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I have a Fleetwood Archetype door lock for sliding doors that I want to improve by adding an external locking mechanism. It looks as following:

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The lock is described in more detail in its patent application (US 8186189B2). I need some sort of a cylinder attachment that would let me rotate the T-shaped slot - is there a generic product on the market that would let me do that?

I've tried emailing the manufacturer about this, but didn't get a response yet so I was hoping to solve the problem on my own.

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  • Related: diy.stackexchange.com/questions/206679/… Nov 30 '20 at 6:11
  • Do you know if the door opening will fit a standard KIK or mortise cylinder? Can you provide more details on how the lock cylinder mounts into the door? Nov 30 '20 at 23:30
  • @ThreePhaseEel yes the diameter of the circle perfectly fits a standard cylinder. You can see nice structural diagrams in the patent that's linked at the end of the post. It is mounted inside a sliding glass door. Nov 30 '20 at 23:34
  • Yeah -- Fig 2 in the patent depicts a standard mortise cylinder in use Nov 30 '20 at 23:37
  • @ThreePhaseEel yes, a standard mortise cylinder does fit the opening at the top, but it needs some sort of an attachment to rotate the T-shaped opening and open/close the lock Dec 1 '20 at 0:06
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You can use a standard mortise cylinder, but it needs the correct tailpiece fitted

Based on the patent you linked (good find!), your lockset does work with a standard mortise cylinder (item 30 in Figure 2). However, different mortise cylinders accept different styles of tailpieces to interface with different locksets. While you appear to have the roller (item 36 in Figure 2) that mates with the T-slot (item 63 in Figure 3) in your lockset, the tailpiece (called "cam" by the patent, item 32 in Figure 2) that interfaces with that roller is missing. Fleetwood may be able to sell you a spare tailpiece if you ask nicely (using the term "tailpiece" for what you're after should help, as tailpieces are commonly needed spare parts in the locksmithing world); if not, you'll have to have one fabricated (it doesn't look like a terribly hard machine-shop job to me, at least, though). Once you have the correct part, you can simply attach it to the back of the mortise cylinder's core, provided you have a mortise cylinder that accepts two-screw tailpieces (some use a different style).

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I wasn't able to figure out the right tailpiece, so I contacted Fleetwood (the lock manufacturer) and obtained a spare part. I'm still not sure what kind of a tailpiece this is, but adding some photos for future reference.

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