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Trying to understand the workings of the house. Where will I be able to find a plumbing diagram for my house? Does the City Hall/Planning have a copy?

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    There might be a copy of plans submitted for a building permit. Or your town may not keep them forever. Also recognize that the is a difference between "plans" and "as built" which can differ. – Tyson Jan 20 '17 at 3:13
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    The existing plans (assuming they do still exist) will be mostly for the intent of the structure (ie. layout of lumber, joist and beam locations, truss design, etc). It might also include electrical outlet locations, but generally the actual details of the plumbing are left up to the contractor. In other words, apart from the locations of bathrooms and kitchens and other plumbed in areas, there really won't be much of a plumbing "plan" on paper. It usually depends on the local codes and the discretion of the contractor. – Octopus Jan 20 '17 at 3:27
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    Contact the builder or architect. You might find a book with basic housing plans that match your home to get a better idea as most homes with similar floor plans are the same with regard to the plumbing, electrical and framing. The permitting authority has copies of the plans during construction but I don't know if these are archived once the structure is finished usually the plot plan is the only thing I have found on record. – Ed Beal Jan 20 '17 at 14:09
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    Probably faster and easier to bring a plumber in for an hour or two. He should be able to map it out for you pretty easily. – Carl Witthoft Jan 20 '17 at 15:50
  • When was the house built? What region is it located in? – wallyk May 10 '17 at 15:36
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In a typical residential build, the plans are not that detailed. You've probably seen movies and TV shows, where they lay out a blueprint of a building that contains all the plumbing and wiring in the building. Unfortunately, detailed plans like that, almost certainly don't exist for your home.

The blueprint for the home will show where each plumbing fixture should go, but it's up to the plumber to connect the dots. The chances of the plumber taking the time to map out where each pipe was installed, is slim to none.

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