12

That is a strainer wye. There is a metal mesh filter in there to trap sediment/debris; it can be removed and cleaned as necessary.


7

The best lubrication I've found is some good ol' Elbow Grease™. Actually, you should measure the proper lengths and just cut. Then glue it up and install. You can mark on the PVC how far it should go into the fitting if you want to be really precise. However PVC itself expands and contracts a lot with temperature change and is fairly flexible anyway. So, in ...


7

You'll be fine. Winterized involves removing all of the water from the system so the pipes don't explode from the freezing temperature. Empty pipes during the warm summer won't be a problem.


7

There are garden hose splice devices that you can purchase at home centers and big box stores that can be used to fix these. You may lose a short bit of total length as you cut off the damaged part to accomodate the splicer. If you need more added length you could use two of these splicers to stitch in a new length of hose. They also sell devices that ...


7

I have something like this and it works just fine. (I have only one soaker hose in each bed, and both soakers are the same size.) The flow rate involved is very slow, so the hose and connector sizes cause no interference. The pressure will be the same throughout.


6

Both times I have encountered hose faucets with devices seemingly fused onto the hose threads were when somebody (not me) assembled them without a hose washer. Whether or not this is the case in your situation, you will definitely need to back up your attempts to disconnect the fitting with a substantial wrench on the faucet itself, to prevent twisting the ...


5

This usually comes after years of use where there is grit in the water. The plastic sliding surfaces get abraded and start to stick. Usually the result is that you have to replace the sprinkler as the tube and piston are both pretty well shot. You might try unscrewing that black cap, the insides come out and with removing the spray head at the top, you can ...


5

First we need a Manufacturer and possibly if you can find it, a model number. Irrigation control valves like this have two parts, a diaphragm operated water control valve and a vacuum breaker. Typical Rainbird system shown here. The control valve uses an electrically controlled needle valve that operates the main diaphram valve through servo action (small ...


5

Use a pickaxe to dig a hole around the tree root, and use an axe or a saw to cut the root. Repeat as necessary. This works reasonably well for one tree, not so well for a forest.


4

Some additional things to consider: 1) You could put a flow detector in the water line that feeds to the input side of the sprinkler valves. This way you could detect when one of the sprinkler valve has failed to work according to plan. I.E. if you detect flow when you expect the valve to be off that means there is a problem. 2) You could add timer / ...


4

Since you already have to dig it up to fix it, don't bother trying to repair the crack. Cut out and replace the damaged section of pipe. Use a coupling suitable for the type of pipe you are working with and that is rated for burial.


4

I was in total agreement with Ecnerwal, that those bumps were to hold it in wall board. Finding this picture tells a different story: (notice the bumps and the threaded insert) My best guess is that up in the ceiling somewhere, is the rest of the part; those bumps thread into it, or you can just push (see, 4.a). Be gentle with it, those are 50 bucks. ...


4

Evaporative cooling is less effective in places with high humidity. There are mathematic formulas for how much water will be needed to cool a specified surface area by some number of degrees and they are not simple. The wiki article on this has some good information. It would be good to get some idea how much water will be needed before heading down that ...


4

People put flexible pipes inside concrete all the time (this is how heated floors are made) you should space it away from the floor and trench mesh so that it does not become a conduit for moisture (from the soil) and oxygen to attack the reinforcing steel If you have more of that line and some elbows now would be a good time to move it. But if you're ...


4

Definitely rotortill before you put in the pipes. Otherwise you run the risk of damaging pipes and sprinklers.


4

You haven't specified how long of a run each section is so if you need very fine control of water flow then install a Y-splitter with ball valves at the spigot and run a dedicated hose to each garden bed. This will eliminate the problem of uncontrollable over/under watering. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Melnor-4-Way-Hose-Faucet-Connection-9009/202881087


3

It's a fairly standard quarter turn ball valve, for permanent repair, take the union loose, remove the valve and replace with like. No patch you can apply will properly seal against expansion propagating through the patch material or breaking the patch material off eventually. Any moisture underneath the patch allowed to freeze will spall it off of the ...


3

It can, if you live in a hot sunny climate and there is no one-way valve to the sprinkler system. Cold water in, or on their way to the sprinkler valves will be heated by the ground or sun, and expand will a little causing significant back pressure. If you have ever left your garden hose filled with water with the hose bib shut off on a sunny day, then ...


3

The correct answer depends on a number of variables related to the size of the space and your future landscaping plans. If time permits, you should sketch out a landscaping plan and consult with an irrigation planner to ascertain in-ground requirements according to planned design and water supply. If time does not permit, follow advice of @Platinum Goose ...


3

Yes, you need to winterize them. That looks like a backflow-prevention device, which prevents water from the lawn from flowing back into the city pipes (in the event of a loss of pressure). Typically, when I lived in TX, my winterization procedure was to shut the inlet valve (the green-handled valve on the right side of the device in your picture) and turn ...


3

Simplest 100% legal way would be to make it use rain water directly from storage containers, and then a float valve that fills the rain barrel with city water if the water level gets below a certain level. This would also allow you to maintain an airgap between potable and non-potable water sources. You're losing the free water pressure from the city water, ...


3

Yes, because a poor connection due to subsequent corrosion can affect the signal which may well cause unreliable operation. There are waterproof junction boxes available which you should use.


3

The clicking is the relay being pulled in. This is a common failure in relays after thousands of cycles the contacts burn and do not make good contacts, I have special burnishing tools to clean the contacts and this can also be done with a fine sandpaper (400+ grit), but cutting away contact material is a short term fix in some cases. A new relay is going to ...


3

When I install a sprinkler system, I Rototill first, then trench and install the piping, etc. then backfill trenches, compact the trenches, then flatten/roll the yard in prep for hydro-seeding or sod. You'll want to be sure to compact the backfill in the trenches or the dirt will settle over time and you'll be able to see/feel the depressions where the ...


3

soaker hoses suffer from pressure drop, and running a long garden hose between two sections is going to make that worse. You might consider running a 3/8 plastic pipe/non-drip feeder to the left side of bed 1, then run a Y connector, and connect the soaker hose for bed 1 and the garden hose/soaker hose for bed 2. This would eliminate the un-evenness you'll ...


3

That's an anti-siphon (or vacuum breaker) valve: Source It prevents dirty yard water from being sucked back into the potable water system if the water pressure fails.


3

I agree it seems redundant to use anti-siphon valves in combination with a backflow prevention device. But people don't always choose these valves because they needed the anti-siphon feature. Maybe the person who chose them just doesn't like operating or maintaining valves that are underground (harder to bend and reach) in a box full of spider webs. They ...


3

Destroy the sprinkler controller and hit it with a propane torch and real penetrating oil not "water displacement formula 40". Use PB Blaster or equivalent. Be careful not to overheat it you don't want to unsweat it from the faucet. The faucet rubber washer may not survive this.


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