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An Old Debate There are is a very old debate about whether it's better to leave the thermostat at a constant temperature or to turn the temperature down when unoccupied and up when occupied. I am in the heat-as-needed camp that believes in turning the heat up and down. One Argument From a theoretical perspective, I think about it this way: Your furnace ...


8

Setting back your thermostat to any reasonable temperature for any reason amount of time will only save 5-10% over the course of a season. Apples to apples You can't simply compare your bill to your neighbor's bill. There are very numerous reasons why this is impractical. Different construction, exposure, consumption, equipment and more. Even two houses ...


6

Our heating bills are about 25% higher than our average neighbors according to our bill, yet our temperature is always as low as we can stand it (mid 50's), we have excellent insulation throughout the house, we don't have drafty windows, and our furnace is a brand new natural gas system. The WAY we are heating is one of the last variables to explore. I'm ...


5

The zone board's gone bad Since upstairs is broken, yet downstairs is fine, and it's not a thermostat issue, I'd point the finger at the zone board having something wrong with it. Just to make sure, try pulling the upstairs thermostat and jumpering R to W on its base; if the heat doesn't come on, then something's dead with the W input for that zone.


5

And are there any other factors to consider? There is one factor of note that you have attempted to consider: we don't have drafty windows Unfortunately, the idea that windows are a major factor in a house's draftiness (or more technically, air change rate) is a common misconception. The reality is that the vast majority of draftiness is completely ...


3

unfortunately the ecobee is not set up to do that. Each thermostat only controls one heating zone, regardless of the quantity of room sensors. The way the sensors are used is fairly flexible. They can be included in an average with the t-stat and other sensors to trigger heat demand, and they can individually be included/excluded in different "comfort ...


2

Choice of normally open or normally closed for a valve actuator is part of the overall controls design process, part of which is considering safety/protective functions. As an example, consider a climate where it gets freezing cold (below 0 degrees C). You have a normally closed heating valve that is closed. Something happens such that your electronic ...


2

It is a myth that furnaces need to work "harder" if turned off for a while or if the room cools or heats too much. This has been tested and is recommended even by the government: https://www.energy.gov/energysaver/thermostats https://blog.powerley.com/mythbuster-using-a-thermostat-setback-for-energy-savings/ You should have your thermostat as cold as ...


2

Hey I am a professional hvac contractor that specific zone board will not do 3 stages of heat so it will not work with a 2 stage heat pump and heat strips you need to replace that board with Honeywell hz432 zone board tha th should fix your issues


2

It's complete BS. If that was actually a problem, then the system wouldn't let you do that.


1

Your idea is full of holes as we like to say. As @Ecnerwal stated in his response, you have an area with a different heat loss and gain from the rest of the house. Just adding a supply and return duct will not provide a good result. It would be great if this idea would solve your problem but I doubt it will. If you live in a warm climate, this will not add ...


1

After speaking to a service tech, I've confirmed that the design of the Taco valves is that the boiler contact is not energized when in manual override. However, he also stated that he's seen cases where they failed with the contact energized, so I'm planning to disconnect that wire if I have a similar situation in the future.


1

What you are seeing is actually normal IMHO and as a result of the second law of thermodynamics. Heat travels from hot things to cold things. You are under the impression heat rises. That is only true for AIR. It is NOT true for solid objects. I assume this is house-on-slab not house-on-crawlspace or house-on-basement. Your downstairs is like a piece of ...


1

You're right: the wiring colors as installed are "wrong" according to convention. The arrangement in the "after" drawing should satisfy the thermostats and operate the system correctly. Because the wire colors are confusing it may be a good idea to re-mark them. You could get colored heat shrink tubing and use it to put a colored band on ...


1

One of those transformer terminals is "R" the other is "C" If the red wire joins to the thermostat "R" wires then the beige wire is "C" Thermostat wires should not be inside that junction box with the mains wiring, get a new box for the thermostat wires.


1

The problem with one pump and valves is that you can't ensure that you always get the flow you want when one of the valves is closed vs. both open. So things can be difficult to balance. With two pumps there is more control and you should get more even heating. Unless you have a strong reason to do it another way, I recommend you take the advice of the ...


1

This isn't an "answer" but a caution. I have a hydronic, in floor heating system in my house and let me tell you, there is a LOT of design and engineering to do to get this right. Even the tubing layout in the floor has design criteria (pattern should be that half way thru the loop, the tubing should parallel the first part for more even heat ...


1

I turned off both valves 1 & 2 figuring it isolated most things and valve 2 didn't seem to close all the way. The steps I used to drain were: turn supply off turn return off open hose bibb open bleeder valve on register farthest away. If you don't do this, it seems to drain very slowly. When refilling/purging, it seemed to go better/faster if that ...


1

Radiators don't put out a lot of heat at that temperature, so you'd need a lot more area, so the heating loop usually runs warmer than you'd really want the hot water cylinder to get up to, so the boiler thermostat setting is a bit of a compromise with a system with no diverter. Combi boilers that are either heat or HW but not both, often do have different ...


1

That is correct, yes That is a correct way to wire the coil-sides of two isolation relays -- one end of the secondary provides C to the relay coils and thermostat C wires, while the other side of the secondary provides R to the thermostats, and the W wires from the thermostats go to the free terminals on the corresponding relay coils. The relay contacts ...


1

It does not need to be installed in the unconditioned space near the furnace. It should be in the duct that feeds all the others. Look for a powered humidifier. It will need a 120V outlet, water supply, water drain and it will need low voltage wires connecting it to the humidistat and the furnace. If the duct that feeds all the branch ducts is in an ...


1

I have used these N/O valves on a system that had a wood/coal boiler as a back up heating system so if properly piped could be used during periods of "power outages" to yield gravity flow and give some heat to the residence.


1

This comment pertains specifically to Taco valves, it may or may not be true of other valves intended for geothermal applications. Not all geo systems are open loop. [The geothermal valve] is made from materials that can resist oxygen corrosion more effectively than those in a Zone Sentry valve. Zone Sentry valves are designed for use in closed-loop ...


1

There may be other differences as well but the geothermal valve is designed for a higher head pressure. The standard hydronic system is built around reduced pressure. The geothermal valve is expected to deal with standard water pumping and or city pressure.


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