12

That is a strainer wye. There is a metal mesh filter in there to trap sediment/debris; it can be removed and cleaned as necessary.


9

I say BFP first. The backflow preventer must be installed before any point in the system where the line becomes "open" to the introduction of pollutants that would make the water unsafe for drinking (fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides, animal wastes, bacteria, and other things you generally find in your topsoil). While a pressure reducer's basic operation (...


7

Not clear what the reason for the question is. However, nominal water pressure for most residential homes is in the range of 40-70 psi (pounds per square inch). It can vary due to the distance from the home to the water source (such as a water tower), how much water is being used by surrounding homes (higher usage will lower the pressure), the capacity of ...


7

The best lubrication I've found is some good ol' Elbow Grease™. Actually, you should measure the proper lengths and just cut. Then glue it up and install. You can mark on the PVC how far it should go into the fitting if you want to be really precise. However PVC itself expands and contracts a lot with temperature change and is fairly flexible anyway. So, in ...


7

Clogged line There could be a clog in the lines feeding some of the sprinklers, or clogged up sprinkler heads. Remove all the sprinkler heads (the procedure will vary based on the type of heads). Inspect and clean the heads. Turn the system on. If you don't notice any dirt or gunk coming out, and the pressure does not increase in the low flowing outlets. ...


7

You'll be fine. Winterized involves removing all of the water from the system so the pipes don't explode from the freezing temperature. Empty pipes during the warm summer won't be a problem.


7

There are garden hose splice devices that you can purchase at home centers and big box stores that can be used to fix these. You may lose a short bit of total length as you cut off the damaged part to accomodate the splicer. If you need more added length you could use two of these splicers to stitch in a new length of hose. They also sell devices that ...


5

I'm no plumber, but I did just install my own sprinkler system. That looks like a reduced pressure assembly used for backflow prevention. the little screwdriver valves at bleeder. You should only need to touch them if Water comes out. With the main water under the house on, turn on the the big valve closest to the house first, then the second valve ...


5

This usually comes after years of use where there is grit in the water. The plastic sliding surfaces get abraded and start to stick. Usually the result is that you have to replace the sprinkler as the tube and piston are both pretty well shot. You might try unscrewing that black cap, the insides come out and with removing the spray head at the top, you can ...


5

First we need a Manufacturer and possibly if you can find it, a model number. Irrigation control valves like this have two parts, a diaphragm operated water control valve and a vacuum breaker. Typical Rainbird system shown here. The control valve uses an electrically controlled needle valve that operates the main diaphram valve through servo action (small ...


5

Use a pickaxe to dig a hole around the tree root, and use an axe or a saw to cut the root. Repeat as necessary. This works reasonably well for one tree, not so well for a forest.


4

Since you already have to dig it up to fix it, don't bother trying to repair the crack. Cut out and replace the damaged section of pipe. Use a coupling suitable for the type of pipe you are working with and that is rated for burial.


4

Some additional things to consider: 1) You could put a flow detector in the water line that feeds to the input side of the sprinkler valves. This way you could detect when one of the sprinkler valve has failed to work according to plan. I.E. if you detect flow when you expect the valve to be off that means there is a problem. 2) You could add timer / ...


4

I would think you would need the backflow valve first. I don't think it maters much for operating, but I think the water co. might want it that way. Are you regulating the water pressure to your whole house? Or just the irrigation system? I ask because if you are doing the house, then you need to adjust the air pressure in your expansion tank on the water ...


4

For yard sprinklers (irrigation) this is usually figured the other way around. Find out what your water supply is capable of, then build a system which will work well within that. If you have an existing system and you're trying to find an estimate without measuring... every system is different. There's not a standard pressure. To find our what your ...


4

I was in total agreement with Ecnerwal, that those bumps were to hold it in wall board. Finding this picture tells a different story: (notice the bumps and the threaded insert) My best guess is that up in the ceiling somewhere, is the rest of the part; those bumps thread into it, or you can just push (see, 4.a). Be gentle with it, those are 50 bucks. ...


4

Evaporative cooling is less effective in places with high humidity. There are mathematic formulas for how much water will be needed to cool a specified surface area by some number of degrees and they are not simple. The wiki article on this has some good information. It would be good to get some idea how much water will be needed before heading down that ...


3

A picture would make it easier to help, but I would guess the white "nut" you see is probably the PVC female adapter that is glued to the pipe. If you can do it, the fastest fix is to unthread the nipple from inside the hub, then just replace it with a new nipple. If you can't do that, you'll have to cut the adapter off, and then glue a new one on (PVC ...


3

Your pressure is probably too low to shut the backflow, so all of the air is coming out the PVB. You've got to get sufficient pressure to seal the PVB. Mine takes 50 - 60 psi using a compressor that delivers 6-7 CFM in that PSI range. Also consider the professionals use compressors delivering much higher CFM...their compressor may be quite capable of ...


3

It's a fairly standard quarter turn ball valve, for permanent repair, take the union loose, remove the valve and replace with like. No patch you can apply will properly seal against expansion propagating through the patch material or breaking the patch material off eventually. Any moisture underneath the patch allowed to freeze will spall it off of the ...


3

It can, if you live in a hot sunny climate and there is no one-way valve to the sprinkler system. Cold water in, or on their way to the sprinkler valves will be heated by the ground or sun, and expand will a little causing significant back pressure. If you have ever left your garden hose filled with water with the hose bib shut off on a sunny day, then ...


3

The correct answer depends on a number of variables related to the size of the space and your future landscaping plans. If time permits, you should sketch out a landscaping plan and consult with an irrigation planner to ascertain in-ground requirements according to planned design and water supply. If time does not permit, follow advice of @Platinum Goose ...


3

Yes, you need to winterize them. That looks like a backflow-prevention device, which prevents water from the lawn from flowing back into the city pipes (in the event of a loss of pressure). Typically, when I lived in TX, my winterization procedure was to shut the inlet valve (the green-handled valve on the right side of the device in your picture) and turn ...


3

Simplest 100% legal way would be to make it use rain water directly from storage containers, and then a float valve that fills the rain barrel with city water if the water level gets below a certain level. This would also allow you to maintain an airgap between potable and non-potable water sources. You're losing the free water pressure from the city water, ...


3

People put flexible pipes inside concrete all the time (this is how heated floors are made) you should space it away from the floor and trench mesh so that it does not become a conduit for moisture (from the soil) and oxygen to attack the reinforcing steel If you have more of that line and some elbows now would be a good time to move it. But if you're ...


3

Yes, because a poor connection due to subsequent corrosion can affect the signal which may well cause unreliable operation. There are waterproof junction boxes available which you should use.


2

If you are asking about landscape irrigation, two important pieces of data are water pressure and flow rate. Although many parts of a system can operate over a wide range of water pressures, the nozzles are designed for and perform best around 30 or 40 PSI. The problem with low pressure is obvious but excessive high pressure can cause misting and otherwise ...


2

I'm not sure who the idiot was who put this down that hole, but it was pretty firmly lodged in there. I cut off a bit more of the PVC and was able to get my trusty pry bar in the notch and turn it. After about three quarters of a turn the stupid thing came out. And sure enough, there was a regular stop and waste down there underneath whatever the heck this ...


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