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I want to prevent moss from growing on my sheds roof, and I've read that copper (zinc, or lead) flashing can be used to prevent the moss.

I'm cheap, and don't want to buy copper flashing. However, I have a ton of old copper wire laying around. If I strip the insulation (obviously), can I tack the wire to the roof instead of copper flashing?

The roof is covered in asphalt shingles.

  • It'll still be green, just copper oxide green instead of moss green. And I suspect you'll need to use copper tacks to avoid electrochemical corrosion destroying it within a few months. Is there any chance of melting down the copper and making your own flashing? – Andrew Morton Oct 9 '17 at 18:40
  • What is your roof material ? ; If galvanized steel , the copper will accelerate corrosion. Sell the copper wire and buy flashing. – blacksmith37 Oct 9 '17 at 18:46
  • @AndrewMorton Yeah... I hadn't thought of that. Maybe I'll have to go with zinc, to avoid copper oxide. – Tester101 Oct 9 '17 at 18:47
  • @blacksmith37 Updated the question. Good point, maybe it's time for another trip to the scrapyard. – Tester101 Oct 9 '17 at 18:48
  • Yeah, I've been thinking about stripping 14 gage wire, and using super glue to surface mount the wires between the shingle gaps so it can remain well hidden, and still do the job well. – Satan Mar 26 '18 at 14:39
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The wire might turn green eventually (first it will turn black, in most conditions), the roof won't get nearly enough copper on it to turn green from a strip of wire or flashing at the peak.

I've done this on my parents' house - we just tucked it under shingles to hold it in place, which worked well enough as far as I recall. "Tacking" to me, implies potential new holes/leaks - but if you used copper nails and nailed under shingle flaps, might be OK. If there's a peak, put it there. If it's a single-slope roof, tuck it into the highest row of shingles. The tucked under part does no good against moss, it's the part sticking out in the weather that does that - the tucked under part is just to hold it in place.

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