35

Yes, you'll distribute crud through your ventilation. On top of that, you'll accumulate crud in your AC unit. BAAAAADDD idea.


17

Yep... "BAAAADDD" idea. Don't remove your filters, you'll gum up your equipment. Nobody's house is "lint free". I really want the least amount of resistance in order to cool the house as fast as possible during these hot summer days. Wondering what you guys think about this, thanks. How about OTHER sources of "resistance". ...


10

The air handler is designed to work with a certain amount of resistance on the air inlet side as well as on the output side. If you would remove all resistance on the inlet side, the air handler motor could overspeed and be damaged. Modern motor controls may limit the overspeeding risk, but most definitely in the past fan motors were burned up by ...


8

The filter sits between the air return duct and the heat chamber, BEFORE the cool air enters the furnace. The air flow arrow almost certainly will point at the furnace, not away from it. If the filter sat after the furnace, there would be potential hazards associated with it, like possibility of fire (hot air hitting a cardboard frame) and release of nasty ...


5

It's a standard 25" x 16" x 4" filter (41625 is the size as well as the part number for that filter). You can pick them up at any DIY store in the US for about $40.


4

While there might be other uses for them , typically in your home there is not a real alternative use. Drop them off at a Habitat for Humanity Restore store.


4

I was naive when I moved into my first apartment with an HVAC. But the owners were also negligent and did not keep up with a maintenance schedule. I was later told that they replace the filter "once a year" but privately that it was more like "only when people ask". What happened was the unit never had a filter installed or it had a ...


3

Having done 3D printing with ABS myself, I'm familiar with this challenge. You need to exhaust the fumes--that's the long and short of it. Locate the printer near a window, open the window, and have a fan blowing air out the window every time you use the printer. Crack a window on the other side of your house for make-up air purposes. Or print with PLA, ...


3

Look into a downdraft table that you can exhaust outside. These are typically used for sanding or painting but the premise is the same. The table is perforated and sucks air down and then out to a dust collector or other exaust mechanism. You would place the printer on the table and ensure the exaust is running while you print.


3

Typically your air filters are at the inlet of your furnace. The air should be moving into the furnace through your filters. Point the arrow into the wall/floor.


3

I would do both plants and an air filter. You can purchase a reasonable sized air filter for $89 on Amazon (Honeywell 17000-S QuietCare True HEPA Air Purifier, 200 sq ft) that does a pretty good job of helping clear up the air. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000050AQ5/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1 I use this one because it's large ...


3

The CDC has a technical bit about the regulations for respirators (in the US, at least). There are two types of respirators - particulate and chemical / gaseous / vapor (they also make combination). Particulate respirators are the more important for the average home user, and are regulated by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). ...


3

Filters only work if the air has to go through them. The filter has air resistance and a gap doesn't, so if you leave a 1" gap, a disproportionate amount of air will flow through the hole, effectively making the situation even worse. If it is a choice of a smaller filter or nothing, at least do something like glue or tape a cardboard filler piece to the ...


3

You will still want a particulate filter at the intake, I was taught to put particulate filters at each inlet position this helps keep the ductwork clean and prevent build up in the heat exchanger. Electronic filters are the next best thing in my opinion but just like a 4” MERV 8 they need to be replaced regularly, the electronic take a few minutes to clean. ...


2

This is extremely easy to test and should have been tested at startup and every time it is serviced. Measure the temperature of the air entering the furnace and measure the temperature exiting the furnace using a probe style thermometer. Subtract the two numbers, this will get you your delta T. Look at the furnace name plate it will have the required ...


2

I recently went to change the filter in my new furnace and saw that the installed one said it was 16" x 25" x 5". I also couldn't find this size at my local bigbox stores. So I bought a 4" instead. The thing is, it fit perfectly. As it turns out, when I looked at the fine print on the old and new filters, their actual thickness was 4 3/8" in both cases. One ...


2

Get an air-conditioning system. I got it because my room has no output air channel so adding an extra output air-channel through the air-conditioning system fixed the problem of smoky windows. It filters the air and it is pretty easy to install: it takes air 1 block inside and 1 block moving outside so the pipe just to the window for the output channel. The ...


2

I have not seen conclusive data about carbon stopping pollen.Carbon is very good at catching odour within in air and excellent at absorbing chemicals in water (ie chlorine) I would strongly suggest you use a 5 micron sponge pre filter. This will stop bigger bits of pollen and other larger particles. Then after the pre filter use a HEPA filter. You can find ...


2

You'd be better off with a box fan as it has a large, square area that will support your filter media properly. It will need to be powerful enough to develop airflow despite the next addition. Not sure if you can find it, but we have here available electrostatic filter media by the roll. Cut several pieces large enough to cover the inlet side of the box fan....


2

If mold is an issue in your house I'm not sure a furnace filter is really going to help, even a HEPA filter as all it will do is filter the air passing through the filter; it won't do anything to prevent the mold spores from entering the air where they are growing. Generally the best solution to mold issues is to solve the moisture issue. If you have any ...


2

About any reasonably sized HEPA filter unit should do the job for you. There's huge price variations in the things, so looking for a unit w a decent fan motor, open cell foam pre-filter, and a low price is worthwhile. If you're do-it-yourself capable, they're not all that hard to make using a store-bought HEPA filter replacement filter, like this or similar, ...


2

Ends overlap Image Source Amazon


2

There are many options to improve air quality in your apartment. I did some research when I moved into my place last year, and learned that there are many indoor air quality issues that people don't realize may be harmful, like toxins from house cleaners or chemicals that expel from building materials, air conditioners, even electronics. A window fan that ...


2

You can cut the electrostatic filters (like Filtrete) down to size without altering their effectiveness. Just buy a size that is larger and cut it down with tin snips and/or scissors. When I do it (and I have done it many times) I use painter's masking tape to "seal" the cut edge. If you install it in the plenum of the forced-air unit, make sure you "seal" ...


2

A filtered fresh air supply(intake) would work for this. You can filter the air in your living space all you want, but any leak or opening could allow dirty air to leak in. If you filter outside air and blow the filtered air inside, your living space will be very slightly pressurized. Then any leaks would just be your clean air blowing outside, not the ...


2

the air filter is designed to clean the air flow prior to passing through the fan or the heat exchanger. its a common misconception that the air filter cleans the air for us humans. its there to keep the air clean for the machinery. its a secondary benefit that the air is cleaner for us. if you get a buildup of dust inside the fan, you get overheating of ...


2

The only good way to protect yourself is to not be around them. They should smoke outside or you will need a high quality respirator. Good luck!


2

It sounds like the range hood duct wasn't quite airtight, and some grease has escaped into the guts of the structure it was running through. This type of IAQ problem is basically a nuisance -- it's easy enough to fix by removing the culprit grease buildup from wherever it is, although finding it may be a hassle and may require management to dispatch someone ...


2

The filter placement looks incorrect to me. Every furnace I've seen has the filter on the other side of the venting into the fan box, causing the filter to be pulled tight against the opening. With the amount of air my furnace pulls, it would pull the filter away at the top and bottom allowing unfiltered air into the system. My theory would be that the ...


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