12

You should remove and replace the valve. If you cannot open it using the lever chances are good that it also will not function properly when needed. So you have a dangerous condition. It looks like you have limited space to work in so you may need to remove the downpipe from the valve before you can remove it. But a new one is cheap insurance vs. a ...


8

A cable with two insulated 4 AWG wires and an uninsulated grounding wire in a common sheath (which is what makes them a cable.) You might need a real electrical supplier, rather than Homely's Despot to find that. It's a bit out of their usual range of product.


7

This is better done with conduit As it turns out, 4/2 NM-B cable isn't even made; you could use a 4/3 NM-B cable, but that's upwards of $4/ft. You are much better off wiring this using a 1" ENT ("smurf tube") with a couple of 4AWG THHNs for the hots and an 8AWG THHN ground. Even in copper, this costs less than $3/ft; if you went with 2AWG ...


3

You can breaker down but not up, so yes, you can just replace the 60 with a 50, the wires should fit. Before you do that though, check with the installation instructions to verify what your plumber wants you to do. The instructions will specify what size breaker you need to have and changing those directions can void any warranties you might have.


3

I'll answer this with the example of my own experience just this year. I had a similar situation with my 14 year old water heater. I used a pair of pliers to open the valve, which didn't really take much. What I didn't realize is that it didn't seat again. I had water dribbling out constantly, but I mistook it for the AC since it was in the same location as ...


3

Your core concern is the amount of time it takes between opening the hot faucet and getting water that is actually hot. This plan will do nothing for that. The delay is caused by the volume of water (inventory) that is in the pipe in between the water heater and the faucet. That pipe is exposed to ambient? Outside? air, and has cooled off. That water must ...


2

The question is Does this make sense to do? My answer to that is, Based on how you worded your scenario, This does not make sense to me. I can not wrap my head around how it would be in parallel. What you have described is two units in series. (one after the other) A tankless water heater is an on demand unit. It only fires up and heats water when a hot ...


2

Ancient thread, but since I couldn't find this info anywhere else, I'm going to post to this. Since it's only the hot water that isn't flowing, the problem isn't the aerator, it's almost certainly the cartridge (the device connected to the faucet handle that mixes the hot and cold water). That has very small openings that clog/jam easily. You may want to ...


2

If its corroded and enlarged all the way to the bottom you may have to cut it loose. In the tank it will continue being dissolved by the minerals until there's nothing left. And while that's happening the new rod will be in place. You can try wrenching it out and probably break off chunk's of anode. This also shouldn't be an issue unless you plan on flushing ...


2

Water Heaters that you can purchase today usually have a warranty from the manufacturer. I think the average warranty is about 6-8 years. You can find ones for 8-12 years, but you will pay much more. You can estimate fairly accurately the life-span of a water heater by looking at the warranty. This is not always true, but it's a good way to get reasonable ...


2

There are tankless heaters designed to operate in conjunction with a storage tank, but the old tank heater would not work for this use. And a basic standard tankless water heater does not have the controls to work in conjunction with a storage tank. There are published designs for using an electric tank water heater as a storage tank in conjunction with a ...


2

Flush it using the drain valve. Hard water deposits will settle out on the bottom, and impair the transfer of heat from the flame to the water. If you are depending on the water heater thermostat to prevent scalding your children, you're not abnormal, but you're doing it wrong. Use a tempering valve between the water heater and your hot water system. That ...


1

Solution was to get a different unit.


1

Is the lowered temp only at one fixture or throughout the house? If there is indeed a temperature drop in the water from the water heater throughout the house, I would suspect a failed element (assuming the water heater is electric) or a bad thermostat. Get the service manual for your make and model and test the element(s ) and the thermistat(s), if electric....


1

Like someone else said, run a hot water tap for a while and measure the temp. That's what your WH is supplying. If at about 120 or so, the WH is doing its job. If your shower has an automatic mixing valve, the cartridge may need to be replaced. We had the opposite problem....the mixing valve wouldn't mix enough cold water even on the coldest setting to ...


1

Your expectation is correct, once the warm water is flushed you should then have hot. There are 2 types of recirculating systems one one uses the cold line and has the pump and check valve (I believe this is the type you have) in a recirculating system on the cold line if the check valve fails it ends up being a mixing system. A 3 line system has a separate ...


1

With the water turned off to standing pilot gas water heaters, I suggest leaving the controller in pilot; that way it can not turn on the burner and damage the tank. This also keeps the pilot running and those pesky little spiders that love to build nests in the tubing away; then, when you return, just turn it to the proper temp: no hassle having to relight ...


1

Unlikely an "under-performing element", they usually either work or don't work. 2 things come to mind: 1) The flow rate thru the electric boiler is just too great to get the water up to temp, or 2) You have a control problem. Did you check to see that all the elements get power? Is there any staging involved? Your thought that it might have ...


1

My guess is that the chimney for the two water heaters was sized to provide draft for two pilot lights, not one. The air isn't getting hot enough to push (or pull, depending on your point of view) the warm and low oxygen air out the top of the chimney. Instead of warm CO2 floating up and away it sits under the water heater until there is no longer enough ...


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