29

ABSOLUTELY NOT!! This is NEVER an option. You MUST use some form of transfer switch or interlock, along with the proper male inlet. Also, a male-to-male cord is called a "suicide cord" for a reason.


24

You know what, I'm going to repeat the answer found here to the same question. Here's that answer, short and sweet and to the point: ABSOLUTELY NOT!! This is NEVER an option. You MUST use some form of transfer switch or interlock, along with the proper male inlet. Also, a male-to-male cord is called a "suicide cord" for a reason. A transfer switch/...


12

A transfer switch is the only way to go, it's only a few hundred bucks, the fee for an attorney for one hour. If you kill someone while back feeding your generator, the cost of a transfer switch is a drop in a bucket.


12

Yes, and I've done this myself. But not two outlets. The generator side one is an inlet. (These also come in a form-factor that is the same as an outlet). From the inlet, you use in-the-wall wiring to go to as many outlets and lights as makes sense for a single circuit. If you want 2 circuits, you can have 2 inlets, and plug each one into a ...


11

NO. What you are describing could potentially kill the folks that are trying to help restore power to your home. You're also creating a situation where you could easily overload your generator. To do this the right way, you'll need to install a transfer switch. Transfer switches allow you to switch between two source of electricity, while mitigating any ...


11

Don't worry about it Breakers have a certain latitude to them, and can run slightly above rating for a short time. That provides for motor starting and short term overloads. You're not supposed to plan to overload anyway You should be provisioning power for 125% of what you expect to actually draw. So if you plan for 6800 VA of actual load, you should ...


10

I live in southern New England, where we can usually see our natural disasters coming a few days in advance (snowstorms, hurricanes, etc.), so your considerations will be different, but I'll share what I do and what I've learned in three 5+ day outages over the past two years; it may give you some reference points. Fuel reserves I have a gasoline-powered ...


10

The transfer switch that MUST be used - as pointed out by Speedy - is essential that it be properly installed in conjunction with how the utility / house wiring is installed. The transfer switch and interlock mechanism is essential for the safety of both you and for the utility folks that may be working on downed utility lines. With out a proper interlock ...


10

You should replace the garage outlet with an inlet, such as this (Amazon, as an example). This way, you can use a standard male-female cord, either a standard extension cord or one made with the correct gauge of SO cord [Thanks, @EdBeal]. You avoid using a male-male cord which is so dangerous.


9

NO. You'll likely end up backfeeding the grid, which can easily lead to linemen being injured or killed. A generator should never be connected to the electrical system without a proper transfer switch being installed.


9

As gasoline evaporates it leaves a gummy varnish in the carburetor Gasoline sitting for three years in the float bowl of a carburetor will surely lead to some varnish. The hydrocarbons evaporate from the fuel and oxygen acts as an oxidation catalyst changing the remaining components into other compounds leaving varnish in their wake. Varnish will coat and ...


8

Yes, but not safely nor legally. There are plenty of resources available explaining the risks of doing so and the right way do it. Here's one: This is dangerous. It is an electrical code violation. It is illegal in most places. It is a fire hazard. The power created by your generator is generally greater than the rating for the receptacle, ...


8

What you describe won't work, and it's not safe for you (or anyone else) to do what you describe. If you have a single phase 120 volt generator and you need to supply power to a 240 volt split phase load, the safest way is to use a transformer with a 120 volt primary connected to the generator and a 120-0-120 volt secondary connected to the appliance.


7

I don't see any way this could be done safely, to code, etc. Problem being there's no way to interlock the MAIN and the Generator if they are on different panels. Without an interlock, it's quite simply not safe (and in a more nuanced view, if the power company becomes aware of it you may not get your power turned back on - they REALLY don't like that.) The ...


7

This already exists COTS The Tesla PowerWall is the most high visibility version, but there are competitors, and you could even knock one together out of golf cart batteries and inverters. What Tesla brings to the table is positively exquisite battery-management tech, which assures the PowerWall battery will have a very long life. "But I want a 5-...


6

The load center with the transfer switch (or "critical load panel") should have a circuit for each circuit that was specified to be connected to the generator. The original breakers no longer function because nothing is connected to them now; there is probably one dual-pole breaker feeding the critical load panel, and there should then be a breaker for ...


6

Good and affordable are both relative to many local factors. Your best bet is to look around you and see what fuel source is abundant. You'll also want to think about how often/long that resource is present during high power use periods as you'll need to store the power for later use which can rack up the price. There are areas of Michigan that are some of ...


6

I worked as a high voltage lineman for 30 years and have seen all kinds of squirrelly generator set ups. It is never a good idea to plug your generator into your home's wiring even if your turn your main off. NEC requires that a transfer switch be used. I have seen more than a few main breakers that had failed and were still on when they showed off. If you ...


6

Each switch has 3 positions, as labeled on the right hand side of the panel: GEN OFF and LINE. In their current position, the normal electrical feed is going to each circuit. If you move the switch to 'GEN' it will then take power from the generator. OFF lets you kill the circuit entirely (connects to neither line nor generator). If the panel was properly ...


5

Measuring the startup load is as easy as using a clamp on meter and turning the air handler on and off. The startup load will be high for a split second, then drop down to a steady load. Use Ohms Law to calculate the wattage. Watts/Voltage = Current As mentioned in my comment, the invertors peak load is a good indication of the invertors motor starting ...


5

Ok you wrote a book. Proposing all manner of third rate hackery. And what does it boil down to? You want to get 5000W out of your 5000W generator. Quick question. What is 240 x 21 ? By my math, it's 5040. There's your 5000W. You do get it out of the big NEMA L14-20 connector. I have no idea where you got 41A. I'm pretty sure you made ...


5

Buy a (petrol-fired) air compressor and pneumatic tools, or go for a bigger generator. (Good) Inverter can cost nearly as much as a generator, also remember that an inverter rated for 2kW has a substained rate of about half. I found on Amazon this 3kW inexpensive inverter, check if it may be good for you. Anyway, with an inverter it's important that the ...


5

Most inverter generators are a "good enough" sine wave. I think you're missing the point of inverter generators. The root problem is that regular gas generators cannot produce a "clean" sine wave because they change speeds slightly during operation. When the speed changes, the wave changes slightly. This isn't a problem for regular electrical devices like ...


5

Don't be ridiculous. You can't fix such outrageous safety hazards with stickynotes and a promise to be careful. Given your small generator, this is a 5 minute job. The supplies you'll need are 3 wire nuts, an appropriate length regular 20A extension cord, and a 3 foot 20A cord with male plug on one end, and bare wires on the other. When the power ...


4

On your water heater that uses 220V and has two elements, you will find that only one element is ever on at a time. When the top thermostat is satisfied, it will send power down to the lower thermostat. If you ever have a problem with the top thermostat or element you will have no hot water. If the lower thermostat or element has a problem you will find ...


4

I know this is an old question, but I wanted to mention another option if your main concern is the sump: a Sump Bump Battery Backup System. This is a system with a battery (about the size of a car battery) that charges off your AC power, and when main power goes off, the sump pump can run off of the battery. The model I have says that it can power a sump ...


4

Pulling the plug is quick, easy check if you have the right socket. Should be fairly clean, with a gap. BTW, my Gen has a separate on/off switch, yours? Next up would be some carb cleaner (after pulling air cleaner) Remove and clean carb bowl, float and orifice. Would also drain gas, put in car day after fillup, refill with new gas and treatment Next time,...


4

I would replace the spark plug and remove the air filter to make sure it isn't plugged up. Then, while the air filter is still removed, spray a little starting fluid into the carb through the hole under the air filter and start it up. If it runs for just a couple seconds and dies, that means the gas in your carb was probably bad. Starting it with the ...


4

I’m a proponent of portable generators. I have a gasoline unit though I’ll consider a propane unit when this one finally croaks. Permanent generators are great – if your structure is still standing when the disaster is over. The primary disadvantage of portable generators is they are subject to theft when you need them the most. A couple of fellows ...


4

If you already own the generator I say go for it and try it out. If the generator is anywhere decent then it will regulate the voltage more than enough for a motor so you won't over power the motor with voltage. If the generator can't handle it you will not harm the motor unless you are able to stall it for an extended period of time; the generator shouldn't ...


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