1

A bit new here and I hope I'm not asking this question again but I couldn't find anything like this.

I'll give some context:

I'm looking to set up new tables in my room in an L orientation with one of the table tops being between 5 to 10cm higher than the other (a somewhat contemporary look). Basically, the way I want to support these tables is that one end of each of the tables (the short end opposite from the corner) will have a cabinet and the other (on the corner end) will be mounted by L brackets.

I'm really looking to have the brackets as low profile as possible so that the table tops have that floating look on one end. There will be no support from the bottom table to the top one.

Has anybody done this type of thing before or are familiar with wall mounting table tops? If so, do you think L brackets will be sufficient? I'm planning to have 4 L brackets on each table top at the corner end. Two on each side at the ends of the table to provide as much support as possible and to minimize the possibility of the L bracket's bending.

Heres something of what I had in mind for how the supports would be:

http://www.houzz.com/photos/556452/Guest-Studio-modern-home-office-new-york

This one is similar except the support of my tables will be a cabinet instead of that panel and the end on the wall will have to be screwed in by some sort of low profile bracket.

  • The table in your pic is at first sight, somewhat frightening. Sooner or later, some drunk, or running kid, is going to bash into the extended end of the table at a high velocity. Whatever hinging system they've used had better be designed to handle the resultant torque, or you will have a mess on your hands. – Wayfaring Stranger Oct 11 '15 at 13:16
1

If I understand what you're describing, I'd suggest using angle iron rather than L-brackets. The attachment of the angle iron to the wall has to be strong, you'd want to hit at least two studs, use strong fasteners, washers, etc. The attachment of the angle iron to the tabletop would depend on what material the tabletop is made of, but you'd want to use enough screws to make it secure.

  • Fortunately, there are two studs that I can screw an angle iron on so hopefully that is good. In terms of the table top material, I'm planning to get a solid timber becnh top from my local hardware store or a solid bench top from Ikea. In terms of what type of timber, I'm looking for bamboo or some other itmber that has a light finish – John Horbino Oct 11 '15 at 10:46
  • With real wood rather than fiberboard / MDF, a few screws should hold it to the angle iron just fine. – batsplatsterson Oct 11 '15 at 12:49

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.