22

You want an high-efficiency heat exchanger. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_recovery_ventilation Basically, you pipe in fresh air, but have it cooled before, while you heat out the air that is going out. It's typically installed on central hvac systems. It needs maintenance to be efficient and it is quite often overlooked by contractors as it's hard to ...


20

That's a really high CO₂ level. You need to figure out what is causing it and fix that, it's not normal. Gas fired appliances with leaky vents are the most likely suspects — hot water heater, dryer? (Probably not your furnace, since its summer!) In the meantime I would seriously open some windows and suck it up, that's dangerously high if accurate.


12

In a properly configured home, the return air ducting is the exit path for airflow. There's no significant pressure buildup in any room regardless of door position. In older homes without return ducting, or vents solely in common areas, the return air path is indeed through or around the door. Still, pressure buildup is extremely small unless the door is ...


9

If you're feeling lightheaded/out of breath in the basement, I'd stay out of there until it's well ventilated and never enter the area without someone on the outside to monitor you and call for help if needed (but that person should not enter the area). If it were my basement, I'd call the fire department to check for Carbon Monoxide and/or combustible gas ...


9

The article that you linked to in your first bullet seems to be aimed at people who happen upon asbestos during day-to-day life by accident, one-off cases like in your experience. It is not meant to provide a guideline for people who work in the asbestos abatement industry. The accepted answer linked to in your second bullet (and the question itself) is ...


7

A typical interior doorway has a gap of about 3mm along each side and the top, and often 5-10mm underneath. This gives an area of around 20,000 mm^2, or about the same area as 150mm (6") duct. Unless you take action to prevent airflow through these gaps (e.g. installing draft excluders or an automatic door closer that pushes the door tightly against the ...


6

I'm not entirely sure if this will be useful in your situation - but the way your typical smoke detector works is by measuring the radioactive decay, apparently Americum is at least used in some of them. But I just learned something new (thanks, Wikipedia!) - apparently some smoke detectors use optical sensors! So you should be able to do something ...


5

The dryer vent and the combustion vent are one and the same. If you try to use the dryer vent for heating you will have two issues, first excess moisture and second carbon monoxide. Gas dryers get their efficiency by directly venting the combustion into the damp clothes which then by the way of evaporation drastically reduces the temp of the heat. It ...


5

Asbestos removal is very much the job for experts. If there is a chance that it has become airborne, you really need to call in a licensed professional to evaluate and, if necessary, remediate. This is not a do-it-yourself project.


5

I had a house I purchased that had previous residents that were very heavy smokers. Everything in the house was covered in a yellow brown film. Steps I had to take to remove the smell. All hard surfaces were washed twice with TSP in hot water. This was necessary because the yellow gunk was so thick that the first washing just could not get it all off. ...


4

Lungs weren't made to filter out latex aerosols, organic solvents, urethane, epoxy fumes. Any time you're spray painting, you should at least have a dust filter. Coughing up paint may be something you put up with in an unregulated factory, but given that masks that do the job aren't really that expensive anymore, your lung capacity will be a lot better when ...


4

What type of air condition are you using? Some only cool the air inside, while others use fresh air from outside. In a cafe or club there are norms about how much fresh air the air condition must put inside during a given period of time. I would suggest the following: measure the CO₂ concentration outside to compare it with your inside CO₂ concentrations. ...


3

I would do both plants and an air filter. You can purchase a reasonable sized air filter for $89 on Amazon (Honeywell 17000-S QuietCare True HEPA Air Purifier, 200 sq ft) that does a pretty good job of helping clear up the air. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000050AQ5/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1 I use this one because it's large ...


3

Having done 3D printing with ABS myself, I'm familiar with this challenge. You need to exhaust the fumes--that's the long and short of it. Locate the printer near a window, open the window, and have a fan blowing air out the window every time you use the printer. Crack a window on the other side of your house for make-up air purposes. Or print with PLA, ...


3

Look into a downdraft table that you can exhaust outside. These are typically used for sanding or painting but the premise is the same. The table is perforated and sucks air down and then out to a dust collector or other exaust mechanism. You would place the printer on the table and ensure the exaust is running while you print.


3

It depends on the home, and the system. Neither of which you've provided much information. Older homes are usually drafty enough to provide adequate combustion air, so dedicated intake are not required. Modern homes tend to be sealed up much tighter, and often require air intakes. Sometimes systems are installed in a utility closet, or other space where ...


3

The biggest culprit is likely environmental: your dry Colorado mountain air and low humidity. We have the same problem south of you in New Mexico. Raising your interior humidity will help a lot. There are several approaches, ranging from using a humidifier constantly (cheap up front, expensive to run over time) to sealing your house up airtight and using an ...


3

"Air quality" is an ambiguous phrase. This baby monitor that you bought, on what basis does it determine the air quality in the room? Carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, radon, particulates, pollen, VOCs, smoke? There are literally thousands of things that can affect air quality. I don't think I would get too worried about a baby monitor, that doubles as an ...


3

Filters only work if the air has to go through them. The filter has air resistance and a gap doesn't, so if you leave a 1" gap, a disproportionate amount of air will flow through the hole, effectively making the situation even worse. If it is a choice of a smaller filter or nothing, at least do something like glue or tape a cardboard filler piece to the ...


3

You could Have an HVAC company install an electronic air cleaner with a charcoal pre or post filter in that window. This would remove most if not all of the smell, but would cost a significant amount. You could also install an exhaust fan in that window if there is another window you could open to allow air in for the required ventilation, say from the front ...


3

3 layers of pegboard (pierced hardboard), internal surfaces painted black, with the middle layer offset, and spacers between the layers. This should provide little or no straight path for light, but allow ventilation.


2

Yes, adding a transfer grille or jump duct will be the easiest and most effective solution. It can be done in a way to minimize transfer of sound between rooms (see links below). Adding a return to the master bedroom doesn't guarantee that the supply/return to the master bedroom will become balanced—the resulting pressure may still be positive or even ...


2

Asbestos is bad for humans but a casual encounter should not worry you. Yes once it gets in its there forever probably but so do many other things


2

Local painters union requires vapor masks for all spray painting, they suggest dust masks while rolling, and no requirement when brushing. Source I had 10 painters working for me on an apartment rehab last summer. Having said that I wear a dust mask while spraying and nothing all other times.


2

After reviewing your pictures and the promotional brochure that you posted, I am fairly confident that your system does not take in "fresh" air from outside. The outside air is used only to cool the compressor/condenser unit outside, there is no duct work bringing air from outside to inside. The inside and outside units are connected only by refrigerant ...


2

Adding a filter onto an HVAC unit that's not designed for one will almost certainly cause problems... definitely with efficiency, possibly mechanical problems as well. If your model does not have a built-in filter you would probably be better served by getting a standalone air filter. However, many units do have at least a basic filter built-in, and you may ...


2

Carbon dioxide is only a possibility, you should take in account there are other various gases that could prevent the match to ignite. In fact maybe there many gases that contribute to the lack of oxygen in your cellar. You should first do a qualitative analysis before performing a quantitative analysis. Here I have wrote a little list of gasses with the ...


2

A bit of Environmental Health & Safety perspective: Normal air has 21% oxygen, and anything below 19.5% is considered IDLH ("Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health"). The real danger is not that you would immediately pass out, but rather that your thinking is impaired and you may not be capable of removing yourself from the area. A match will burn well ...


2

There are many options to improve air quality in your apartment. I did some research when I moved into my place last year, and learned that there are many indoor air quality issues that people don't realize may be harmful, like toxins from house cleaners or chemicals that expel from building materials, air conditioners, even electronics. A window fan that ...


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