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When installing an old work low voltage ring/bracket in a room (for a network plug), I cut the hole where there is a block behind the drywall.

The block is what looks to be a 1x4, going vertically up and down at las far as my hand can reach. I cut the hole right in the middle of the 1x4.

So now the swing clamps in the bracket won't latch properly as they wont go far enough to go behind the block.

I sawed the 1x4 at the top and bottom of the hole in a so the clamps got a little grip, but that's not gonna hold if somebody pull a cable from the plug.

Any idea on how to fix this?

Are there any brackets with swing clamps that would go further back?

  • Another way to think about this is: what kind of low voltage bracket to use for an extra thick wall? For example a wall with double drywall or through a mounted cabinet with solid back panel. – Droopycom Dec 24 '15 at 9:02
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    Although you made a nice text description I think it would be really helpful to see a photo looking into the hole that you made. – Michael Karas Dec 24 '15 at 13:01
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It was not particularly clear from your posting just what this 1x4 is in the wall. If it was flat to the back side of the drywall surface and went up at an angle in one direction and down at an angle in the other direction then this is a big problem. In this case this 1x4 is a cross brace installed in notches across a batch of studs. It's purpose is to triangulate with the studs to stiffen the building structure and keep things square. This would have been something that should not have been cut. Instead you should have moved your hole over and patched over the first hole.

  • The 4" side of the 1x4 is flat against the back of the drywall, and is vertical. I assume it's there to hold a drywall patch. – Droopycom Dec 25 '15 at 22:09
  • @Droopycom - If the 1x4 is vertical it could have been placed there for backer for a drywall seam. This could come onto play when the normal placement of a stud was not possible due to ducting pipe passing up the wall cavity in this area. – Michael Karas Dec 26 '15 at 4:13
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It sounds like you have something like this: https://www.menards.com/main/maintenance-repair-operations/lighting-electrical/wiring-connecting/electrical-boxes/pvc/legrand-1-gang-old-work-low-voltage-bracket/p-1444451151067-c-6431.htm?tid=8162418660492887955

If there is enough wood at the top and bottom of the hole you cut then just put some screws through the plastic on the opposing corners from the brackets into the wood behind it. Between the brackets and the screws that should keep it solid.

Happy Festivus!

  • This is something similar. I tried to screw the thing through drywall and wood, but unfortunately there is not enough overlap for it to hold. – Droopycom Dec 25 '15 at 22:16
  • You may be able to match the screw that the bracket uses with a longer one. Then reinsert it into the wall and have it grip the full thickness of the drywall plus the board. – ArchonOSX Dec 26 '15 at 12:17
  • This doesn't work well because the clamp rest in a groove that act as a stop to prevent the clamp from turning freely when tightening the clamp. With longer screws, the clamp would be beyond the groove and may turn freely when tightened. – Droopycom Dec 30 '15 at 8:10
  • Yeah you would have to reach in there with your hand or something and hold the clamp until it is tight. – ArchonOSX Dec 30 '15 at 14:11

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