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For indoor use, in living and bedroom. Search for 'wantrn 3 in 1 mosquito trap' should see something like

wantrn 3 in 1 mosquito trap

Description says it uses CO2 - carbon dioxide. I know its harmless unless there is so much that it removes O2 from the area, but what is too much? Is this safe? I have a lot of mosquitoes around. I've tried the light, and chemicals, but neither has worked.

Any other child friendly mosquito stoppers?

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    Indoors or outdoors? Outdoors, the "Mosquito Magnet" and similar devices are supposed to work to some degree. They burn propane to produce warm, moist CO2, mimicing a breathing animal and luring the skeeters into the trap. Indoors, I know of nothing that works safely on mosquitoes. Best bet is to improve your screens to keep them from getting indoors in the first place. – keshlam Sep 21 '14 at 20:34
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  • Indoors is the main concern outdoors - would be great too. but most of time that is at a public park – tgkprog Sep 22 '14 at 12:43
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There are conflicting reports about the health risks involved with burning citronella indoors and I do not encourage it. If you plan to use a candle indoors as a device I strongly suggest using an inclosed candle box. Fire is a guest in your house and sometimes gets hungry. Also, citronella repels mosquitoes, it doesn't kill them. I suppose this would make them go into the other room at least. Used outdoors, tiki-torches and candles should be relatively safe, health-wise.

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Does a Wantrn really work? Reading "also there is so high Voltage, So it’s very high safe and Quiet." in the product description is not encouraging. But the technology seems sound. CO2 and UV attracts, fan sucks them in and keeps them there. Perhaps it does work so long as there's power.


Even if it is one of models that work, your mileage may very:

Government studies find the Mosquito Magnet line very effective, user postings paint a more nuanced picture. For example, the nearly 30 users posting to Amazon.com give the Patriot an average score of 3 out of 5 stars, with some calling it effective and others complaining that mosquitoes are still plentiful. Some who report success say it may be necessary to test the trap in multiple locations to find an optimum spot. Many also note that the trap is expensive to maintain, as the propane, optional chemical attractants, catch net and cleaning cartridge must be replaced periodically.

An excerpt from a highly suggested read and its links to other studies, before you drop that kind of money. I wouldn't feel safe with a propane model indoors. CO2 is not harmless but I wouldn't be concerned at all with the levels from one without a tank, even used indoors. However, being the guardian of a child a little research on the exact output is warranted. A good question might be how many CFM's a given space needs to keep the air fresh with a continual input of X number PPM of CO2.

  • thank you. Will give you bounty in a day, unless anything else new posted. – tgkprog Sep 29 '14 at 9:26
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    Re anecdotal experience with mosquito magnets: Part of the problem is that there may be a LOT of mosquitoes in the area, and more may fly in if they smell something interesting upwind, so may need to make a significant dent in the entire neighborhood's population before you notice any difference... I have no idea whether UV attracts skeeters at all, but more than once I've been tempted to hang a UV bug-zapper indoors to get rid of the occasional annoying fly... though the cats would object to my taking their toy away. – keshlam Sep 29 '14 at 14:04
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Citronella oil, perhaps? It's available in various formats, though the candle version is extremely popular.

I bought a few of those candles from a roadside stand on a previous visit to India, and I can vouch that they're effective even against mosquitoes in Minnesota :)

I've used them indoors and they appear to be safe. We have a 3yo and I don't think I would hesitate to use such candles around her (fire concerns considered, of course).

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+50

There are a few approaches to preventing mosquitoes from showing up.

  1. Remove/reduce sources of mosquito habitat, like standing water or areas of high moisture. If you are like me and near woods and water you cannot really do anything about this.
  2. Encourage mosquito predators bats, dragonflies and purple martins (type of bird). They will work for you and at no cost or risk to you.
  3. Discourage inviting mosquitoes into your home. Check window screens and other opening where they can enter and fix them. Seal gaps or spaces between windows or door frames.
  4. Divert their attention away from you and then TRAP! them. Create mosquito traps, some basic varieties use brown sugar, yeast and water and a plastic bottle. The yeast creates CO2 which attracts the mosquitoes and the plastic bottle traps them.
  5. Discourage them to approach you Wear something that makes them NOT want to approach you.

Since your question is about dealing with mosquitoes indoors, spraying or using citronella or other chemicals is not an option. So keep them out and trap the ones that do enter.

  1. Create a mosquito trap(s) in areas of either high volume of mosquitoes or where you think they maybe entering your home.

  2. Seal and fix any openings so they cannot enter your home.

Hopefully some of these suggestions helped!

  • Is #5 a t-shirt that says "I Kill Mosquitoes"? I am assuming these are English reading mosquitoes. – DMoore Sep 29 '14 at 15:05
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    I was leaning more towards those wrist bands or belt clips that are now being marketed or a spray like Off!. I believe mosquitoes do not migrate too far so the local language is probably the best choice to assume they can read :) – treeNinja Sep 29 '14 at 15:31
  • what is #4 ? what traps? – tgkprog Sep 30 '14 at 16:50
  • Google will have a bunch of varieties, however here is a link to how to build a basic trap. link – treeNinja Sep 30 '14 at 19:28
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I have a few questions but rather than ask I can only assume that you live in a home that is open to the elements (as you can not close windows/doors or use screens. if you have standing water under your home, mosquitoes are very good at coming up through the floor through cracks etc. This brings up another list of concerns as well, but screening under the home would make a difference.

First, Lets go outside:

I would recommend Cutter outdoor spray around the perimeter of your home in an attempt to push the mosquitos away from your home. There is a natural product that uses plant oils and I have found it effective (http://www.homedepot.com/p/Cutter-32-fl-oz-Ready-to-Spray-Concentrate-Natural-Bug-Control-HG-95962/203381879?N=5yc1vZc5w2). It only works for a few weeks.

If you have standing water near your home that can not be removed, use Mosquito Dunks (http://www.homedepot.com/p/Summit-12-in-Mosquito-Dunks-6-Pack-110-12/100334779?N=5yc1vZc5w2). This is a biological agent that kills larva and is harmless to the environment. The object is to reduce the population outside so that fewer mosquitos can make it inside.

Inside

I very cheap and effective system is mosquito netting over the childrens beds.

And finally, a secret we used in the Marine Corps.... Avons "skin so soft". It is good for the skin and works better than any over the counter bug spray. It also does not smell like the chemical sprays (off/cutter, etc.)

  • Doors are shut, but they still get in. Yeah could improve on screens, but need to open for a few hours a day or feel like these is no fresh air – tgkprog Sep 29 '14 at 18:47
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    They should not be able to come in. There is something wrong, so the key needs to be to find the point of entry. (A mosquito every now and then is normal) They can be coming through the attic, or floor, attic if you have ventilation with holes in it, the floors if you are on a crawl-space. Windows and screens of course, and seals around the doors. Even plumbing if the sewage lines are somehow exposed to open air. In all cases, I would recommend that you fix the access/entry problem. Sorry I cant help more, but it sounds like you are trying to fix the symptoms of a bigger problem – Richard Mudd Sep 30 '14 at 21:12
  • Got it, thanks will look at this too, there are a few screens we need tighten up. – tgkprog Oct 1 '14 at 7:29
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Thanks for the info. Got the wantrn lamp 5 days back. Keep it on between 6 and 11pm. It has killed 5 mosquitoes so far. Not great but better than nothing.

Besides this what works for me:

  1. I like the mosquito bats - well the old 2 AA battery powered ones. The new rechargeable are too damn heavy for prolonged hunting
  2. Clapping them out with your hands works, ichky but they are dead. Also when they are on roof, throwing something like BIG diaper pack wrapped in PVC squishes them. Need to clean up but again small price for kid to be bitten less.
  3. the electric are okay too, though after a while mosquitoes harden up
* Need to try the child bands especially when outdoors
* After reading article - soot not good for lungs, dont plan touse citronella though ordered.  going to use when electronic not good enough, at least they will go to other room, keep it on for 30 minutes before sleep  

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