18

You may be looking at the problem backwards, the freezing lines could be a symptom of the problem not the cause. Start by looking for blockages in the system that would cause lower air flow / heat exchange. Dirty filters. Clogged ducts. Closed dampers. Closed/Blocked vent covers. Dirty coils. Basically if the system cannot exchange the heat/cold, it will ...


16

Holy smoke, this is a "Rule of Six" panel! A Rule of Six panel has a "Main Breaker" area with up to six main breakers. All must be shut off to shut off the power. All six have their buses energized at all times. Then, one of those breakers feeds an "internal subpanel" area with any number of breakers. In this case, your panel is built as a "Rule of ...


11

Yes, placing registers (or other heat sources such as radiators) near exterior windows and doors is the usual practice. This is done in order to combat cold drafts and ensure a more even temperature throughout the room. Here's a Q&A on the subject from Ask This Old House: Window glass is the coldest part of a wall. When warm room air hits it, the ...


9

Most units require a pad when installed . at the age of the unit I would probably not try to put a pad underneath as this may create a leak. In 99 the common refrigerant was R22 and the cost of a recharge if a leak is created may cost close to $1k as r22 is being phased out and local shops in my area charge 100 per pound.gravel around the unit could keep ...


9

Very few HVAC systems aren't able to handle abrupt power loss. I've flipped the switches on dozens of systems hundreds of times to change filters and perform other service. The gas valve will close and the control boards have algorithms to recover. It may feel nicer to shut them down gently, but there's no good reason to worry about it. After all, power ...


8

Whether you tape it or otherwise block it, the effect will be the same and it will not cause any damage to your system; it would be no different than if there was a standard register there that was closed. The only thing I'll note is that duct tape will eventually dry up and fall off. Ideally you would use foil HVAC tape (source: homedepot.ca) Unlike ...


8

Using a larger ground conductor is fine. Using a smaller gauge wire for grounding was common in the past, but not correct anymore. The grounding conductor should be at least as large as the other conductors.


7

When the person you spoke to said to measure the "temperature difference between the return and supply sides". What they were talking about, is what's known as Delta T (of the evaporator). It sounds like you took the first measurement in the proper place (or close to it), but not the second measurement. The "supply side" refers to the air just after it ...


6

The large, cold, low pressure line, carrying the evaporated refrigerant from the house, should be insulated to prevent condensation. The small, warm, high pressure line, carrying condensed refrigerant into the house, should not be insulated. I am not an air conditioning professional. However, en.allexperts.com, www.bobvila.com, and www.familyhandyman.com, ...


6

If a breaker is tripping regularly, that's a serious problem you should look at. That is not normal or acceptable. It means something is wrong with your overcurrent protection, or a defective device actually drawing too much current. It is normal for circuit breakers to allow overcurrent for a short amount of time. This is needed by motors to start, ...


6

Always short the capacitor as early into the disassembly process as you can. You may accidentally discharge it when handling it or removing it from the unit, and these components have enough energy to kill you. I make sure to wear jeans and leather boots with a rubber sole when discharging capacitors, and always when it's relatively dry out. I keep my ...


6

I wouldn't short the cap to discharge it. When you do that, a huge current flows for a very short time. This current is almost certainly far beyond the rated current capabilities of the cap. You may not destroy the cap, but you are overstressing it and shortening its life. I would recommend disconnecting one terminal of the cap first, then shorting it ...


6

I would start by turning the thermostat off, including the fan setting to "off" and not "auto". The HVAC breaker should be a 240v double pole breaker. Most homes have four of those. One for the water heater, range, dryer and the HVAC. Turn the breaker to the HVAC off. If you have a heat pump, there will be a shut off near it outside (probably mounted to the ...


5

The past home owner left these in my place. Where the blowing air just gets caught behind the curtains, is under furniture or tropical plants, I divert it, and this just happens to be towards places where people sit. Keep in mind in the winter, having the warm air low helps mix it. But in all seasons, the vents are near windows and doors to counteract the ...


5

List of possible causes and fixes: Insufficient airflow. You have identified this issue but not the cause. 1) Take all air filters out of the system. Give the system 30-40 minutes and see if this fixes the issue. 2) Ensure all vents are fully open. 3) Verify and/or adjust the cooling blower's air speed. WARNING: Turn the power off to the HVAC before doing ...


5

The text Volts 208/230 Phase 1 means the device will run on either 208 volts or 230 volts (which is nominally 240 volts). In the amps section, the separated numbers (which are the same) are the corresponding value for operation on 208 or 230 volts, respectively.


5

Hard to say based only on what you show and describe here. We can't really know exactly what you have without seeing what's inside. The 2 pole 50A breaker what has the word "Main" written next to it is probably the main breaker for all of the power coming from your utility meter, or al least may have started out that way at one time. But when you say that ...


4

I would strongly encourage you to replace this unit (the Siemens component, not the entire AC) and replace the ends to those electrical wires. Simply put if the rust situation is that terrible I wouldn't be at all surprised if the integrity of the unit is already compromised, i.e. ready to fail you at any time. Your yellow wire is almost certainly why it's ...


4

It sounds like you have a condensation draining problem. Air conditioners capture a lot of water from the air. Most of the time A/C water leaks are caused by a problem draining this condensation. Stopping the a/c will stop the condensation, and eventually (depending on how much water is backed-up) the unit will stop leaking.


4

Sure -- or at least, there's nothing about having round ducts in the attic that would make A/C installation more difficult. In fact, because cold air is more dense than warm air, ceiling vents are usually considered better for cooling. The cool air flows down from the ceiling, helping ensure your rooms are evenly cooled. That's why many houses in warm ...


4

According to Trane installation instructions, the technician is correct. They do require 3' of clear space in front of the control box. As for why the technician chose this orientation, I can only speculate. It looks to me like the access panel is on the corner of the unit, which would mean there has to be 3' clear space at the corner. Obviously the ...


4

If you were a customer of mine and wouldn't let me rip out that equipment, I would walk away. There isn't a chance in the world I would add additional load to the existing over current protection. The load center you have is rated for energy consumption from the 60's. Modern day energy consumption creates more heat in the equipment because of harmonics, ...


3

I don't have HVAC experience but here's a few ideas you could investigate Repair For the wires, it might be best to cut off the corroded connectors strip a short part of insulation and crimp on new connectors. For the spade terminals on the various devices you could use a wire brush to remove as much corrosion as possible. Prevention To prevent future ...


3

IMO that amount of rust is not normal. I live in Texas and it gets really humid sometimes. I've repaired both my last unit that was 8+ years old and my new unit that is 4+ years old and neither had any rust whatsoever inside the enclosure. Just ants and spiders for me. I'd imagine that your relay is having trouble closing. After turning off the power you ...


3

I would only place the unit in the attic if it was a second unit and it avoided ducts running up and down walls. With an attic unit, you have to worry about a clog in the condensate line causing a leak in your ceiling. Access is frequently more difficult and requires a trip through your entire home. As tabun mentioned, it's noisier. You'd also need to run ...


3

This DOE reference indicates, with better double glazed windows and better insulation, that ducts should not be run in outside walls anymore. HVAC Ducts Shall Not Be Run within Exterior Walls In the past, it was common practice to run ducts inside a wall cavity of an exterior frame wall. It is sometimes done today. However, we have learned that ...


3

We had the same problem in our house, and we've simply lived with it - having had HVAC companies come out and inspect or evaluate it. They all said the system was in good working order, and was appropriately sized for our house. This year we replaced 3 windows and a doorwall in the first floor of the house, and suddenly we can not only maintain a ...


3

You'll want to create a small leach pit, which will allow the water to drain into the ground. Start by digging a hole about 12-18" deep (depending on your soil), Next fill the bottom of the hole (about half the hole) with crushed stone (loosely compacted). Fill the rest of the hole to about 1" from the top with sand, then finish with a nice decorative ...


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