60

Send it back right now You bought it off Amazon Marketplace, the world's biggest junk shop. A step down from eBay, even, because this garbage hides amongst legitimate products. Here. See what you had to notice to even spot it? (Sorry for the huge size) Note the "Sold by some_random and Fulfilled by Amazon" part. That means "Amazon Marketplace" flea ...


45

In a 120/240V single split phase system, the two ungrounded (hot) legs are actually connected to the secondary winding of the distribution transformer. The transformer actually steps down the voltage to 240 volts, so the two legs are a complete 240 volt circuit. The grounded (neutral) conductor is connected to the center of the coil (center tap), which is ...


34

It starts with spaces in the panel A service panel has a basic unit I call a space. That's apparent when you look at the "knockouts" on the cover. Electrical power in North America delivers split-phase power. Meaning there are two "legs" or "poles" - L1 and L2 - both 120V from neutral, and opposite-phased so they add up to 240V. Here's an X-ray of a ...


27

I bet if you go to your service panel, you're going to find a completely full service panel, and a unique creature we call a "double-stuff breaker". Quite likely the landlord does his own electrical work or pays a dumb handyman (naughty naughty). He's out of space in the panel, so he resorted to those double-stuffs. He moved the dryer from a 2-pole ...


16

Send it back and get something that's listed for the job While what you have is indeed a 120V outlet (the outlet configuration governs, not some text in a manual somewhere), this outlet is not usable in a countertop or work surface in the USA, as it is not listed or labeled for use in a countertop or work surface, as requred by NEC 406.5(E) through (G): (...


15

It can be done, but you'll have to swap out the breaker. A "standard" US receptacle is rated for 125 volts, and 15 or 20 amperes. So you'll be going from a 30 ampere double pole breaker, to a 15 or 20 ampere single pole breaker. You could install a 15 or 20 ampere double pole breaker, but since you're not using the second line there's no point. In the ...


14

Not an immediate danger, but quite a few problems According to the spec sheet, this dryer is rated for 240V, 30A. Running it on "120V outlet" in the US normally means either 15A or 20A. Thanks to Ohm's law, if you run it on a 20A circuit you are probably safe. If you run it on a 15A circuit, there may be a safety issue. But in any case, there are plenty of ...


12

One possibility is that the two hots, labelled X and Y, are on the same line or leg of the service. The 240V electrical service typical in the US is a three wire Edison circuit, with two of the service wires, commonly called the legs or lines, designated L1 and L2, are at 240VAC at 60Hz, with the neutral tapped midway between the two - 120V L1 to N and ...


12

There are a few different issues here: 120 vs. 240 A typical oven for installation in a system like the US (split 120/240) will use 240V for the heating elements (i.e., needs 2 hot wires) and 120V for the controls (i.e., needs 1 hot, 1 neutral). So you can't run it on only 120 or only 240. That is different from, for example, a computer power supply that ...


12

This is a 220V outlet (note horizontal "live" slot on the right): And this is a 110V outlet (vertical "live" slot): Pictures valid in USA. Look at these two outlets. I recently grabbed a 110 thinking it was a 220. There is a difference a 220 plug won’t fit a 110 and a 110 won’t fit a 220. If your 110 plugs fit the outlets you have the will work as long ...


12

Why 30A service? Because of provisioning. They are not able to provision 50A service at this time at this location. That is probably due to transformer or pole-line wire capacity in the neighborhood. Giving everyone 50/60A service means they would be oversubscribing their transformers and pole lines. This would necessitate a big capital expense ...


11

Grounding The bare copper (grounding) conductor is a safety system that provides an effective ground-fault current path, and should only ever have current it in the event of a fault. It provides a low resistance path back to the source, so that a fault can be cleared by the breaker (trip). Grounded (neutral) The grounded (neutral) conductor is a current ...


11

First you need to figure out the parts you need. Turn the power to the circuit off and remove the outlet. You need to figure out the gauge of the existing wiring. Since it is a 30 amp circuit, the wire should be 10 gauge, so my answer will mostly assume that. Now you can go to the store and buy a 20 amp outlet, a face plate, a 20 amp breaker, and a breaker ...


10

I've labeled your image, to help you understand what's going on. Off to the left, the grounding electrode conductor enters the box and terminates at the grounding bar. The feeder coming in the top of the disconnect has three wires, two ungrounded (hot) conductors, and a grounded (neutral) conductor. The two ungrounded (hot) conductors terminate at the ...


9

No, the plugs are different for different voltages. There are many different NEMA receptacles for various combinations of voltage and current, and also a "twist-lock" receptacles. Some common ones are: (From Wikipedia).


7

It's using the earth as a return path You really don't want to do that. Dirt doesn't conduct electricity very well. Your neutral is bonded to ground in your main panel. The power company's transformer also bonds neutral to ground at the pole, and all your neighbors have neutral-ground bonds like yours. The current is trying to return to source (neutral)...


7

Run all four wires Run a /3 cable (hot, hot, neutral, ground) to the receptacle location. For 110, you cap off a hot, and use the other hot, the neutral, and the ground for the receptacle. For 220, you can cap off the neutral and have 2 hots and a ground for a NEMA 6. If you want 110 & 220 together at some point, you can then land all four wires on a ...


7

You are running the dryer without full power, which will drastically increase the time it takes to dry clothes. If you're doing it on a timed basis, your clothes won't get dry. If you use it on a moisture sensor setting, it'll take way longer than otherwise. Additionally, you're using the dryer in a manner for which it was not intended. If it has any ...


7

Of course it's illegal to run power cords inside walls. National Electrical Code 400.8 rolls through the things you can't do with cord, and it's mostly a list of schemes to use them as a substitute for the permanent wiring of a structure. Nope, just nope. Data cables, on the other hand, can go right into the wall cavity. Punch a hole in the drywall and ...


7

3-prong vs 4-prong 3-prong connections lack ground; they bootleg ground off neutral and if neutral breaks, it guarantees the appliance is electrified. Appliance manufactures are terrified of losing sales (or much worse, getting customer returns!) because the installed power was not right for their appliance. That's why they lobbied to allow new 3-wire ...


6

The Ground wire is purely for safety, and carries no current during normal use. The Neutral wire is responsible for carrying all the "return" current the Hot wire provides to the electrical device. The neutral wire is not, however, a perfect conductor, and has some resistance. A 100 foot run of 14 awg wire, for instance, has 0.25Ω resistance. If an ...


6

My previous answer was a bit unclear, and a bit misleading. So I'm going to take another stab at it. As before, we'll start by looking at the secondary side of a single split-phase transformer. And again, the loads are represented by purple rectangles. Then we'll spit the circuit up into individual circuits, so we can take a closer look at each circuit. ...


6

This happened to me a couple of years ago. The builder (in 1972) apparently found some three-phase load centers really cheap and used those in place of a more normal 240V panel. He then wired two of the phases to one leg of the 240V circuit, the third phase to the other leg. Instead of an ABABAB... pattern on the comb that the breakers plug into, the pattern ...


5

For the second part: clothes dryers often have 240 V heaters and 120 V motors. Stoves use 240 V for the elements and 120 V for the light bulbs. These are both plug-in and need the neutral. My new electric hot-water heater is 240 V, not plug-in, and uses the old 120 V wiring. The electrician doing the install marked the "old" neutral with black tape at ...


5

In a 120/240V single split-phase system, there's two ungrounded (hot), one grounded (neutral), and in most cases one grounding conductor. Measuring between the two ungrounded (hot) conductors should yield 240 volts +- 5%. Measuring between either hot and neutral, should read 120 volts +- 5%. In the case of a NEMA 10-30. Each angled contact is one of the ...


5

First, you say your service is 100A, but those "main supply" wires look awfully small for 100A. They look a lot like #6 copper, which is only good for 60A tops. I would make sure the wires are appropriate for the main breaker. If they are inadequate, either upsize the wires or downsize the main breaker. This ... I hesitate to use the word "service panel"...


5

It's wired wrong. Someone connected both X and Y to the same 110V side of the electrical service. The only fix is to move either the X or Y wire to it's proper location, attached to the other leg of the electrical service. If the wiring problem is in the circuit breaker panel, it's because he used two single pole breakers instead of 1 double pole breaker. ...


5

Multi-wire branch circuits (MWBCs) must be on a 2-pole breaker, never ever a twin! Measure between the two hots, that must always read 240V. If it reads 0V, you are overloading the neutral. What you want to do is easy enough, though. Run yourself an 8/3 or 6/3 cable. In the service panel, land it on a 20A 2-pole breaker. At the other end, bring it ...


5

The reason they give the option of 40A or 50A is because 50A is a standard circuit size a builder would install for a wall oven or range. However, they also want you to know that if you are running wire specifically for this oven, 40A would suffice. For the sake of future upgrades, you should stick with 50A. You want to choose the most common "standard" ...


4

It may not provide a legal breaker for a 30-A 240-V circuit such as for a dryer that uses 240 V and 120 V because the tie bar only works for manual shut-off. If one breaker trips due to over-current, it is not assured to pull off the other breaker unless that is an explicitly stated property of this model breaker. I think the only use of tied 1-pole ...


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