51

I don't like the "OMG" abbreviation and seldom use it, but in this case OMG! It would have been bad enough to vent an electric dryer into a crawl (lint, moisture, fire danger), but to vent a gas dryer into a crawl is unconscionable. Gas dryers vent carbon monoxide. It interferes with your body's ability to transport oxygen. If that seeps into the house it ...


26

Your gas dryer vents its combustion products outside along with the moisture from your clothes, so it is vented to the outside. Your oven doesn't vent out mostly for sake of having limited combustion. There are ventless heaters available. However you run it, though, any natural gas burning device will create water vapor and carbon dioxide. If it ...


24

The actual amount of combustion air - i.e., air flowing past the burner to provide oxygen and leave with less oxygen but more CO2 and possibly other combustion byproducts - is very little. The gap allows additional air to flow in and the combined air, if the ductwork is designed and installed properly, flows through the ductwork and out of the house. If you ...


13

This is a draft diverter. If the heater was connected directly to the chimney, the hot flue gas would rise, creating draft in the heater. While that is a good thing, the amount of draft would depend on the particular chimney configuration in that installation, amongst other things. Excessive draft can cause problems, such as too much air being drawn ...


12

manassehkatz covered a lot, but the simple answer is constant air flow The draft will change in the chimney as exhaust vents towards it – especially when going from cold air to hot. A draft hood is placed above the upper most part of the gas furnace to draw air into the chimney and makes it possible to draw more or less air through the chimney as necessary ...


12

As George Anderson's answer says, this is extremely unsafe and must be fixed. But don't try to fix it by making expensive modifications to your home. Gas and electric dryers are inefficient anyway, and it would make a lot of sense to replace the gas dryer with a heat pump dryer (which doesn't need a vent). Heat pump dryers operate like a dehumidifier, using ...


10

This appears to be a simple misunderstanding of how a gas dryer works. The gas dryer creates heat by burning air and the gas together, then blowing the heated air and combustion mixture through the clothes and then out the dryer vent. In other words, the combustion gases are vented to the outside, per code, along with the moisture from the clothing. Since ...


9

DO NOT DO IT!!!! Chimney vents must not be compromised! All heat and gas related stacks must be left intact. No additional venting or other holes may be put in them. As the comments have noted, you run the serious risk of carbon monoxide poisoning, as well as the risk of chimney and house fires. Find another route well away from the chimney.


8

I am a Local HVAC Tech in the Toronto area. As stated, this exhaust is not installed according to local codes and the manufacturers installation instructions. There is no surprise that you are getting freezing condensation on the brick of the house. The reason for having the vent terminate straight out and away from the building is to avoid this. The facing ...


8

You can install a reducer, but you'll cut your flow volume by an equal proportion: 28.3in2 - 7.1in2 = 21.2in2 (an area reduction of 75% when going from 6" to 3" duct) This will negate a significant amount of your fan upgrade, will make it work harder, and may shorten the motor's life due to reduced cooling. You might ask yourself whether you really need ...


7

In the past I was a big fan of soffit vents. I figured if you used quality vents with a good back-draft damper, and sealed and insulated the duct well, it was a great way to vent bathrooms. There are several key benefits: First and foremost, it avoids penetrating either the roof or a gable wall, so it eliminates any risk of liquid water intrusion from ...


6

I think you just need to find a better built vent hood. The first one I found searching on HD specifically calls out this problem in the description: Unlike other versions that tend to rattle in the wind, the back draft damper on the ProMax cap has been designed for noise and wind resistance and its stylish wide mouth appearance helps to optimize the ...


6

If you have access to the attic; and presumably the top of the bathroom fan, you may be able to follow the duct. If you don't have access to the top side of the fan, you could remove the cover and take a peek inside. You should be able to get a glimpse of the outlet, which should allow you to determine if there's ducting attached. In my house, the bathroom ...


6

I can't answer whether it complies with code or not since that depends on where you are, but I doubt it would matter. It's compressed some, but the volume is the same; it's just a different shape, and only slightly at that. Codes regarding airflow (and water flow) issues are mostly concerned with turns. A 90 degree angle will limit airflow whereas a larger ...


6

According to IRC, the duct must be made from galvanized steel, stainless steel or copper. It must have a smooth interior, and be air tight. Which means you're not going to want to use a flexible product for this application, especially that flexible plastic crap. Instead, you'll want to use rigid duct like this. And you'll want to make sure you seal all ...


6

No. Your traps need to have water in them to prevent sewer gasses from getting into your home. If your vent "seal" was strong enough, you could "clear" the trap allowing gas into the home. Flammable, stinky, potentially deadly gas into the home. So no. Don't do it.


5

The exhaust pipe discharge is too close to the house. It should extend 8 to 12 inches from the wall if using tee on vent end. The exhaust might have been placed in its odd position because of a gas regulator vent. I see the pipe exits near the gas service. From a survey of high efficiency furnace installation manuals, and my own experience installing my ...


5

This completely depends on your location, and what codes you follow. The first mention of exhausting to the outdoors I could find in International Residential Code (IRC), was in the 2003 version. International Residential Code (IRC) 2003 Chapter 15 - Exhaust Systems SECTION M1506 MECHANICAL VENTILATION M1506.2 Recirculation of air. Exhaust ...


5

If possible, you want everything rigid: the connection from the dryer to the wall, the duct in the wall, and the duct in the attic. Sometimes rigid for the connection between the dryer and the wall is difficult to get right with a rigid duct so if you have to go with flexible duct then use the smallest piece practical. A secondary lint trap is probably not ...


5

You'll want to check with your local government. The sale of a house often requires some things to be brought up to current code. What things are required, depends on the local government. For example. In my area, sump pumps are required. If you're selling a house without a sump, you'll have to install one before you can close. A nearby area requires ...


5

Let's back up here for just a second and note something You almost certainly don't need a 150CFM fan. So your original fan was a stock 50CFM (probably NuTone or one of its predecessors) that's a 4-sone fan, meaning it sounds like it's been cleared for takeoff when you flip that switch. So you went out and bought this bad boy and though "I'll solve this ...


5

You're fine IFGC 503.8 is the governing Code passage here, and it sets no minimum spacing for direct-vent terminations from each other, just from features that could draw combustion gasses into room air (such as fresh air intakes and openable windows).


4

OK--the UCC code specifically says: • Section 1501.1 Outdoor discharge – Air removed by every mechanical exhaust system shall be discharged to the outdoors • Air shall not be exhausted into an attic, soffit, ridge vent or crawl space. – Exception: Whole house ventilation-type attic fans that discharge into the attic space of dwelling units having ...


4

I'm presuming you're using the pillow case as a lint filter. The bigger problem will be humidity. You'll be putting all of the moisture from the wet clothes into the air. After a couple loads, this makes the room really, really, REALLY humid (I've been there). If you can swing it, you might be well off getting some flex dryer duct and running the end ...


4

It really doesn't make any difference when it comes to lint build up. But you might consider putting a secondary lint trap near the dryer to help reduce the amount of lint trapped in the line.


4

At the least, buy this. The reason it is the least, is lint will still get trapped in the edge that goes into the flexible part. Joints should be placed so the moving air flows over the joint, not into the joint. The reducer you have at first will restrict the flow, and still have the joint facing in the wrong direction, although you would not need to cut ...


4

Assuming the 16' distance, plus any other lengths and elbows falls within the manufacturer's guidelines, I would use sheet metal round ducts, usually 4" diameter. If you mount them so the lengthwise seam is at the top (or close to it), then you don't have an issue with any moisture that might collect on the bottom leaking out. Join the duct sections ...


3

Leaking air, or leaking water? If leaking air, either replace it if it's degraded, or try duct joint sealant (which stands a somewhat better chance of lasting than duct tape.) "Leaking" water - a bathroom exhaust vent needs to be heavily insulated all along its length, and should preferably run straight up, then turn and slope gently to the outside, so ...


3

Well, I am answering my own question here. The answer is "Yes, you can!" (or at least "Yes, I did!"). I am sure it's safe so long as you keep an eye on it. The pillow case didn't get absurdly hot, either. After about 40 minutes, my load was done. Now that I got my vent cleaned today, I should see even faster drying times since the pillow case method ...


3

While it is highly recommended, having a bath exhaust fan, per se, is NOT required as of the 2009 IRC code (which is current for my location). Language including the option for mechanical exhaust appears to be 2003. Summarizing IRC R 303.3 What is required is either: A window that will open to a minimum of 1.5 sq-ft (with a total glazing of 3 SF) or ...


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