23

In addition to what FreeMan stated, if you have an electric water heater you want to turn off the breaker that feeds it. Depending on your plumbing, turning on some hot water faucets to finish some dishes or finish washing up could drain the water heater. If the thermostat for it kicks in and the water level is low, you'll burn up the element in seconds. ...


14

I've turned the water off at the meter for our house more than once - I even bought my own "curb key" to do it. We've had a small variety of leaks and issues requiring this. The water company has turned it off for a variety of maintenance work too. I've never taken any particular precautions prior to turning the water off, nor had any ill effects ...


4

You are lucky to live in a place where the utility company doesn't turn off your water on a schedule because there is a water shortage. Those of us who are used to it know that nothing particularily bad happens. If you plan to work on hot water part, turn off your water heater no matter if it is powered by electricity, gas, coal or uranium rods (sun-powered ...


4

It is unusual for both elements to be on at the same time in a residential water heater. The upper thermostat starts heating the water and when it gets to the set temperature it switches power to the lower thermostat. The upper thermostat has a single pole double throw switch to the lower one so both elements can't be on at the same time. If it's happening, ...


3

Not gonna work. You’re on electric, and you can’t just spam on more water heaters. You need to have the electric service to power them. So let’s look at your options (other than, a smaller tub). Make sure your heater is healthy; e.g. siphon pipe is intact. A lot of water heaters get their water supply shortened when a siphon pipe rusts out. Have that ...


3

Yes you can do that but it will be highly inefficient. A single larger tank is more efficient than two smaller ones with the same total capacity. This is because they have more surface area between them for heat to be lost from. So install a 50 gal. tank. You might consider an on-demand/tankless heater for your tub needs. That way you will have all the ...


3

Yes, you should turn off power to the water heater, and make sure that all air is out of it before turning it back on. Depending on its location in your house relative to various outlets, air getting into the tank may be unlikely, or very likely. But if sufficient air gets in the tank (typically from opening faucets to get a little bit of water that will ...


2

It turned out the heater was leaking in general. After some more trial and error the leak started when the pressure relief valve was closed but the cold water supply line nut was losened slightly (so that air could get into the tank). And after the pressure was reduced more the leak just kept going no matter what. So for some strange reason the tank ...


2

Is your water heater inside the home or outside? I ask this because heat pumps use heat transfer using the heat of the area they are in to create heat. Ok to put it more simply if the water heater is inside the home when the water heater is extracting heat to store in the tank it is cooling that area just like an air conditioner would. So are heat pumps more ...


1

If you gas to heat the hot water is only $20 a month, It would not make economical sense to change to a heat pump. The cost of a gas water heater would be roughly 1/3 or less the cost of a hybrid heat pump. The gas has low maintenance, just yearly flushing and maybe anode replacement. Gas has a fast recovery time. The hybrid heat pump would require 220 v ...


1

The #1 factor in water heater life isn’t raw age (and 15 isn’t exactly geriatric), it’s maintenance of anode rods. Heat pump water heaters aren’t free. They just change the piper you are paying. As Ed Beal says, heat pump water heaters are basically air conditioners that have the “hot side” in a big tank of water. That’s awesome when you want to run air ...


1

If you're willing to throw some money at this problem... As it turns out, there is a heat pump water heater that can come close to fitting in the existing space available for a tank, while putting out the necessary quantities of hot water; however, it costs a few times as much as a typical heat pump water heater does. If that's not a deal-killer, though, ...


1

If your municipal water supply does not require a check valve (backflow preventer) where the water enters your house, then you probably do not have an expansion tank in your water system. In that case, if your water heater is not up to full temperature when you close your main valve and the water heater is running, the water in the tank will expand as it ...


1

I plumbed my entire 3 flat myself and put a return line to the bottom of each tank. Sweated copper. Completely well worth it. Anyone that tells you differently is foolish. With pex tubing & connections, the job is significantly easier and cheap.


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