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I recently had a stove fitted and have used it 5 times in total each time it has set off my smoke alarm but the installer said this may happen as the stove needs to burn off the fuels and solvents, each time i have only lit small fires and let them burn out naturally.

The first time it gave off a horrible smell when burned the smell hasn't been as bad since but i still keep the room well ventilated.

My installer recommended i give it a good burn today to get rid of the smell totally and keep the bottom vent open, i did this and the fire was really roaring but now i have fine hairline cracks in my chimney breast and also cracks in the back panel. I spoke to the installer again and he said he had never heard of this before.

The chimney breast was warm to touch and so was the mantel. I'm seriously regretting having it fitted.

Any help would be appreciated?

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  • We need pictures to be of any help at all. – Paul Logan Dec 30 '17 at 20:57
  • this phrase makes no sense burn off the fuels and solvents .... there is something you are not telling us – jsotola Dec 30 '17 at 22:24
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    What is the construction of the chimney? If it is a brick chimney, does it have a tile or masonry liner? All solid fuel heating units need to be used with a class A venting system which can be made of masonry or metal. – d.george Dec 31 '17 at 12:11
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As far as the smell your installer is correct, the paints and cleaners on the stove need to out gas. This can take a few hours to a few days depending on how hot you get the stove. When we used to install stoves we use to warn folks not to get the stacks above 500 deg and would leave a magnetic temp gauge on the stack. For inserts we recommended a bulb type gauge that could be placed on the stack and the gauge could be routed to the front. Getting a rip roaring fire can cause damage to the stack, a standard fire running for several hours can and will make most brick work warm to the touch and depending on the fans or just plain heat coming from the stove the mantle will heat up. Since you now have cracks the system should be inspected. I hope they added a liner (required in my area) if a metal liner was added and you did not melt it down it should be safe to use. I would get a mechanical bulb type temp gauge that has a range at least to 500f. And install that so you don't overheat the stack again. As for other cracks and issues we would need photos to be of any help there.

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What is the construction of the chimney? If it is a brick chimney, does it have a tile or masonry liner? All solid fuel heating units need to be used with a class A venting system which can be made of masonry or metal. – d.george 6 secs ago edit

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