30

WHAT...??? You can do this. You’re working on the outside of the house so you don’t need a tent or fans. (They have the fans going the wrong way anyway. If you were working inside the house, you want negative pressure not positive pressure. This is obviously not their forte.) Keep it wet and try to do it without breaking it. Stop by an asbestos abatement ...


21

No. Hire a licensed, EPA certified asbestos abatement company. This is not a DIY job. Asbestos exposure isn't like a disease or injury after which you heal. The risk is cumulative: the fibers stay in your lungs until you die of lung cancer or die of something else. (Legal) disposal will be difficult, since your local landfill probably won't accept it. ...


17

OK, let's take about 10 steps back... If you bought this home from a prior owner, did you hire a home inspector? Did that home inspector mention anything about the possibility of asbestos-bearing material? Asbestos in drywall is one I haven't heard before, but before its dangers became known it was virtually everywhere, so it wouldn't surprise me in the ...


17

I used to be a certified asbestos remover in Europe, where we have pretty stringent asbestos removal laws. Usually it's only legal for a person to remove things alone under a certain quantity(3 big sheets of roofing for example) but at a certain volume or with certain materials(cloth, prone to breaking/turning to dust) you're required to hire a company who ...


14

The asbestos shingles on a 1920’s house were typically applied over the original wood siding in the 50’s or 60’s. Thus, there is more than likely excellent existing siding hiding beneath. There is a small tool specially made for removing nails - five bucks at the hardware store. The siding to be removed has been painted many times and this coating minimizes ...


12

I've been in the industry for over 40 years and have never heard of asbestos in the old wiring insulation. It is oil-impregnated cloth I believe. The more pressing problems that I see from your photo are that the cloth insulation may start to crumble off the copper conductors when you manipulate the wires and that the junction box appears to be overfilled. ...


11

Asbestos in building materials is generally only a concern where the material is friable i.e. brittle and crumbly. You haven't said, but if the "panel" was removed as a unit, then almost certainly very little asbestos was released. If, on the other hand, the panel were pulverized and destroyed to the point where a lot of dust was created, that may be cause ...


9

The article that you linked to in your first bullet seems to be aimed at people who happen upon asbestos during day-to-day life by accident, one-off cases like in your experience. It is not meant to provide a guideline for people who work in the asbestos abatement industry. The accepted answer linked to in your second bullet (and the question itself) is ...


9

To answer the question of danger: The danger of asbestos is the airborne fibers. When they get in the air, they can eventually get into your lungs, where they become lodged and never leave. Over time (long time) and continued exposure, it can eventually turn into cancer. So, for asbestos to be dangerous, there are a few variables: it must be airborne (...


9

No. That looks like polyisocyanurate: Asbestos looks like any of these, depending on which form was used in what kind of location:


9

I don't think the vacuum is ruined, it just needs to be cleaned properly. Since it is a shop vac just empty the dust out into a safe container, clean the inside of the vacuum out with some household cleaner, and then change the filter. You should be good to go after that.


9

No, that is fiberglass. When it comes to asbestos insulation, it is found only in loose fill types, and in a solid board configuration. Asbestos was never used in a batt form of insulation which is what your picture is of. https://www.thespruce.com/how-to-identify-dangerous-asbestos-insulation-4119906


8

As a certified home inspector I will give you some more specific advice from a Buyer's point of view. If the inspector suspected asbestos, then this warning should be taken seriously. At this point in the house buying negotiations, it would be wise to insist the "Seller" have the material sampled by a licensed tech and tested by a certified lab with a copy ...


7

Often, people talk about “old-fashioned horse-hair plaster,” but the binding agent in old plaster walls was more commonly cattle hair. -searshomes.org I am reasonably sure it's not asbestos.


6

"Asbestos in the ceiling' is rather vague. Are they referring to the ceiling itself? Popcorn texturing? Insulation above the ceiling? As for the danger level of asbestos, it all depends on if it is airborne or not. In its solid state, it's harmless. It's only when it's friable and turns to dust and you inhale it does it become dangerous. Even then, note ...


6

No, it is plaster with animal hairs in it, probably pig or cow hair. To determine if there are asbestos fibers inside the plaster, break it apart and examine with magnifying glass. Asbestos is a fine white fiber. It looks like this: The fibers on the right are asbestos, those on the left are animal hairs. Asbestos fibers will be colorless, very fine and ...


5

Asbestos has been banned in Europe for over a decade you will be fine. Blue and brown asbestos was been banned since 1985 and white asbestos since 1999 (resolving and complete end by 2005) so 2008 (manufactured or sold) gypsum board could not legally have asbestos. The only danger you'd face is the possibly older insulation behind it or you end up shaking ...


5

Since you've already got it in a bag, send the bag off to a test lab. It's the only way to know for sure.


5

Asbestos removal is very much the job for experts. If there is a chance that it has become airborne, you really need to call in a licensed professional to evaluate and, if necessary, remediate. This is not a do-it-yourself project.


5

Depending on where you live abstos abatement can be a DIY project but to answer your question if not disturbed and or encapsulated with paint there is no risk. The risk comes from disturbing it. Things like popcorn ceiling texture many times had asbestos in it. What is the risk to remove asbestos? If done with the proper equipment and decontamination ...


5

Be as safe as possible and be as fast as possible. If it is legal to do it then: Do not do it by yourself. Ask a couple friends to help you. Do it all at once, no unnecessary breaks. All of you wear appropriate protection. Do not hesitate to ask the specialist. No free skin. Use some soft and tough guard between the pliers and the tile. Paint the tiles to ...


5

This cloth covered wire is very common and not an asbestos product. With that said in some cases where ceiling were sprayed with popcorn texture or the wire pulled through an area with asbestos the cloth holds onto the fibers. We tested some for a owner that wanted everything tested and did get a positive on one or 2 sections but the insulation on the wires ...


5

Even if there is asbestos present in that box, I'd say the hazards of messing with the wiring are far greater than the asbestos exposure, you don't develop asbestosis from the trace exposure that would be possible here. A little reading of materials readily available online may give your concerns some perspective. The insulation on old cloth covered ...


4

I dug up a statistic that 2-10% of individuals with heavy occupational exposure contract an asbestos related disease- and it doesn't show up for 30-50 years. This is things like shipyard workers from world war two. Permissible amounts are 1 fiber per cc, so you are breathing thousands per day anyway- it's all around us. Rules for asbestos workers are ...


4

You are far more likely to die from worrying about asbestos than from asbestos. I just finished dealing with the same thing you are. Where possible, I installed engineered flooring and underlayment over the linoleum. They look killer! :) My mother, a retired cyto-technologist, kind of laughed at me about my own asbestos concerns. http://fumento.com/...


4

A "C" (or perhaps "[" is better) shaped shelf could sit under and behind the couch, keeping it no more than an inch or two (even less if it was metal plate for the section behind the top edge of the couch) off the wall, and holding the projector above the couch without needing any attachment into the walls. Not exactly what I'm thinking of (not having much ...


4

How about instead of mounting it to the wall, use a couple vertical tension rods from floor to ceiling and connect shelves to those? See this IKEA hack: http://lifehacker.com/5890036/mount-your-hdtv-on-a-set-of-floor+to+ceiling-poles-keep-your-wall-hole+free Oh, actually I see Johnny answered with a similar post. But while the link he gave works, the links ...


4

You are paying a premium for what you want. Businesses can and do charge more for doing jobs they don't want to do, to do them differently than they would typically do, or to work with someone they see as difficult. At the same time, no one is forcing you to do any of this. If you want someone else to do the work, get multiple bids and take the one you ...


4

Nobody can tell you whether or not that is ACM (asbestos containing material) by the pictures. You have to send it to a lab to know for sure. Does it look like other ACM I have encountered? Yes Will it hurt you if you wet it, bag it, and throw it away? No Could it hurt you if you keep it laying around on your desk taking pictures of it and handling it? ...


4

I used to work for an environmental company where we did asbestos management plans. There is no way to identify something as asbestos without a lab test. The only other thing to do is figure out when the substance was put in. For instance in the US asbestos was banned in 1989 so we know what any construction after that date does not need to be tested.


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