21

If you consider the physics of this, the B wedge is going to apply more outward force on the cleat attached to the wall then the A wedge for a given amount of weight supported. So you might cause the attachment to the wall to fail long before you would be reaching the capacity of the bolt's shear limit. Generally a relatively shallow angle will give you all ...


9

I prefer the "up and over" method rather than drilling thru the studs, esp. since you don't intend to finish the walls. Not sure what code says about that. I believe that exposed cable below a certain height needs to be protected (8 feet?) So that would mean running the cable in conduit for the 4-5' from the outlet to near the top plate. When I ...


8

Yeah, that's wrong. The inspector ought to know better; clearly does not inspect a whole lot of commercial installations. Gently stand up on the point and show him the code, and leave him a path to keep his ego intact (that is less than you pulling a bunch of pointless ground wires). That's part of negotiating. By the way, if you do pull the trigger on ...


6

Lights on their own breaker is good. One breaker per wall is dubious. If you alternate the breakers feeding outlets there's a bit more wire, but when you are working in an area and plug two things into adjacent outlets, less chance of a trip. Or, use dual-gang plates/boxes and put the two duplex outlets in each box on different breakers. You can use ...


6

My imperfect grasp of physics would tell me that the strength would be equal in both cases, however, B is more likely to jam & be hard to remove later. The downward force is equal in both cases, the adhesion/grip force will be greater in B. There's potentially a leverage force also in B, but my high-school physics says that will be too small to come into ...


5

I don't know that the strength really lies in the angle. If I were picking, I'd go with X over Y, but because you don't want to create too much of a wedge between the cleat and the wall (Y will put more stress on the cleat fasteners). The bevel helps it not slide off the cleat. The main advantage of the cleat is you can mount a board to the wall in a secure ...


5

For line voltage (120/240 - all 120V to ground, so basically the same voltage from a code perspective) you don't need a divider. A divider is needed when you have low voltage (network/TV/phone) sharing with line voltage. Unless you are sticking in a 240/120 receptacle (like an L14-20) you'll only have one neutral, so @manassehkatz-Moving 2 Codidact's concern ...


5

This is fine, provided you obey a few rules While a MWBC serving a mix of 120V and 240V receptacles certainly may look strange to the uninitiated, or those who interact with electrical systems in a professional capacity yet are not trained to the full panoply of NEC requirements, this setup is Code-legal in the 2017 NEC, provided the breaker protecting it ...


4

400A boxes 400A panels are expensive because nobody does that. The normal thing to do with a 400A meter is immediately split it to two 200A main panels, just ordinary common-as-dirt main panels, nothing fancy at all. In fact, ordinary/common "class 320" (read: 400A) meter pans provide for two 4/0-sized lugs per phase. That's not for paralleling: ...


4

Locking the breaker is certainly an option (probably a good one). I would consider it a hassle to have to unlock the breaker before work and having to relock when done. However, I'd rather do that than have my child lose a finger. In addition to shielding our children from things it is important that we teach them to respect the shop area and to respect ...


3

You only need enough angle that whatever is being held won't get inadvertently bumped off the wall. For heavy things, that's not much at all. For lighter ones, a bit more angle may be needed, but A is already excessive, IME. 15 degrees (or 75, if you prefer to think that way) is plenty. Strength comes from length first, thickness second, and width (height, ...


3

The code requires that the box be "rigidly and securely fastened" to the purlin. Rivets seem OK to me, and I think would seem OK to most inspectors. Having some specs on the mechanical strength of the rivets might help you if there's a question. Rivets are specifically mentioned as an acceptable way to fasten a box to the frame of a ceiling grid. ...


3

Yes, you can do that and as you have noted, there are many used KWH meters for sale on EBAY and other places. A properly installed meter base along with a listed meter will do what you want and be compliant. It's not uncommon for such meters to be used with solar energy systems and such. I recommend the old-fashioned mechanical kind vs. the new digital ...


2

You will not be using everything all at the same time. So I would look at the nameplate Full Load Amps of your largest load, probably the table saw, plus any other things that might be running at the same time, such as the dust collector, lights and if the compressor is on a demand pressure switch, add that too because it might come one without you turning ...


2

If you really, really wanted to do it from the plug, then you need something called a Power Distribution Unit (PDU). The difference between that and something you could make is the UL Listing. However, since I supremely doubt you have anything that uses a NEMA 5-50, my advice is to tear the socket off the wall, fit a large 4-11/16” junction box there, and ...


2

The DriCore subfloor panels are perfect for this. Your main concern will be the tongue and groove panels separating, so if they are not firmly held on all 4 sides by the inner walls, install an outer frame of 1x4, or similar to make a tight box around the whole assembly. Obviously, leave the last side open until all the panels are in, then lock the last ...


2

Yeah, I work a lot with MWBC. That looks fine to me... It should limbo under the NEC 2017 guidelines. If you don't get this permitted by the time your state adopts NEC 2020, then your entire plan falls apart. At that point you'll need a 2-pole GFCI breaker, and the GFCI recep will be superfluous. Your best defense to NEC 2020 is to get a HUGE panel. ...


2

Penny-pinching now puts you in a bind later There are two main problems with the setup you propose. First off, it relies on the rule of six as the meter-main you propose requires two separate breakers to be thrown to disconnect all the power; this is an issue because that rule is being curtailed in the 2020 NEC to prohibit a single panelboard enclosure from ...


2

I interpret the 2014 code requirement the same way. However the real question is how does the AHJ in you area interpret the code. You might check with him about what they require before making a decision.


2

Since you're not finishing the walls (ie covering with drywall) then the wiring can be seen. If its exposed, it can be damaged easier. Personally I'd look at installing a series of dwangs (nods) across the wall, that can be used as storage shelves. If there's one just at the height of your outlets, then the cable can be secured under that shelf and pass ...


2

Your plan sounds good Drilling the studs is fine and usually uses less wire. (Both are ok) Make sure your hole is 1-1/4” back from the face of the stud on either side. Your shop lights don’t require a GFCI if they are hard wired but if plugged in they do require a GFCI (crazy I know but code is explicit there are no exceptions) You may think about outside ...


1

As you have noted too, sound proofing is a complex topic. Some published success stories are based on questionable data, others are based on specific cases, typically a basement / home theatre, or maybe a music room. Sound proofing is expensive in terms of labour and materials, making it difficult to attempt by trial and error. If your case falls clearly ...


1

It's a balance between additional stress on the fasteners and the outward force from the torque applied by the weight of the object and its leverage, or distance out from the wall. Imagine a 12" wide shelf attached to a 6" vertical, forming a 2:1 lever arm. Place a 10 pound object at the outside edge of the shelf: this applies 10 pounds downward ...


1

The kinds of loads that are commonly associated with nuisance tripping of AFCIs are those with brush-type AC motors, called "Universal" motors, because you have AC power going across brushes to a commutator like a DC motor would, so the AC coming from the AFCI breaker is seeing the arcing taking place in that commutator, which has a similar profile ...


1

Yes you can bottom feed the old panel, I have even seen panels put in upside down to save 2’ of wire., it looks like you have a mix of breakers the inspector may hit you on that. I might start moving neutrals and grounds around ahead of time it looks like neutral on the right and ground on the left and having that done ahead of time may help with the ...


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