108

Stop, turn off the gas, ventilate the house, and hire a pro. If you applied teflon tape to a flare fitting, you are NOT the person to be installing your gas range. You fundamentally don't understand what you are doing, and doing this wrong can blow up your house. That tends to impair the "learn from your mistakes" method of learning. This is not the place ...


30

That cable, as is, will tend to "bite people". It also has damage that could increase resistance there causing that spot in the cable to get hot. Continued flexing will worsen the wire damage and the heating. An electrical-tape repair will work temporarily, but I would not resell it like that. The right way is take your time and find a gray power cord ...


27

Kris' comment is likely a good reference. Consider to perform a test by operating only one device. If the duration of normal operation increases, or normal operation continues throughout the test, it's an indication of too-low temperatures preventing the tank from allowing evaporation. The backfire of the generator is another indication of insufficient ...


27

Let's learn about energy: BTUs. Put 1 pound of water (just shy of a pint) on the stove and stick a thermometer in it. Turn the stove on, and watch the water warm up on the thermometer. You're watching energy in action. Every 1 degree of temperature rise means you added 1 "BTU" (British Thermal Unit) of energy into the water. So if it's 62F and you're ...


25

Repeating the comments : Do NOT use any pipe dope or tape on flare connections . They are metal to metal seals and anything on the metal sealing surface can cause a leak. Pipe threads (tapered) require dope/tape to get a good seal. I analysed a house fire once and the primary cause was a leak caused by dope on a flare fitting.


24

Ask your propane company to check the gas pressure anywhere in the system and then fire all appliances in the system, the low pressure side (after the second stage regulator) should stay above 11 inches of water column on a water gauge. If it goes below 11 inches look for an obstruction in the gas piping. I am a service technician at a propane company and ...


20

Total, utter, male-bovine-derived-organic-fertilizer. The cabinet isn't helping it cool any (and is almost certainly less ventilation space than the manufacturer requires), but the freezer really can't have much effect, being on the other side of the cabinet. The stove on the other side gets far hotter than the outside of the freezer does - so why wasn't ...


20

Having had to manhandle quite a few appliances on my own I would do this. Put the truck tray down. Tip the appliance over until the top just rests on the edge of the tray. Lift the back of the appliance and push forward. Use cardboard under it if you don't want to damage the side. Once it is all in, stand the appliance up. This way you are never deadlifting ...


19

It won't work. Your 220V (really probably 240) outlets will actually have 0V, not 110V. The reason for this is that normally the 220V outlets make their 220 by taking both 110 lines that are out of phase with each other, such that while 1 is at +110, the other is at -110 for a difference of 220. Since the power company bridged one of the 110 lines to ...


18

That's fine, they are nominally the same. 120v is utility supply defined by ANSI C84.1. 115v is point of use desired voltage, generally specified by NEMA. One is 120v +5/-10% tolerance, the other is 115V +/-10%. NEMA 5-15 is a standard receptacle used throughout a US home. This document says the cabinet draws 2.0 amps, should easily be used on any nearly ...


16

The only real answer is to fix the root plumbing issue. You are basically begging for problems by not fixing it. This can do serious damage to your house over time. There might even be health issues if the traps are not holding water (water flowing out of them due to incorrect slope) and sewer gasses are escaping into your house, not to mention the ...


16

Yes, the most common solution is to sell your US appliances and buy new in India. The difficulties and expense of getting transformers etc and making it impossible for others to connect the wrong things is not worth the time or expense. But your money your choice, I’m basing this on the decisions others have made... And I do have a 230v to 110v transformer ...


15

It's called an insulation blanket and its main purpose is to muffle the noise made during operation. Since it's usually made of fiberglass, it provides some heat insulation too. You don't need it, but you'll probably find the extra noise to be annoying. Try the dishwasher without it, and if you can't live with the noise, replace it.


15

I have a local delivery service and use a hand truck and the sides of my tray as ramps to load and unload large furniture on my own. It only takes a second or two to wheel modern fridges and most other items up this way. For anything requiring a dolly I keep a light, cheapo steel block and tackle in my kit, which were left over from a kid's flying fox, but ...


14

I had the exact same problem and rather than removing the wood from under the counter, I totally removed the feet from the bottom of the washer and that gave me an extra 5/8". I put some thin furniture felt pads on the corners of the washer and it slid right into the space. If that doesn't float your boat, the Dremel with a routing bit will be accurate ...


13

DO NOT connect the ground wire to the grounded (neutral) conductor, as this could lead to current flowing through the body of the dryer (and potentially through you). The installation guide for the dryer will have wiring instructions for both 3, and 4 wire configurations. Check the manufacturers documentation for proper wiring, but I would say the first ...


13

I've used the following method to make obnoxious sounds coming from home appliances and toys much quieter: Find where the sound comes from. Usually there's a little grill or perforated plastic that covers the loudspeaker or piezo inducer. Tape over it with a transparent office tape. I sometimes do two layers in cross-hatch pattern if sounds are very loud. ...


12

It depends. The proper procedure would of course be to replace the cord, but from a safety perspective, insulating tape will work. It may be against regulation, and if you have kids or pets around it may be unadvisable. The main problem is that tape tends to sag and move over time. A better solution than electrical tape would be either zipper tube, which is ...


12

That broken pipe has let all the refrigerant escape, so it will no longer work. Compared to the cost of a new one, the repair will likely be more expensive given the time, tools and materials involved.


10

Manufacture mentioned there is no way to silence sound. Inspired by Haimg's advice, I disconnected one of pins from the speaker module off of the components board.


9

It's a bracket, with a U-shaped slot. Depending on the model, it is screwed either to the floor, or to both the floor and the wall behind the oven. You slide the oven's rear foot underneath the bracket, and it holds the oven in place in case you step on the door while it's open, preventing your pot of boiling water from sliding off the top onto you. ...


9

Yes, it is a typical for the gas stovetops to light all of the burners even when only one is needed. Note that this applies to stovetops that do not have a standing pilot light. The oven often will have its own ignitor that operates independently of the stovetop. The reason for this may be in order to reduce the complexity of the stovetop design. With all ...


9

Look for another identifier besides color such as a stripe or rib on one of the two other wires. That will be the Neutral wire. Make sure it connects to the Wide blade on the plug. Is this because it is AC? No, if it isn't so identified, you are dealing with a cheap knockoff pigtail that probably belongs in the waste bin. In the 120V single phase world, ...


9

A nearly 40 year old power cord is going to be nasty. Dust, grease, possibly cracked insulation internally, possibly asbestos insulation if the "original" cord was itself recycled. All are fine unless you disturb the cord. Pulling the stove out disturbs the cord. Pulling out a stove is a fairly major operation, I would take the opportunity to completely ...


9

Strangely, page 26 of the manual mentioned in the question says the following: Does that not work, or only apply to some subset of this model? Maybe there is some trick to get it right (sometimes these translated messages lack certain clarity). I would guess that it probably resets if power is lost. I would not recommend physically cutting any wire to ...


9

Motorcycle-style ratchets don't do well for this. Their levers are short, meaning you don't have much pull, and when the spool gets full of strap you're done until you reset, which means you need to temporarily support the load. I suggest looking for a ditch and some 2x10 lumber, then just wheel it up.


8

The cover of the detergent cup is not opening when its supposed to. If you need to expose the cup to investigate, it is not opening at all. The spring loaded cover is held closed over the detergent by a little catch. There is a solenoid in the door that pulls on the catch, letting the cover spring open. This happens at the start of the main wash cycle. The ...


8

Those straps aren't rated for straight lifting, and I wouldn't recommend that anyway. Ramps are the way to go, and I would combine ramps with those straps, along with some sort of friction modifier such as the appliance's wheels or bars of Ivory soap. Just expect it to fail worst case at any time, watch what you are doing to assure it doesn't, and move an ...


8

A "decent surface area" would lead me to drill and pin it using some metal dowels as well as using glue. That should help spread the stress caused by using it and make the repair last longer.


8

As an HVAC technician, some of these answers you're getting are really bothering me. Do not wrap anything around your tanks, especially anything electrical. They are designed the way they are for a reason. You don't want those tanks holding extra heat in the summer. They need to be able to "breathe". I live in Canada and use propane as a heat source ...


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