good condition. Some of the reasons for not replacing with modern insulated flexible ducting. Cost of replacing existing ducting and ...


7

The best is to cut a piece of metal larger than the hole and attach with sheet metal screws. You can cover this with duct tape but if the metal fits properly this should not be necessary. If you do not have the material, you can possibly salvage a large coffee can. You will need a tin snips to do this unless you can purchase a piece of metal of the proper ...


6

Dryer vents should be sealed with foil tape as they can withstand the high temperatures encountered during machine use. Other tapes, even duct tape, are susceptible to failure under the extreme heat. Non-foil tape can also catch on fire.


6

Yes, now a days screws and a sealant of some sort are required. Use aluminum tape, not the gray plastic crap with cloth backing, it falls apart in a few years. There are brush on sealants also.


6

I'm confused/surprised by the existence of the void, but if you've got the space, then go for it. The only bit of mathematics to be concerned with is matching the cross section of the various sections of pipe.


6

24-gauge is 24-gauge. However, the the silver type round pipe is coated with a rather inexpensive galvanizing coating. This coating is to inhibit rust. The galvanizing keeps oxygen and moisture away from the raw metal.These elements will discolor the metal, causing the metal to oxidize and rust, thus shortening the life of the metal. Now for the down side ...


6

If you only have access to the inside of the duct, and then only as far as you can reach, you won't be able to make a huge difference, but you might be able to reduce it a little. The sound is transmitted in mainly two ways, some is conducted through the metal of the duct and some is reflected around the inside of the duct until it reaches you. You can ...


6

Why do you need a duct? Most bathroom vanities, for example, are wide open from a slot in the floor to the louver on the kick panel. Just close off the compartment by any convenient means and call it a day. Staple some cardboard in if that works. And parts from a big box store should work just fine. A common 2x10 or whatever size duct could be laid right in ...


6

The air handler, blower, is designed to blow a certain amount of air over the cooling coils which in turn converts the refrigerant back to a gas from a liquid. It can only get the correct amount of air if all the returns and supplies are installed, otherwise the blower will not function as designed and can ice up the coils. This affects the compressor ...


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