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So I have a joist that stops short of a stairwell and doesn’t connect to the foundation and I’m going to move the supporting beam back 2 feet (it’s about an 8 ft run between the header and other supporting beams). I’ve talked to a number of guys and they said the moving that 2 feet back won’t be dangerous.

So I’m installing an adjustable steel column to the 2x8 wooden joist and the fastening the post to the concrete. 1) can I use Tapcon Masonry Screws or do I need Tapcon Concrete screws? 2) what would be a sufficient length and diameter of screw 3) Because this post is adjustable and I’m not pouring concrete over the top of it, do I need to do anything to “lock” it into place for code.

Here is a link to the column I’m purchasing: https://www.menards.com/main/p-1444423416220-c-5725.htm?tid=3647805878147678020

Or would I be better off using a treated 4x4? If that's the case, how can I fasten the 4x4 to the 2x8 joist?

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    Your framing scenario isn't clear to me. What does "doesn't connect to the foundation" mean? What "header"? A sketch or photo would be invaluable. – isherwood Dec 11 '15 at 21:32
  • The house is 24' wide, there are joists that span from the foundation to the middle of the house which reside on a header. Where my steps go down stairs, one of the joists does not go to the foundation and therefore requires a post to hold that section of the house up. The railing going downstairs is attached to that post. Next time I'll be sure to post a picture – tjcinnamon Dec 12 '15 at 20:53
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The strongest possible thing to do would be dig down about 36 inches dump concrete in and put a footing in and a column before you put that beam in that'll suffice as a footing for the foundation to hold the floor. If you just throw a beam in you are supporting the entire floor with a beans sitting on 2 to 3 inches of concrete that's not quite strong enough

  • I'm replacing an existing post that has the same configuration. I'm more concerned with fastening the post to the ground and the joist such that it can't be moved. It's one joist under a non load bearing wall with an 8ft run. Whatever solution I use (4x4 or steel column) should support the weight. – tjcinnamon Nov 11 '15 at 19:41
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    If it is in a basement you don't need to dig that deep (there is no worry of frost heave) but a footing is a good idea. 8" thick for a footing is plenty and 16 to 24" square. – ArchonOSX Dec 11 '15 at 21:39
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I used 4 - ⅜" steel anchors for the bottoms of the posts in my new house. Then used 4 - ¼" lag bolts on the tops with suitable washers.

Once you put weight on the post it shouldn't move but I am an overbuilder and wanted to make sure the tops and bottoms of the posts didn't go anywhere.

I had a 24"x24"x8" footing poured for each post also. A footing is not a bad idea to help distribute the point load.

Happy Friday!

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1) can I use Tapcon Masonry Screws or do I need Tapcon Concrete screws? I used concrete, for they appeared to work

2) what would be a sufficient length and diameter of screw I used 3', 5/8 diameter (it's what the post required)

3) Because this post is adjustable and I’m not pouring concrete over the top of it, do I need to do anything to “lock” it into place for code. as far as code specifically I'm uncertain but it's anchored at the bottom and screwed to the joist at the top.

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