Hot answers tagged

21

Yes, reversing them would be a bad thing. The cold water should be entering the bottom of the tank, the hot output at the top: I'd insist that the plumber fix this. But if they won't, I'd suggest picking up a pipe cutter, some sharkbite connectors, and just fix it yourself. Shouldn't take more than a half hour to do so.


10

RTFM After reading the user manual for this heater, as per National Electrical Code. National Electrical Code 2011 ARTICLE 110 Requirements for Electrical Installations I. General 110.3 Examination, Identification, Installation, and Use of Equipment. (B) Installation and Use. Listed or labeled equipment shall be installed and used in ...


8

If your carbon monoxide alarm is going off, you need to assume that there's actually carbon monoxide in dangerous levels in that area. If the heater is electric it probably shouldn't be emitting CO but maybe there's a manufacturing defect that's causing the heating element or plastic to burn. CO is lethal and totally undetectable by people, so if the alarm ...


7

These heaters need what the UL-approved instructions say they need. However this heater is rated for a 20.8A draw. For heaters, we must provision 125% of that, or 26 amps. That is too much for a 20A circuit, and appropriate for 30A. 10/2 will get the job done for this one task. But it'll do more for your resale if you use 10/3, because that will ...


6

The outlet contacts may be too dirty to carry a heavy load. Or they may be loose. Or the wires to the outlet may be loose either at the outlet or the in the breaker/fuse panel. I would recommend not using this outlet for anything until the point of cause is determined and corrected.


6

A larger tank does not cost more energy. The only thing that costs energy is when the water cools - and that depends only on the surface area, not the amount of water in the tank. (Mathematically volume increases by the 3rd power, but surface area only by the 2nd power.) So to save energy add extra insulation around the tank. Reducing the amount of water in ...


6

Bad thermocouple - it is supposed to sense the presence of a flame, and turn off the gas if it is on, but nothing is getting hot. Last one I replaced was less than $10 at home depot, it is held in with only a screw or two, and less than an hour of work, including the beer after fixing my friends water heater. Looks like this, they are pretty much universal....


6

Check all the supply valves to ensure they are open. It is not uncommon for old valves (particularly gate valves) to break whilst operating, leaving you with a low or no-flow situation (sometimes called a "dropped wedge"). This would require you to replace the suspect valve. If you did a DIY install, were any of the valves particularly corroded or hard to ...


5

The first thing to do is verify where the leak is occuring. It could be occuring higher up and just dripping from the fitting (though it is very likely that it is the fitting leaking). Dry the entire pipe off and then watch for water. Assuming it is the compression fitting, the first thing I'd try is tightening it by 1/8 to 1/4 of a turn. As gregmac ...


5

I assume you are in the USA. The heater is probably a pure 240V load with no need for the neutral (white) wire. you should simply cap the white wire with a wire nut and tuck it back into the electrical box.


5

TL; DR: When the temperature is colder outside, your cold water is colder so you have to use more hot water for the same shower temperature. Facts: A shower head puts out 2.5 gallons per minute (GPM) (or close to it). To get the temperature you want, you have to mix hot and cold water. In the summer, the "cold" water temp is much warmer than it is in the ...


5

Instead of a space heater, try some pipe heating cable. This is a simple electric resistance heater that is designed to be wrapped around pipes in order to prevent freezing. The good ones have a thermostat built-in, so they'll only kick on if necessary. You wrap the cable around your pipes, apply insulation over the wrapped pipes, and plug it in. This will ...


5

Heat tape will keep the hose from freezing (where it's attached) but there are other freezing risks... e.g. where are the pipes coming from? Do they go into the uninsulated wall? Also there is still water inside the washing machine itself that can freeze. Frankly installing a washing machine in a cold, unheated garage was not a great idea. I think you need ...


5

Here's my guess. The left pipe goes to the hot water faucet of a fixture with a common hot+cold spout. Since there is no hot water pressure at that faucet, when you open both faucets some of the cold water comes out the spout and some flows backward through the hot water faucet and spills out the left pipe. The left pipe may also connect to the hot faucets ...


4

Since your question says hot water, not steam escaping from overflow, my first thought would be to check for a faulty high pressure relief valve. This is the cylinder with the little lift switch usually mounted atop the tank with the drain line attached.


4

While the lower end hotair guns often only have one or two settings, the more expensive models offer variable increments (I've seen units that do 50 degrees and a commenter mentioned 10 degrees; each model will be different so review the specs). The temperature spec gives the output temperature. Start low and increase the temperature as needed to melt the ...


4

For starters, I'd suggest you shut down the heater, drain it completely, and replace both electrodes. The danger with a water heater this old is that in draining it and dislodging sediment within you could expose small leaks. At 16 years old, I hate to say it, but you'll probably find it more efficient just to replace it.


4

Are you sure the AC isn't actually a heat pump? A heat pump looks about the same as an AC, but in winter it runs in reverse to pump heat into, instead of out of, the house. Examine the markings on the outdoor unit and see if it's a heat pump. If so, this is normal.


4

Our old apartment had this. I asked the landlord why, and he simply stated that if it wasn't there, all the vertical space above the heater would be wasted. Now there's a shelf there. I found it handy to place hats and gloves there during the winter to dry them off faster.


4

We ended up bleeding the radiators, upping the pressure, and replacing the thermocouple. After all of that, we discovered that flames had been shooting out of the front of the boiler and melted half of the valve, messing up the electronics for the pilot light. We ended up replacing the entire boiler since it was 35 years old anyway, but the reason for the ...


4

The most important issue in a portable heater, even before the issue of heating is safety. Dangers involve tipping, brushing a hot surface, things falling into, in or on it. This risk is even more pronounced in a kitchen which is a busy place (unlike a quite reading room). People move about, often quickly and carry (and drop) things. While your particular ...


4

I usually encourage DIY projects, but when it comes to gas applications, I have to strongly caution you to consider using a licensed gas installer to connect an on demand water heater. Nothing in a home is more dangerous than gas and it MUST be installed correctly and pressure tested. Venting the exhaust is extremely important as well, and a mistake can be ...


4

Probably not the answer you want to hear, but the manufacturer of your heater would most likely prohibit the alteration of air flow into and out of the unit. Doing so would void the industry safety certifications required for manufacturers, the warranty, and would probably not be safe. Additionally, all wall heaters have minimum clearance requirements for ...


4

It sounds to me like a restriction at the regulator, not the control valve. You mentioned that the previous owner had done some work on it, make sure that he/she did not replace the regulator with one that does not deliver the design flow/pressure. In this case, adequate flow/pressure depends on proper regulator back pressure setting (they are rated in "...


4

NO. If this electric heat circuit is on a 30A breaker then ALL the wiring on the circuit must be #10cu (or larger). Even if it feeds just one heater.


4

What you have in these pictures is a massive code violation, fire hazard as well as an electrocution hazard. This must be rectified first. Leaving this mess intact is negligent even if you cover it with a mile of electrical tape. You need to put all of this cable into a listed electrical box. Since we cant see the conductor size, I'm just going to ...


4

I would suggest a timer like this. Additional start/stop pins can be added if you decide on adding a second on off time (or more) and you can always flip the over ride to the On position. This way your water will be hot in the morning instead of having to wait after you turn it back on. The only problem is if there is a power outage you would need to ...


4

No problem, the water will just pass through if you turn off the gas supply.


4

There's an absolutely fantastic heater called a wall furnace. It is a proper furnace that mounts in a wall, and is either one-sided or two-sided. You could mount a 2-sided unit on an interior joist wall. Or you could mount a 1-sided unit on an exterior wall by spacing it out from the wall 4", this would let you put a jog in the stack pipe and penetrate ...


4

Quick answer is that 240v only requires two wires (black and red). Four wires would be power coming in, and the switched power from the thermostat going out. If there are 6 wires, then power comes in, and the thermostat controls two pairs, or one pair is power out to another thermostat and one pair out is to a heater. How the old thermostats were hooked ...


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