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I'm planning on building a shed on a sloped area. I've decided to build a gravel pad framed by 6x6's to create a level surface for the shed.

How can I anchor the shed to the gravel pad? (It's required in my area.) Would eye anchors hold in the gravel? Can I attach tie downs to the frame? Any ideas appreciated.

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  • If there is code for anchors then there may be code for specifics on anchors. NO, gravel will not hold an anchor. Have you researched "How to anchor a shed to the ground?"
    – Alaska Man
    Jun 11 '20 at 18:25
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    Most locations today have code requirements for such buildings which are designed to keep them in place during weather events. You should check with your local zoning officials for their standards for anchoring the building.
    – jwh20
    Jun 11 '20 at 18:32
  • I've I've tried to research ways--eye anchors, concrete pylons, mobile home tie-downs--but I haven't seen any articles that address what to do on a gravel bed.
    – Sean
    Jun 11 '20 at 19:08
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Your anchors can pass through the gravel into the soil/earth below. Ensure that you have anchors of sufficient length to pass requirement for your area and the gravel aspect becomes unimportant. By that, I mean, install the anchors, then place the gravel.

A quick search presented screw-in anchors with 66" total length. If you do not have bedrock at such a shallow depth (for bedrock), you may be able to use such an anchor to meet code.

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  • Thanks. Will the anchors screw in through the gravel or should I place the anchors first and compact the gravel around them?
    – Sean
    Jun 12 '20 at 15:30
  • Your anchors are outside of the shed perimeter which means the gravel compactness won't matter, generally speaking.
    – fred_dot_u
    Jun 12 '20 at 21:42
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I can't address your codes;but I have an 8 X 12 that just sits on cinder blocks . It hasn't moved in 20 years . It has built in shelves holding about 600 lb of stuff which may help. When Harvey hit ,we got 40" of rain in a couple days and the only problem was the end of a 100' pine laid on it ( didn't move it ). I figure if it blows away I will have bigger problems than a garden shed. I should be clear, I am in the "piney woods" and storm damage is nearly all the result of falling trees not direct wind. If you are on the plains of Kansas , that is different.

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    My municipality requires anchors. I'd rather just do it while I'm building rather than have the inspector tell me to do it and get it re-inspected.
    – Sean
    Jun 12 '20 at 15:29

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