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I worked in a lab, so SDS sheets and I are good friends. Non-hazardous materials have SDS sheets all the time. My favorite SDS sheet is [that of water][1]. You'll note that the "symptoms and effect" of water (a non-hazardous material) states "Not expected to present a significant hazard under anticipated conditions of normal use." That's not the same ...


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It should also be noted that for the unit to support any significant weight the 2x4 should be not be flat, they should be turned 90 degrees so they are vertical like floor joists. I would also ad plywood decking to ad strength and make a solid shelf surface. I found a web site that has a plan for some shelves. https://dadand.com/diy-2x4-shelving/ Since ...


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For how the shelf attaches to the uprights there should be a backup to the screws such that the self will rest on something even if the screws were to break. The simplest solution is to glue and screw a board just under where the shelf attaches. That will give greater surface area to the fastening than a few screws into endgrain. I can barely see some that ...


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I paid someone else to build this basic shelf for me because i'm no carpenter, Unfortunately, I am afraid the person that built this isn't either. There is a major weak point - the screws into the end grain of the cross pieces could just tear out of the wood. The gaps are not really the problem. There are a lot of stronger options for the joint but ...


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I've had occasional success with a left-hand drill bit. If the sheared end of the screw is relatively flat, or if you can get a small grinder into the hole to make it flat, then you could try this. It might be necessary to construct some kind of aid (a block on the surface, a tube going into the boss, etc) to keep the bit centered on the screw. A left hand ...


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I think the easiest solution would be to remove the plate, use a hole saw to remove the screw and the wood around the screw, and then plug the hole after with a dowel and glue.


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You could try taking a dowel rod that fits in the hole and drilling a 2 mm hole in the end of it. Put some epoxy in the hole you just drilled and then screw the dowel rod down onto the shank of the screw in the hole. Wait for the epoxy to harden and then try to "unscrew" the dowel rod from the hole backing the screw out with it. I know you don't want to ...


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