29

You know what, I'm going to repeat the answer found here to the same question. Here's that answer, short and sweet and to the point: ABSOLUTELY NOT!! This is NEVER an option. You MUST use some form of transfer switch or interlock, along with the proper male inlet. Also, a male-to-male cord is called a "suicide cord" for a reason. A transfer switch/...


29

ABSOLUTELY NOT!! This is NEVER an option. You MUST use some form of transfer switch or interlock, along with the proper male inlet. Also, a male-to-male cord is called a "suicide cord" for a reason.


27

Kris' comment is likely a good reference. Consider to perform a test by operating only one device. If the duration of normal operation increases, or normal operation continues throughout the test, it's an indication of too-low temperatures preventing the tank from allowing evaporation. The backfire of the generator is another indication of insufficient ...


27

Let's learn about energy: BTUs. Put 1 pound of water (just shy of a pint) on the stove and stick a thermometer in it. Turn the stove on, and watch the water warm up on the thermometer. You're watching energy in action. Every 1 degree of temperature rise means you added 1 "BTU" (British Thermal Unit) of energy into the water. So if it's 62F and you're ...


24

Ask your propane company to check the gas pressure anywhere in the system and then fire all appliances in the system, the low pressure side (after the second stage regulator) should stay above 11 inches of water column on a water gauge. If it goes below 11 inches look for an obstruction in the gas piping. I am a service technician at a propane company and ...


18

Found it! It’s the breaker. It’s in the wrong place, because somebody really worked to defeat the keying meant to force it into the right place. This is going to take a little explaining, though. Note your interlocked breaker. Normal 2-pole breakers are two complete breaker spaces wide. Each row of spaces has the opposite pole of power in it, so being 2 ...


14

A transfer switch is the only way to go, it's only a few hundred bucks, the fee for an attorney for one hour. If you kill someone while back feeding your generator, the cost of a transfer switch is a drop in a bucket.


12

Yes, and I've done this myself. But not two outlets. The generator side one is an inlet. (These also come in a form-factor that is the same as an outlet). From the inlet, you use in-the-wall wiring to go to as many outlets and lights as makes sense for a single circuit. If you want 2 circuits, you can have 2 inlets, and plug each one into a ...


11

Don't worry about it Breakers have a certain latitude to them, and can run slightly above rating for a short time. That provides for motor starting and short term overloads. You're not supposed to plan to overload anyway You should be provisioning power for 125% of what you expect to actually draw. So if you plan for 6800 VA of actual load, you should ...


11

Get a bigger subpanel You appear to have an automatic transfer switch, and the switching happens there. The 10? 12? space subpanel is just an ordinary run of the mill subpanel. It isn't special, it isn't matched to the transfer switch, or anything like that. However, it is the long experience of the experts on this forum that you will find the "only ...


11

I'd take a third option here. You clearly have a place to store fuel and someplace where you can run it so I would suggest a propane tank and stove. Cheap, very long shelf life so long as it's stored shielded from water. (The propane lasts forever, the tank can rust. Note that the tank has a 12 year expiry date--you won't be able to refill it after that, ...


10

I live in southern New England, where we can usually see our natural disasters coming a few days in advance (snowstorms, hurricanes, etc.), so your considerations will be different, but I'll share what I do and what I've learned in three 5+ day outages over the past two years; it may give you some reference points. Fuel reserves I have a gasoline-powered ...


10

The transfer switch that MUST be used - as pointed out by Speedy - is essential that it be properly installed in conjunction with how the utility / house wiring is installed. The transfer switch and interlock mechanism is essential for the safety of both you and for the utility folks that may be working on downed utility lines. With out a proper interlock ...


10

You should replace the garage outlet with an inlet, such as this (Amazon, as an example). This way, you can use a standard male-female cord, either a standard extension cord or one made with the correct gauge of SO cord [Thanks, @EdBeal]. You avoid using a male-male cord which is so dangerous.


10

This already exists COTS The Tesla PowerWall is the most high visibility version, but there are competitors, and you could even knock one together out of golf cart batteries and inverters. What Tesla brings to the table is positively exquisite battery-management tech, which assures the PowerWall battery will have a very long life. "But I want a 5-...


9

NO. You'll likely end up backfeeding the grid, which can easily lead to linemen being injured or killed. A generator should never be connected to the electrical system without a proper transfer switch being installed.


9

As gasoline evaporates it leaves a gummy varnish in the carburetor Gasoline sitting for three years in the float bowl of a carburetor will surely lead to some varnish. The hydrocarbons evaporate from the fuel and oxygen acts as an oxidation catalyst changing the remaining components into other compounds leaving varnish in their wake. Varnish will coat and ...


8

Yes, but not safely nor legally. There are plenty of resources available explaining the risks of doing so and the right way do it. Here's one: This is dangerous. It is an electrical code violation. It is illegal in most places. It is a fire hazard. The power created by your generator is generally greater than the rating for the receptacle, wire and breaker [...


8

What you describe won't work, and it's not safe for you (or anyone else) to do what you describe. If you have a single phase 120 volt generator and you need to supply power to a 240 volt split phase load, the safest way is to use a transformer with a 120 volt primary connected to the generator and a 120-0-120 volt secondary connected to the appliance.


8

As an HVAC technician, some of these answers you're getting are really bothering me. Do not wrap anything around your tanks, especially anything electrical. They are designed the way they are for a reason. You don't want those tanks holding extra heat in the summer. They need to be able to "breathe". I live in Canada and use propane as a heat source ...


8

Generally yes can use part of your range. Each burner is different, I've seen 8" burners use up to 2500 watts, smaller can be 1200 to 1500. I have even baked a pie. However I had to trick the oven by preheating on the broil setting since preheating on the bake setting uses both top and bottom elements and my biggest generator is a 5500.


8

Two identical 12V car batteries could deliver 24V, and two identical 120V~ transformers at the same net could deliver 240V~. But two 120V~ generators can not simply be connected in series to get 240V~. They must have a special interface/circuit to offer that option, because both generators must be locked to exactly the same frequency and must be locked to ...


7

I don't see any way this could be done safely, to code, etc. Problem being there's no way to interlock the MAIN and the Generator if they are on different panels. Without an interlock, it's quite simply not safe (and in a more nuanced view, if the power company becomes aware of it you may not get your power turned back on - they REALLY don't like that.) The ...


7

I worked as a high voltage lineman for 30 years and have seen all kinds of squirrelly generator set ups. It is never a good idea to plug your generator into your home's wiring even if your turn your main off. NEC requires that a transfer switch be used. I have seen more than a few main breakers that had failed and were still on when they showed off. If you ...


7

From the look of the burn on the stove it is not to do with pressure. The flame would be short or lazy this is not the case. With this going on all at one time it is something in the gas. Propane CO use alcohol in the gas in the winter to keep things from freezing up. This will cause some deep red in the flame but this would not make them to soot up that I ...


6

The load center with the transfer switch (or "critical load panel") should have a circuit for each circuit that was specified to be connected to the generator. The original breakers no longer function because nothing is connected to them now; there is probably one dual-pole breaker feeding the critical load panel, and there should then be a breaker for ...


6

Measuring the startup load is as easy as using a clamp on meter and turning the air handler on and off. The startup load will be high for a split second, then drop down to a steady load. Use Ohms Law to calculate the wattage. Watts/Voltage = Current As mentioned in my comment, the invertors peak load is a good indication of the invertors motor starting ...


6

Each switch has 3 positions, as labeled on the right hand side of the panel: GEN OFF and LINE. In their current position, the normal electrical feed is going to each circuit. If you move the switch to 'GEN' it will then take power from the generator. OFF lets you kill the circuit entirely (connects to neither line nor generator). If the panel was properly ...


6

You absolutely need breakers for the 5-20 and 6-20 receptacles - can't connect those directly to a 40A breaker with any hint of safety. And all the outputs would benefit from GFCI protection, given that you plan outside use; clearly required on the 5-20s and highly advisable on the other outlets. So, you need a subpanel, at least. Given a 50A input connector,...


6

You cannot just use an adapter and hook your generator up to your house electrical panel. You need a transfer switch to isolate your service from the power company when your generator is in use. Installing one can be pretty complicated and permits are usually involved. Unless you are very knowledgeable about what's involved, getting professional help would ...


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