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I have a room which is getting too hot during winter and I want to disconnect the hot water baseboard in it from the heating system. Problem is that heating system is a loop and room is in the middle. Do I have to open the wall and rewire the pipes behind it ? Is there a less extensive solution ? Could a zone valve help here?

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2 Answers 2

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Build a nice looking wooden cover and line the inside with 1/2 rigid foam insulation. Place it over the baseboard to insulate it. There is no fire danger because it's hydronic.

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  • Nice! Thanks for the suggestion. Will definitely trying smth along those lines.
    – Lou
    Sep 27, 2020 at 0:04
  • Good, If you liked it, please give me an up vote and accept it as an answer. Mama needs s new pair of shoes! LOL Sep 27, 2020 at 1:32
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If you put the housing back together you will see that there is a movable damper that allows you to block airflow and reduce the amount of heat that gets transferred to the room.

If you are sure you don't want it to put heat into this room, you could remove the finned radiator part and replace that section with a straight copper pipe. That will allow other rooms that this loop serves to continue to get heat. A "zone" valve will affect all the radiators on that loop which is OK if that's what you want.

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  • Interesting! Thanks for the info. Just to confirm, the pipe which is there already (after removing the finned radiator) is not a copper pipe ? Zone valve is a bad idea apparently.
    – Lou
    Sep 26, 2020 at 17:50
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    I have an idea: first, I remove the finned radiator part. Then, I insulate the copper pipe with a 1/2 in. x 6 ft. Foam Pipe Insulation (homedepot.com/p/…)
    – Lou
    Sep 26, 2020 at 18:26
  • @Lou the finned pipe IS a copper pipe with radiating fins attached to it. Replacing it with non-finned pipe will reduce, not eliminate, the amount of heat that is radiated into the room. This requires plumbing soldering skills, turning off the boiler, making sure there is not water or glycol in the pipe so you can get a successful solder joint. Then purging the boiler and the zones/loops of ALL air. The supply pipes may be in the wall or they may be in the floor or a combo of both.
    – Alaska Man
    Sep 26, 2020 at 19:02
  • Thanks @AlaskaMan for the clarification. That is what I was thinking: it is a copper pipe already. No need to replace it then. I will just remove the fins and put some fiber glass insulation on it and see if that cut the heat by at least half.
    – Lou
    Sep 26, 2020 at 19:38
  • I believe the fins are soldered on. I have never seen ones that had removable fins.
    – Alaska Man
    Sep 26, 2020 at 19:57

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