New answers tagged

2

You need insulation a looooot more than you need active cooling. Think "ounce of prevention, pound of cure". The main source of your heat is not ambient air. It's solar load, and there's your Google word. The solar load, by itself, will have a "Bridge on the River Kwai" effect - and if this is still not clear to you, sit in a car in the direct sun, ...


2

There are air conditioners using sea water, rather than a heat pump, but that works because ocean water is usually well below 10° C (50° F). Using a canal would be less corrosive, but you'd need a heat-pump to get useful cooling. Some examples of air conditioners using sea water to cool the condenser are at Flagship Marine. That said, you'd need to check ...


1

Just get the proper sized window a/c unit. Modern window units are cheap and efficient. Do regulations allow one to pump water out of this canal and then return it to the canal warmed up? Using city water will not work unless you could keep the water running constantly.


0

Given your 3-wire supply, you could only use that for a) 240V-only service (no 120V), or b) 120V-only service (no 240V). There's a third option that involves a supply transformer, but it's complicated. Running 240V-only is dangerous because "the next guy" will interpret the panel as an old-school 120/240V panel, and insert 120V circuits in it because he ...


0

You need to figure the maximum current that could flow given the size of your feeding breaker, size the wires to match, then use large enough conductors based on the distance they need to run. The are charts that show code permissible sizing for given aperage, esp. over distances. To wire the remote building, you need to install a sparate ground (like a rod,...


1

You can put in a sub you need 4 wires ground , neutral and your 2 Hots. Since the shop is detached you will need to have a ground rod and #6 wire is normal for you his , I would consider running a larger feeder wire than #10 but if only running 1 saw and your lighting #10 could work. Even though you have the wiring protected at the main panel with a 30 amp ...


1

Many years ago my father just drived a pretty big nail to wall, near the table. You can easily hang big/small pliers on it, they're pretty stable and easy to access.


1

In lean manufacturing circles as well as aerospace vehicle maintenance an accepted way to deal with tools is with foam cutout tool trays, either canted near the work surface or hanging on the wall. Google for "lean foam tool wall" etc. You'll quickly see that Fastcap's company founder has produced a bunch of youtube videos about this -- here are a couple ...


5

Here's yet another tools-on-the-wall idea. This is light gauge galvanized sheet metal -- probably 24 ga from the HVAC duct aisle at the local big box store. The non-magnetic tools (flux pens, tweezers, etc) have a magnet bonded to them with epoxy; the magnetic tools have a magnet epoxied to the steel sheet instead.


3

It looks like there's a window behind the desk but you mention a wall so as others have mentioned, a pegboard is a cheap and simple solution. Make sure you mount it with spacers behind it so that you can actually get the accessories in. These 'plier holders' are perfect for this: They are less than a dollar each. The tool goes in business-side down. If ...


14

You say hanging them on a wall is acceptable. In that case: Put them against the wall. Grab one at your nearest toolshop or hardware store or make one yourself. All you need is a piece of metal/wood, stick it to a wall and put screws, nails, clips or other objects in it to hang your tools on. The boards with pre-fab holes in them are pegboards.


17

How about something like this? https://www.amazon.com/Olsa-Tools-Pliers-Organizer-Storage/dp/B01M27BV34 If you want more ideas then run a Google search for "plier rack"


7

I use a grey foam block like is typically used for packing or cut out in shape for instrumentation cases: I use an X-Acto knife to cut out slots for the heads of the tools that roughly contour the shape of the head, but slightly smaller for a snug fit: This provides immediate access to my most commonly used tools, with each tool having it's own location to ...


0

Pegboard, or a magnetic tool holder (Harbor Freight sell those for only a few dollars)


6

I would get a board (of ply or similar) and lay out the pliers etc in a sensible arrangement. Then insert a screw for each tool so that the tool sits on the screw by its hinge when the board is vertical. Probably cheaper than buying a board that may be larger than what you need... You could also add elastic across the handles and make it so the board is ...


14

The problem is you are using office supply organizers for tools. Try hitting one of the Borgs (Home Depot, Lowes or Menards) and visit their tool section. They should have plenty of tool organizers. Be warned: they won't work very well on office supplies.


17

Here is my invention for you. It is a board. The pliers and snips that volunteered for this project straddled it nicely. If you cut off the ends of the board and reattached them at right angles (with glue or a screw) so it looks like a letter I it would be steadier than this one, which was propped on the 2x4 back there. The little red pliers did not ...


3

Typical is a wall rack with holes in which one part of the handle is inserted. Wooden home-made or wire/plastic for pegboard mounting purchased. If you want it on the desktop rather than wall-mounted, then a stand supporting a board which has holes drilled along the edges. Some results (unlike those) I have not seen in person show up when I put "plier rack"...


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