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36

You can find a manual siphon pump at any large hardware or automotive store. It will look like a hand-sized rubber bulb, or possibly like a small hand-operated bike pump, with a hose on each end. An arrow or other marker will be present on the bulb to show you which side is the intake and which side is the outlet. You simply submerge the end of the intake ...


28

A method that will work in your case is to coil up the entire hose in the water to be removed or ensure that the hose is completely filled by filling one end from the faucet until the other ceases to eject air bubbles. Once filled, hold your finger/thumb over the hose end and drop it out the window(?) which will start the autosiphon action. If you have an ...


27

Looks like the typical gap one gets when mounting a tubeless tire. You'll need to get the bead to seat against the rim as you pump air (hopefully quickly) into the tire - a hand pump might not do it. Sometimes you can jiggle the tire to effect a temporary seal around the bead as your compressor dumps air in. Using a clip-on tire chuck will help. Some ...


25

Clamp Power Meter Buy or borrow a clamp power-meter with a "kWh" feature, that is, the ability to perform an energy measurement. Not all clamp meters have this, e.g. a "True RMS" meter performs an accurate power measurement for non-sinusoidal signals but still not an energy measurement. Open the AC unit or the electrical panel (careful, ...


19

If you're not afraid of a little fire then this could work: https://youtu.be/DJiqbAVsxRY Put on some safety glasses, preferably tinted Put on some rubber gloves Put on some ear protection Have a water hose ready Spray some highly flammable aerosol into the rim of the tire such as carb & choke cleaner or WD-40 per the video Place aerosol can at least ...


15

Wanted to add a clarification to the auto-siphon technique - you do not need to fill up the entire hose. You only need to fill up enough to make it without air gaps to a level below your siphon source, e.g. the medium-blue in my poor drawing below. If you have a 20 foot hose this means you can just coil up the first 4-5 feet in the dirty water so it is ...


15

See other answer for how to test for actual efficiency gain, but you're basically cooling your output coil with a swamp cooler. In commercial settings it's called a free cooler. Water is either misted or dripped over a porous substance that the cooling air passes through. It cools the air as it evaporates, but greatly increases humidity. The concern I ...


14

Disclaimer: This question is about Air Conditioners. The "You" discussed below is an air conditioner owner. This answer is not about heat pumps, which are a different class of equipment (operating on the same scientific principle, but there the similarity ends). Well, an aircon owner would likely ruin their condenser coils* by letting water ...


11

Take it to the local tire store, and ask them to inflate it - they'll use their bead-blaster machine to mount it. Should be little to no cost. The next time it happens, ask the tire store to put an innertube in the tire. That solves the problem forever. (Only do it the 'next time', because it may never happen again..)


10

If you want to avoid having to restart the siphon periodically, a useful trick may be to shape the hose into a sort of "S" shape, with the inside end extending to near the bottom of the tub, and the outside end going down but then rising to an altitude which is above the altitude of the inside end. The siphon, once established, will remain unbroken as long ...


9

If you gather and archive a local source of weather data, and operate the mist system on alternate days for a while, you should be able to gather a pretty good sense of the effect on power use, despite variations in internal and external temperatures & dewpoints. Over time, your data set will have "directly comparable days" as well as "...


7

does the spin on that impeller (at a high velocity) really create enough momentum to move water up seven or eight stories? It doesn't have to create momentum as it isn't throwing water ballistically. It just has to create a small difference in pressure. Note that you ask about circulating water, not pumping it up into a tank. The pump does not have to ...


7

I think you have a couple of factors to consider in using a condensate pump. One is the volume of water per unit time relative to what the pump can handle. A condensate pump is going to expect a trickle flow from the air conditioning system. When used as a washing machine pump, the float will rise as the reservoir fills and activate the pump. Will the ...


6

Sewer pumps are designed for specific uses and their ability to handle different liquids and solids varies hugely. Read the documentation for your specific one. The most common enemies: For all drains, not just pumped ones: Fats that harden when slightly cooled. EG, chicken fat, olive oil. If it's solid in the fridge but liquid when you pour it down the ...


5

Sometimes the hose barb fittings on a pump or device are removable so you can swap them for another fitting that suits your use. Here, it looks like the hose barbs are molded into the plastic of the pump housing. For this you can use a short length of vinyl or silicone tubing and a hose barb-PVC fitting of the proper size (shown here). You'd have a few ...


4

After pulling the motor out (which required draining the spa and disconnecting the PVC connections) and removing the cover, I found another capacitor. Googling the part number indicates that this is a start capacitor. It helps the motor start. The motor also has a capacitor on the outside, and it's the run capacitor. That's the one that was replaced ...


4

We ended up bleeding the radiators, upping the pressure, and replacing the thermocouple. After all of that, we discovered that flames had been shooting out of the front of the boiler and melted half of the valve, messing up the electronics for the pilot light. We ended up replacing the entire boiler since it was 35 years old anyway, but the reason for the ...


4

There are two solutions: Wet/dry "Pump" Vac Look for a wet/dry vac that is labeled "pump" (the manufacturer will likely draw a nice hose with fresh water prominently on the box). Such wet/dry vacs have a built-in water pump. One model on the market looks like this: Universal Pump for Wet/Dry Vacuums These are add-ons to your wet/dry vacs. Your vac must ...


4

In short, no. Each leg of a 240v circuit is is 180° out of phase and they share a common neutral. If both legs are hot, it will trip a 1 pole GFCI because the opposite phases cancel each other out on the neutral. You would need a 2 pole GFCI, which trips when there is a potential difference between the 2 hot legs instead of a single hot and neutral.


4

It has been a few years since I looked at specs on one but the two numbers are identified as Q/H or (m3/h by m). (m = meters) To my understanding Q is volume of flow in m³/h (25), so how many cubic meters of liquid can flow in a hour period. With H is delivery head in m (height) which is the height you can pump a liquid to straight up. These are the basic ...


4

You cannot use a water pump to pump air. A water pump is designed to move fluid with a viscosity and density that is 1000 times greater than air. The water pump needs the lubrication and cooling of the water passing through it to keep it from overheating. Running a water pump dry will ruin it in short order. Also it will not effectively pump air.


4

I've had decent luck using a couple of plastic bags and even saran wrap. I rolled them up and placed them near the rim so that it fills in the gap enough to get a better seal. The pump then works well enough to expand the tire. The gap shown in the photo is small enough for this trick to work. Long term solution is to have it filled with foam.


4

Siphoning will work, and how hard it is has little to do with how long the hose is going DOWN, its the distance from the top of the liquid to the highest point of the hose. (before someone very exact corrects me, yes, the longer the hose, the more the suction you create can cause the hose to dilate, reducing the effectiveness of your sucking action, but let'...


4

Install a sink above the 3' height The root of your problem is that your wash water is on the floor. Most people with sinks have the sink at some height above the floor. And I have a feeling you, too, work with the water at some height rather than stooping, and then place it on the floor. Well, don't. Treat the altitude of the water as a precious ...


4

Current flows in loops. Between hot and hot; or between hot and neutral. But always a loop. Wayward current wants to get back to SOURCE - not earth. For human-generated artificial electricity, wayward hot current wants to get back to NEUTRAL (or an opposing hot) not ground. It has no interest in ground, except that there’s a neutral-ground bond back at ...


4

You need a pump that will provide more pressure. That may or may not be "larger" in terms of HP - my recollection was that the most common 1/2 HP submersible pumps when I was shopping were actually set up for higher pressure/deeper wells than the 3/4 HP pump I got, but the key is that the HP alone does NOT tell you what the pump can or will do - ...


4

Wells are all so different. In my area, we have few aquifers, rather it's mostly underground rivers. So, as usual, "it depends" (sorry!) Water deep down can be under a lot of pressure so when the driller finally hits water, it can rise a lot in the well casing. At my parent's farm there is a 150' well in which the water rises over the top of the ...


4

Could be an overload This is a 240V (2-pole) breaker. Given the 20A size, it is perfectly legal for it to feed both 120V and 240V loads, and I suspect the pool pump is a 240V load. A 20A 240V/2-pole breaker has two poles (legs) of 20A each. A 120V load can draw off one leg and neutral, and it will draw the amps it says. A 240V load will draw off both legs at ...


4

should this come out ahead since the water is "free" as condensate? Probably. Your logic is sound.. As others have mentioned, heat pumps are already quite efficient, and the most you can gain from this system is going to be dependent on how much condensate the evaporator produces as well as the outdoor humidity. Unfortunately both of these are ...


3

I doubt that it's #10, but even #12 can seem like a pretty thick wire when you're, even casually, used to #14. I'm surprised your pump receptacle doesn't have clamps instead of screws. Is it a 20 amp, twist lock, single receptacle? Without using force make sure the device screws are completely backed out, but don't remove them. Strip off about 1” of ...


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