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9

Remove the 6 tabs (at 6am, 9am, etc.) and it should stop any automated on/off actions. It's hard to be sure from this vantage, but it appears that 3 of the tabs are light colored, and 3 are darker. The light ones are used to set "on" times, and the dark ones for "off" times.


8

Yes this is bad/dangerous because you now have current running on the ground wire at all times. This type of timer requires a seperate neutral (whereas most switches just interrupt the hot) so that the timer can be powered when the switch is in the off position. In your configuration, the line (power) comes in at the fixture and there is likely a 14/2 ...


7

Timers come in two varieties: Timers with a neutral wire. These are connected between the hot and neutral wires of the circuit, parallel to the load. They're powered like any other device, and work by switching the hot (and possibly neutral) wires of the controlled circuit. These timers can control any device, but require a location with access to both ...


6

IRC - 2006 Requires bath fans only if no operable window. Bathroom ventilation can operate intermittently at a minimum of 50 cfm or continuously at a minimum of 20 cfm, the same as 62 Bath fans must meet the design airflow either through on airflow either through on site testing or using their certified rated flow at 0.25” water column. Bath fans must be ...


4

Orision, My take on this is that you understand what you want pretty well, and understand electricity only at a very surface level. That's not a great mix. My suggestion would be for you to do some googling on home automation products and see if you can come up with a way to set up a system that accomplishes this with off the shelf home automation products ...


4

Just the hot. Just switch the hot.


4

Yes, that is precisely correct. Though I prefer red tape, but that's a preference, not a requirement to go buy a roll. Nicer (IMHO) because you can easily mark switched hots whether they be black or white.


4

Yes, apparently "tungsten-heater" load type is measured differently than a ideal/purely resistive load type! Check this for example - http://www.nkkswitches.com/pdf/electricalratings.pdf - you will see chart of the current v time "inrush" curve for tungsten filament electrical light bulbs - while cold, their resistance is very low - so they spike when ...


4

I would suggest a timer like this. Additional start/stop pins can be added if you decide on adding a second on off time (or more) and you can always flip the over ride to the On position. This way your water will be hot in the morning instead of having to wait after you turn it back on. The only problem is if there is a power outage you would need to ...


4

If the appliances have their own timers built in, then I don't think an additional in line timer adds significant safety or energy efficiency. And given that any device can malfunction, any additional device can introduce risk. If you already have a built-in timer, then most of the time I would keep it in the indefinite on position if the other appliances ...


4

You got the wrong switch. A spring wound timer switch, like the GE unit you're taking out, is you-powered. It doesn't need energy from another source to do what it does. Like any passive switch, it is simply a gate between "always-hot" and "switched-hot". However, your push button timer switch needs power to do its little thing. And it needs power at ...


4

I suggest that you don't have the right to interfere with communal wiring and lighting, one because it is not part of your property (leased, rented or owned) and two, because you may not have the qualifications or insurance coverage to do that work. However, If you want a light for your door controlled by a motion detector then there are LED lights with ...


3

Well...I typed that too fast, I guess. I just found the answer! Sure enough, this is not actually designed to handle fan loads. UGH. Just blew $40 on two of these. Apparently there's some small print. To quote a review on Home Depot's web site: Works great for lights,but as I'm finding a common problem with all electric supplies you must read the fine ...


3

A couple things could be going on, as @bib and @BMitch allude: Your transformer could be putting out AC 12V instead of DC 12V. (Sometimes these are labeled VAC and VDC, respectively.) Your transformer may not be able to supply enough current to power the pump. The pump and transformer should both have their current listed (in the case of the transformer it ...


3

This appears to be a Grässlin switch. Model FM1 DIGI14-120 Here is the manual (and another similar model)


3

This device may help. It is The Shower Manager


3

If you are looking for a schedule timer; not a countdown timer, it's not likely you'll find it with a separate switch on the same yoke. Even though electronics continue to get smaller and smaller, I don't think you'll find a combination 24 hour timer... Yet. It may be better to simply expand the single gang outlet into a double gang outlet. If there is ...


3

There are multiple options here: Bypass the switch Use Tester101's instructions :) Use the switch as an override-ON In this case, turning the switch on overrides the timer and turns the light ON until the switch is turned back off, giving control back to the timer. This can be accomplished by nutting all the blacks together and all the reds together in ...


3

A three-way switch is not necessary. You can connect a single-pole single-throw in parallel with the spring timer. EDIT: Future readers should note that this is electrician-safe only because both switches are in the same gang box. With the switches in separate boxes, someone working on this circuit in future might be surprised to find voltage on what he ...


3

how would I connect everything up at the light to allow the attic outlets to still have continuous power? Wire neutrals #1, #2, and #5 together; there will be no neutral connection to Romex #2. Connect "black" #1, #2, & #3 together, to deliver power to the outlet in the attic and to the wall switch; #3 will connect to the "line" terminal on the switch (...


3

Your timer needs requires four wires. Black is "hot" Red is the load wire, which is only hot when the switch is on (closed). White is neutral, which allows the timer itself to use power to operate. Bare/green is safety ground. The box you're working at, does not have a neutral. It's what's called a "switch loop", so only has a hot, switched hot, and ...


3

Easy peasy. Get a common, mains-rated 30-minute rundown timer - the kind of thing you see on bathroom fans or heat lamps. Except look for a special version of this which is either "Normally Closed", "NC" or "SPDT". You might have to hit up Galco or Grainger for this. If you get the kind that is mechanical, it wires up like a plain old light switch....


2

This switch combines a timer and a dimmer, each controlling a separate load, in a single gang box.


2

I can't quote chapter and verse, but in 10+ years, I've never had a building inspector ask for one. To me, that tells me it's not in the code. Personally, I like timers a lot. To be sure about your jurisdiction, call your local building department.


2

It looks like you pull the red tabs in or out to have the device turn on or off for a given 15 minute interval. I'm guessing the black arrow is pointing to the current time. The switch on the side is to manually turn it on or off (or perhaps permanently off or on the timer). You'll just need to test it to see if the tabs being in or out correspond to on vs ...


2

I wouldn't bother unless you're going to have your water turned off for a couple days. In that case, turn off the water heater itself. You'll have a hard time using any hot water with the main turned off, so it is mainly a consideration of whether or not it's worth it to keep the water in the tank hot over the period you won't be using it.


2

If the timer is in the fan, it may not be possible to disable the timer without disabling the fan itself. Based on the labels (L,T,N), I would guess that L is the switched input for the light and T is a switched input that starts the timer for the fan. You can test this by disconnecting the T terminal (make sure you cap the bare wire before turning the ...


2

Either 3 timers, one on each circuit, or one timer, controlling 3 relays, one relay on each circuit. The timer and relay control can be on a 4th circuit, or on one of the three circuits if there is capacity available. Whatever device does the switching needs to be adequate to handle switching the load - that is, the relay contacts must be rated to carry as ...


2

You'll have to purchase a timer that is specifically designed to work as a 3-way switch. Or you'll have to rewire the other 3-way switch in such a way that it will no longer control anything. Since I can't see the wiring at the second switch, I'm guessing the wiring currently looks something like this... Which is sketchy, since there's no grounded (...


2

It matters which one you replace, because that will determine which type of timer you need. One of those switches is going to be the "middle" switch, between the other two circuit-wise. That middle switch is a four-way switch, the two outside switches are three-way switches. You can determine which is which visually is you don't know the circuit layout - the ...


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