11

There are many possible causes but some of the more common ones are: Clogged drain Dirty filter Excess humidity in the house Blocked air return or outlet duct Get it thawed out and make sure that the drain is flowing properly. Check the filter, check the blower for any obstructions.


8

Can you do this? ABSOLUTELY NOT!! Aside from (likely multiple) code violations you will never filter the lint out and will create a dangerous situation inside the furnace plenum, aside from clogging the furnace filter probably weekly.


7

I use concentrated liquid and will consider it the same as canned cleaner. Condenser cleaner or coil cleaner is formulated to take grease and oil out on top of the dirt. I use Nu-Calgon , Nu-Brite this is a non acid cleaner that mixed with water cuts the grease and oil and actually removes dirt better because of its foaming action. In my early days I ...


6

Yes, there is. The problem is that a mini-split is, after all, split. That means the pipes between compressor and evaporator are custom fit and routed through your house. Obviously, you can't fill the pipes until after they are fit. So if the fluid is freon, yeah, you're gonna need a license. However that's not the only way to do it. Entire Freon ...


5

Neutral is not ground That thing you are calling a "neutral bar" is bolted directly to the steel of the switch box. It cannot be a neutral, it must be a ground. Neutral is an active, live conductor that carries current under normal conditions. It is normal for it to have "voltage drop", or more accurately "voltage rise". Ground is a safety shield, and ...


5

I thought DIY installation of a minisplit R-410A system was allowed. The condensing unit is precharged with refrigerant, and in at least some of these systems no soldering is required to connect the refrigerant lines. One might have to have a licensed technician do any adjustment of the charge, but the refrigerant charge on board as sold is correct for the ...


5

Move the orange wire on the troubled thermostat from O to B What you are seeing here are fairly classic signs of getting your system's reversing valve control backwards. In order to do their fancy tricks of being able to heat your house as well as cool it, heat pump systems need to be able to make the indoor and outdoor coils "swap places", and ...


4

You should contact an Electrician or HVAC technician. There seems to be a short-circuit somewhere in the circuit supplying the heating unit. DO NOT reset the breaker again until the problem is fixed. The reason I suspect a short-circuit, is because the breakers are reacting so quickly. If this was an overcurrent situation, the main breaker would likely ...


4

Heat pump? Keep salt away from the unit. Salt will attack and totally decompose the fins and will create electrolytic corrosion in the joints between aluminum and copper leading to destruction of the system. Icing during operation in a damp climate is normal, it's supposed to have a defrost cycle it runs through to remove the ice. Heat Pump Operation: ...


4

First step is to convert those prices into something you can compare on equal footing. $0.063042/kWh = $17.50/GJ, for oil, $2/gal = $13.7/GJ So, superficially, oil is cheaper than electricity for the same amount of energy. However, there are a couple of other things to consider. Oil combustion is only about 75 - 90% efficient at heating because you have ...


4

The law against "unlicensed" refrigerant handlers (whatever that means) does not specify any penalties, it just says it is "prohibited", so from a legal standpoint it is an unenforceable law. In order for a law to be prosecuted it must have a penalty specified, otherwise it is moot in court. For this reason, noone has ever been indicted for violating this so-...


4

Your house is not a space-ship, and it's not built like a space-ship. If it's built anywhere close to a spaceship, you can run continuous ventilation fans, typically though an air-air heat exchanger. If it's of "normal construction" normal leakage will take care of adequate air exchange. If you are adequately curious you can have a "blower door test" done ...


4

I don't think the problem you're having would be solved by a fan delay. When the fan turns on, it has to purge all the "cold" air from the ducts, before the warm air reaches the registers. There's not much that can be done to solve that problem, other than having really short duct runs. If you did add a delay, the system would likely overheat. This could ...


3

What you’re describing sounds like a combination of negative pressure in the compartment that the drain pan connected to and an incorrectly sized p-trap on the condensate drain. The depth of the t-prap has to be greater than the negative pressure in inches of water column of the compartment where the drain is connected to. A t-prap with insufficient depth, ...


3

I had the exact problem with my condensate drain not draining while running. My unit design is such that the blower pulls air through the A-Coil rather than pushing it through. This design pulls air through the drain pipes and won't allow water to drain. Typical drain configuration utilizes a Tee with a stand pipe so the drain is open above the trap. This ...


3

Check the thermostat O (orange) terminal with a multimeter to ground. Most brands energize (apply 24V AC on the terminal) in cooling mode. A bunch of things could be going on such as a wire loose, bad thermostat, bad control board in heat pump or bad reversing valve but the first thing to check is the thermostat then you can work your way back to the ...


3

Your heat pump switches between heating and cooling mode through a reversing valve. It sounds like that is where your problem is; it could be that your thermostat has gone bad, or it could be something else. The outside condensing unit is blowing 68 degrees because the system is pulling heat out of the outside air, and pumping it into the house.


3

A blower will only work if you are content with A/C only and no heat. It's probably illegal to have a house with no heat unless you live in the tropics. AFAIK, most A/C units cannot be converted to heat pumps, so it would likely be a complete system replacement. Also, with conventional heat pumps in all but the most temperate climates, you need a source of ...


3

Yes, that is correct. A closed-loop heat pump work by circulating a refrigerant in a loop, where there are two heat exchangers separated on one side by a compressor and on the other by a valve. Your expectation is correct: In heating mode, the inside heat exchanger does not cause condensation and therefore does not dry out the air. Having said that, there ...


3

Warm climates are good candidates for heat pumps. Heat pumps have more efficiency in heating mode when the ambient temperature is warmer, less efficiency when the ambient temperature is colder. If the outside temp falls too low, the heat pump stops providing useful heat. This is why heat pumps are often supplemented by "emergency" electric heaters that ...


3

A heat pump thermostat prefers to operate the heat pump under "usual" conditions as that is expected to be less expensive. It will invoke the back up (or "emergency heat") when any of several conditions occur: The current indoor temperature is more than 4 °F/2 °C cooler than the temperature setpoint. This is the blockhead approach taken by ...


3

You're right, but only because oil is the worst, most expensive way to heat a home. Pretty much anything beats it, except maybe electric resistance in places with high electricity prices. Wood, gas, and heat pump electric will all beat the pants off oil. That said, even 80% efficiency may be optimistic for a modern high efficiency wood stove. But even if ...


3

Since you talk about venting, I'm going to assume you're talking about a gas-fired water heater. First thing you should know is that in many jurisdictions, gas pipe fitting may only be performed by licensed gas fitters. Based on that and the fact that you are asking these types of questions leads me to believe you are probably out of your depth on installing ...


3

The question you ask about a "4-ton air-handler" is that you can expect the air-handler to produce enough air supply to support a 4 ton A/C unit requiring about 1600 cfm. The actual air flow is dependent upon the total resistance to air flow in the whole system. Since the motor supplied is a variable speed or more probably a 4 speed motor, then you could ...


3

Many fan coils do have a delay for the fan. A solid state delay and relay could also be added to a fan coil unit. However the air is not actually cold but room temperature except for any air trapped in the ducts which needs to be purged anyway so a delay wouldn’t help. Any little heat being produced by the heat pump will go into the house so the only thing ...


3

You are right that a unitary HPWH is a parasite heating load in the winter... When most people think of a heat pump water heater, they think of the unitary heat pump water heaters that were mandated as a replacement for large electric tanks (bigger than a 55gal drum) by the NAECA 3 standards, released in 2015. These have all the heat pump machinery atop ...


3

Cap off the neutral with a wirenut, connect the ground to the "neutral" bar in your disconnect Since your heat pump does not need the neutral, you simply cap it off with an appropriately sized wirenut. The ground, then, lands on the ground bar in your disconnect (even though it gets called a neutral bar, it's really a ground bar here). That way, ...


3

Some possibilities come to mind : Louvered panels, slatted panels, slatted ventilation panels. A google search for the text below gave many from 4" by 4" to fencing and all types in between. slatted ventilation panels


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