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6

The air handler, blower, is designed to blow a certain amount of air over the cooling coils which in turn converts the refrigerant back to a gas from a liquid. It can only get the correct amount of air if all the returns and supplies are installed, otherwise the blower will not function as designed and can ice up the coils. This affects the compressor ...


6

Split machines do not have, normally, large tubes inside the walls. The tubes between the inside unit (evaporator) and the outside unit (condenser) are only carrying refrigerant and so are small. You would need a different system to replace the air inside with fresh air from outside with perhaps temperature and humidity control. All the existing system does ...


4

They are correct the flow will not be correct but it will not hurt the system if fully functional , it may not cool as well because the lack of restriction across the evaporator. In a way they are separate but the amount of heat removed at the evaporator or inside coil affects the condenser the outside coil, if the fan is not functional on the inside unit it ...


4

There are two separate issues going on here: There is a general problem that many distributors of technical products (whether HVAC, electrical, plumbing) are reluctant to sell to DIY. That is a combination of varying amounts of: Don't want to provide the pre-sales help/training/support that typical ordinary users would require compared to trained ...


3

You need an axial compressor, which (despite the name) is used to move gas/vapor (but can also function as a compressor in a closed system). A common name for this is a fan. For your purposes, it could be as simple as an in-line electric fan installed in the duct, at the duct outlet to atmosphere, or in the "container" at the duct inlet. Example:


3

The problem with venting the AC into the garage is that you are then venting the garage into your workout room. I'd worry about CO poisoning. Garages are typically air sealed from the rest of the house to prevent and CO from moving from the garage into the house. I can't imagine a damper that I would trust enough to vent the AC into the garage and take the ...


3

Use a Window fan, blowing inwards. Presumably something simple and easily available would suit your purposes most easily. The best type of fan/blower for the purpose (a "squirrel-cage blower") is not the most commonly available or easily self-installed, but the commonly available axial fan (or two) in a window mount will likely serve the purpose, ...


2

Directing air from outside compressor into your attic would reduce the air flow from your compressor and probably decrease the cooling ability of it. A better solution would be to install an attic fan that vented to the outside. The problem with that is that you suck in humid air from the outside. If you've got good insulation on the attic floor why is the ...


2

Most central HVAC systems have an “outside air intake vent”. This vent is used to provide fresh air into the home and is usually adjustable. Depending on the size of your home (and thus the size of your unit) the outside air vent can be from a 4” diameter metal vent to 8” diameter. Most have an adjustable blade that is set with a wingnut. You can adjust the ...


2

The most common issue when you have make up air on a hvac systems is when the kitchen exhaust or bathroom exhaust fans are turned on they usually push 80-1000 cuft and that air is sucked in vis the central heat or air ductwork. If an older home is is pulled in through all kinds of leaky air spaces. The most noticed time when the bathrooms and kitchen exhaust ...


2

Yes it is actually required for the combustion air. As for as the make up air or fresh air intake most newer homes do need them because the homes are sealed so tight that the build up of Co2 inside (from breathing) can reach unhealthy levels. As far as the location that is not as tightly regulated so the person installing the system puts them as close to the ...


2

You should investigate and upgrade the filtration of your air circulation rather than replacing your fuel burning furnace with an electric one. You need air exchange with the outside to get the oxygen you need to live. Though one upgrade I would investigate in is a dedicated intake for your furnace, that way it gets fresh outside air (which after burning ...


2

Since the question is "why" I'll try to answer that at the risk of many irate downvotes .. because one, or the other, or both, is not quite to spec! I guess that's obvious. This question reminds me of the vast difference in design and engineering between American and British plugs and sockets. Two ends of the spectrum. The British ones with ...


2

No, and the dead giveaway is the colors of wire on the former compressor. Red and black are colors used for low voltage wiring on vehicles. Black is the normal current return path. And because vehicle 12V/24V is not particularly dangerous, they just use the vehicle chassis as the current return path. There is no safety ground on vehicle wiring. The thing ...


2

Seems like the pump may be defective. It should have a valve to allow air into the ball, but not out of it. That does not appear to be working from your description. The "pump" looks very poorly made, at a glance. Even with appropriate adapters, pumping up small things like balls and bicycle tires at a filling station is risky - it's very easy to ...


2

Would have some ventilation in garage so humidly does not build up. No problems with venting A/C to garage except what humidly might do to stuff inside(drywall, storage of cloth) if not vented outside, open doors/windows.


2

I have removed the window by taking the upper arms out then lifting 1 side so the pins come out of the track. Set the window aside and use a piece of acrylic or poly carbonate. To block the hole and put the vent line(s) in the plastic. This is the only method I have found that customers were ok with and the window can be put back in in just a couple of ...


2

There are portable AC units that stand on the floor and vent through window. See photo below. You would have to be creative with the window you have, and block part of it with Styrofoam sheeting or clear plastic sheeting, drop cloth. Then install your vent duct and that would depend on the type included with your unit. If it gets hot enough, that will peak ...


1

The system you chose is called a heat pump. It is a specific kind of heat pump, called a mini-split heat pump. Air conditioners have a hot side and a cold side. The hot side is outdoors, and makes the already-hot outdoors even hotter. On a cool day wouldn't it be nice to switch them, and make the house warm and the outside cold(er)? Nothing need be moved, ...


1

It's never a good idea to close vents. You need the air circulating so keep them open. Get an inexpensive filter from your home store and cut a piece from it the size of your vent. Install it inside the vent register or tape it over the register and see if it cuts down on the dust.


1

Grainger will let you set up a business as a contractor. They sell almost anything you need from HVAC - to the point if they don't have it, you really shouldn't be repairing it. (Other than freon) I have also used https://www.repairclinic.com/ and a few sites like them. I have found on a few occasions grainger had a compatible part but using that part ...


1

There are split systems and mini split systems these are different creatures. A split system with an air handler/ plenum in your case is a small split. A mini split has all the controls in the head unit and are not designed to be in a plenum. If you have a small split you can divert some of the air flow to another zone but remember there also needs to be a ...


1

You'd use a 10" duct that comes off of a plenum/metal box which is 16x16 to match the hole. You will find it... tricky... to try and attach a duct directly to an irregular surface like a ceiling, floor, wall, etc. (in other words, don't do that). These are best answered by an HVAC technician running Manual S, T and D calculations after inspecting your ...


1

I question whether your HVAC is taking outside air for the input to the inside conditioned air. This is not the usual arrangement for a residence. Residences normally use entirely recirculated air. Automobile HVAC systems do allow the option of either outside air or recirculation, but home systems, usually do not. For one thing, a single pass through a home ...


1

Found this on the orange store site. It's a manual for a compressor (probably not yours): On the top front of the compressor you will find a white plastic shipping plug inserted into the Oil Filler Hole. Remove the shipping plug and replace it by pressing the red Oil Filler Plug (in parts bag) into the Oil Filler Hole. I hate to RTFM you, but sometimes it'...


1

Do they provide the FLA? Air compressor vendors lie about horse power!!! Going by code we would use the fla book value 5hp or 28 amps plus 125% because it is a motor load or 35 amps requiring a 35 but probably a 40 amp breaker and #8 wire. In reality your fla is probably going to be closer to 13 amps ( 2.98kw /240v) and that will be fine on a 12 awg circuit ...


1

There are two ways I could think of that you could be drawing in outside air: The return ducting runs through an unconditioned space, like an attic or crawl space, and has a leak, or The supply duct runs through an unconditioned space and has a leak. The AC system should be sucking return air, heating or cooling it, and then supplying that same volume (...


1

Creating compressed air is expensive If you consider most air handlers are pushing over 100 cubic feet of air a minute (many in the 200-300 rang). An air compressor 5 horse power will have a rating of 10-15 scfm at the working pressure so you would need a huge compressor just to move the air that would be expensive. Compared to the fractional HP motor on the ...


1

Radon emitted from soil can pass through concrete quite easily. Furthermore, concrete and other earth products themselves can emit radon as well. The fresh air vent coming from under an addition will not be any better with or without a concrete pad if the radon source is not properly mitigated. If you have a concern for radon exposure in your home the only ...


1

If you check right away you may be able to find the leak with bubble solution, loosing most of a charge in 1 week is a very big leak and should be easy to spot. I would not count on getting another fill of the R22 for 500$ that you got last time that was a really good price. If you can identify the leak it may be a simple fix so yes 150 may be worth it but ...


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