17

Here is my invention for you. It is a board. The pliers and snips that volunteered for this project straddled it nicely. If you cut off the ends of the board and reattached them at right angles (with glue or a screw) so it looks like a letter I it would be steadier than this one, which was propped on the 2x4 back there. The little red pliers did not ...


17

How about something like this? https://www.amazon.com/Olsa-Tools-Pliers-Organizer-Storage/dp/B01M27BV34 If you want more ideas then run a Google search for "plier rack"


14

The problem is you are using office supply organizers for tools. Try hitting one of the Borgs (Home Depot, Lowes or Menards) and visit their tool section. They should have plenty of tool organizers. Be warned: they won't work very well on office supplies.


14

You say hanging them on a wall is acceptable. In that case: Put them against the wall. Grab one at your nearest toolshop or hardware store or make one yourself. All you need is a piece of metal/wood, stick it to a wall and put screws, nails, clips or other objects in it to hang your tools on. The boards with pre-fab holes in them are pegboards.


11

My suggestion is that you consider installing a ready made plug strip across the back of the work bench. These can be purchased from many suppliers and come with an already attached heavy duty power cord that you can attach to the home outlet. Here is an example of what I am suggesting: Let me also make another suggestion (coming from an experienced ...


11

It's all about Volt Amperes. NEC 2008 gives us an easy way to do things in residential. 220.82 Dwelling Unit. (A) Feeder and Service Load. This section applies to a dwelling unit having the total connected load served by a single 120/240-volt or 208Y/120-volt set of 3-wire service or feeder conductors with an ampacity of 100 or greater. It ...


10

reasons going to the service entrance will be difficult: you'll have to open the meter box, and most meter boxes are tamper sealed by the electric company so you will have to involve them. the meter box lugs are probably not sized for multiple connections. this creates a potentially dangerous wiring setup. someone may assume that the main panel in the house ...


9

This is not an answer related to code but simply doing the layman's math. First off the Freezer should be on a dedicated circuit. Not because of any excessive amperage draw, but because if you fire up the table saw and the dust collector at the same time and it pops the breaker, you don't want the freezer being shut off for potentially an undetermined ...


9

Yep. You can use shop vacs for this (albeit you might need some adapter hoses). A neat thing to get is a power switch that can switch on another appliance one the first is turned on. The idea is you plug your saw and your shopvac into it, and when you power on the saw, the shopvac powers on at the same time: http://www.amazon.com/Smart-Strip-SCG5-...


9

If it's a hand tool not designed to be mounted in that manner, I would advise against doing this as it has the potential to be dangerous. Think about what would happen if the tool were to become dislodged or the blade break off. In the event of an emergency, how would you quickly shut it off? Saws like table saws and band saws should have an easily ...


9

Echoing Steven's answer, I wouldn't do kitchen cabinets either. I would get/build a real workbench that can hold 100's of lbs on the surface. If you aren't up to building your own, you can buy some nice-looking kits from Lowe's, Home Depot, Sears, or Sam's Club. Maybe start with a ready-made workbench as the core of your workshop, and build the remaining ...


8

Pegboard attached to workbench will likely vibrate like crazy while you're trying to file, sand, saw, route, or hammer anything. It's safer to just put the pegboard on the wall.


8

I have a similar workbench but instead of finishing it, I screwed down (no glue) two layers of hardboard. It's cheap so I don't mind dinging it up and since it's only screwed down, it'll be easy to replace when it gets too dinged up.


8

That is a big piece of wood. There are three obvious approaches: Get some professionals to do it. A grand piano weighs more than that (and is more awkwardly shaped). Professionals will have the experience and equipment to do it safely, and the indemnity insurance to pay if anything gets damaged. Slide it gently down the stairs (possibly manufacturing a ...


7

I use a grey foam block like is typically used for packing or cut out in shape for instrumentation cases: I use an X-Acto knife to cut out slots for the heads of the tools that roughly contour the shape of the head, but slightly smaller for a snug fit: This provides immediate access to my most commonly used tools, with each tool having it's own location to ...


6

The epoxy glaze you cited is what us old timers used to call casting resin. We use it on bar tops to give good gloss and a hard finish. Sounds like a good choice to me, but several coats of good oil based urethane will also give you good results. Good Luck


6

Could you do it... Yes. There are a few problems with this setup. First, if the saw does not have a locking trigger how will you turn it on when you are cutting? If it does have a locking trigger, you'll want a way to turn the tool on/off quickly and easily. This could be achieved by connecting the saw to a power strip, and mounting the strip in an easily ...


6

I would get a board (of ply or similar) and lay out the pliers etc in a sensible arrangement. Then insert a screw for each tool so that the tool sits on the screw by its hinge when the board is vertical. Probably cheaper than buying a board that may be larger than what you need... You could also add elastic across the handles and make it so the board is ...


5

If you have the space, a freestanding workbench away from the wall is a great thing to have. It is much easier to move your body around the bench and workpiece than to rotate the workpiece, particularly when you would rather not disturb its position. You can make it strong with heavy construction (big strong legs). The drawback is the same as with any ...


5

Here's yet another tools-on-the-wall idea. This is light gauge galvanized sheet metal -- probably 24 ga from the HVAC duct aisle at the local big box store. The non-magnetic tools (flux pens, tweezers, etc) have a magnet bonded to them with epoxy; the magnetic tools have a magnet epoxied to the steel sheet instead.


4

Your question is a little broad, but I will interpret it to be something like "Can I use LED lighting sources to illuminate my workbench and desk?" Yes. While the purchase price of LEDs is still much higher than conventional bulbs or CFLs, the prices are dropping and you often can find sales. There are 75 watt led flood bulbs now available in the $20 range, ...


3

Using a jigsaw in a table setup is no more dangerous than using it handheld if the mounting is secure - the blade is not guarded when a jigsaw is used handheld either! If you really wanted a guard you could build one into a table mounted jigsaw. Several manufacturers even make table insert plates for their jigsaws similar to router mounting plates. I ...


3

I like installing it on the wall. Actually, one of the coolest workbenches I've seen recently had two layers of pegboard -- the outer layer swung open on hinges like a cabinet door to reveal the inner layer.


3

I've used spar urethane for this purpose. Be aware, though, that it will outgas for a long time if you don't expose it to the sun.


3

The type of cable you linked to is SE cable covered by Article 338 of the National Electrical Code. It connot be used underground with or without a raceway. Here is the pertinent code language. 338.12 Uses Not Permitted. (A) Service-Entrance Cable. Service-entrance cable (SE) shall not be used under the following conditions or in the following ...


3

ESPECIALLY with mostly gas appliances, I wouldn't worry about it. I have a small woodworking shop that I feed with a 60A feeder breaker and I have NEVER tripped it. What you have to remember is that if it's just YOU working in the shop, you are not going to be running more than one tool at a time, plus maybe a dust collector (highly recommended by the way) ...


3

I ran a small shop on 60 amps for many years. Unless you're running welders, large compressors or other big electric motors (5+ HP) you shouldn't have any trouble. Even with my 13 amp table saw, dust collector and the random chargers and stuff I have plugged in I never tripped the main. Can't imagine fridges and A/C could account for more than 50 amps


3

There is a great video on YouTube by "The Build Show" about various PEX and push to connect fittings. They pump them up until they burst. They burst well above the stated ratings. Unfortunately I can't answer the nylon pipe question but check out the video The Build Show with Matt Risinger 14,000 PSI test I temporarily installed PEX Airlines and PEX oil ...


3

Typical is a wall rack with holes in which one part of the handle is inserted. Wooden home-made or wire/plastic for pegboard mounting purchased. If you want it on the desktop rather than wall-mounted, then a stand supporting a board which has holes drilled along the edges. Some results (unlike those) I have not seen in person show up when I put "plier rack"...


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