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enter image description hereI am trying to take down a load bearing wall and have had an engineer draw plans and advise I use a steel beam and columns to support the floor above. Do I need something to secure the columns to the floor so they do not move or can the rest direct into the concrete floor? I live in Scotland which tends to have different laws than the rest of the UK.

columns 90 x 6.3 SHS beam 178 x 102 x 19 UB

The beam will have JJI joists resting on it. I have a 3 floor terraced house and the work is being carried out on the ground floor.

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  • Usually steel posts have plates welded to the ends with bolt holes punched in them. We'd need more detail about your columns to answer, though.
    – isherwood
    Nov 14 '19 at 15:55
  • I’m trying to load image of plans but struggling on phone. Will switch to laptop Nov 14 '19 at 15:55
  • Not the plans so much, but the metal bits.
    – isherwood
    Nov 14 '19 at 15:56
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    yes, you want them attached, as a home inspector explained to me, in case of earthquake, kids, or accidentally bumping into one with your arms loaded. Strictly speaking, that doesn't provide support, but it provides robustness.
    – dandavis
    Nov 14 '19 at 16:28
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    I'd go back to the engineer. You may need to crack concrete and dig a new footing. When I did a similar thing, I needed to dig down 18" add some rebar, and re-pour concrete. Nov 14 '19 at 16:48
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Either the plate with bolt holes as suggested.

Or you could bolt some blocks to the floor on each side of the beam to stop it moving - especially if it does not have a plate already.

But some method of stopping it moving too easily is sensible - "just in case"...

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  • If blocks were used, you’d want them on all 4 sides of the column to keep it from moving in both directions.
    – Lee Sam
    Nov 14 '19 at 16:15
  • @LeeSam each side... means all four, not any two of choice...
    – Solar Mike
    Nov 14 '19 at 16:26
  • Exactly. Regardless of local code, failure to secure posts at either end is a ReallyBadIdea(TM) Nov 14 '19 at 19:03

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