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Hot glue using a hot glue gun. It could be 'hidden' between the back of the light fixture and the log, much like your picture but without the string. And, for the most part, it will come off when you are done leaving less, in my experience, residue than wood or epoxy or other glues


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If you are using 1X4X10 horizontally, you may notice a bit of sag over time. The wider the board, the less likely it will sag. 1X8 would be a good choice, but if you think you are going to keep a consistent 1/4" gap across all boards, that will not happen. Not all the boards will be straight to begin with, and when moisture gets introduced into the mix of ...


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This is on topic no reason to close. On solid wood and laminated wood surfaces once they start to split it can be hard to stop. I have found oiling the wood can help usually the underside is not finished application of linseed oil has helped me in the past, also pulling the wood together with structural screws I have done this with large walnut pieces that ...


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There's generally greater success with making it a feature than trying to hide it. Clamping it together and gluing will generally fail unless it's also rehydrated to the level it was made at first, and then kept that way. So if you live with the air you have, not going to fly unless you buy locally made furniture or avoid solid wood in preference to veneers ...


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Fill the crack with wood glue and fix in the clamp for a one day


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I'm not sure how you're going to be able to do that with this hinge. There are a few tactical issues. First, the hinge requires a mortise which would typically be on the inside of the door. So now you'll have to figure out how to cut the mortise on the inside of the cabinet frame. Second, The hinge is a 110 degree hinge but it's meant to swing in the ...


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Some of these mouldings can be recreated by multiple router bits -- your run the top half through one router bit and the bottom half through another router bit. Bottom could be made by a triple bead router head, and the other half is a fairly standard profile -- possibly a cove, but hard to determine from your picture. Going to a specialty woodworking ...


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There are many ways to do this and which of them to choose depends on many things including what tools are available and the skill of the person using the tools. Back when I was a carpenter I would choose to use a reciprocating saw but this takes a decent level of skill to use to both get a good cut and also not hurt yourself. Upside, will cut through nails....


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I don't see why you need to tap the wooden shaft. Get some threaded rod, maybe 24" by M10. Drill 12" into each end of the shaft, snug fit but not threaded. Get some 20mm steel rod to go sideways through the shaft, two sections 2.5" long. Drill through the shafts sideways, maybe 9" from the join. Thread the short bars side to side to accommodate the M10 rod. ...


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I'd use heavy studding, perhaps M20, M22 or even M24 (3/4-1" if you don't do metric). In one piece, insert it as far as you can drill (at least 20 cm I reckon), glued for the whole length with epoxy. The drilled hole should be a snug fit. The matching threaded inserts are much too short to be of any use. Instead you'll need to make one: Buy tube and tap ...


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For a strong, practical answer, see Willk's answer. For a better looking answer, don't join on the outside, join on the inside. Get a 1 foot rod of metal which is thin but resists bending. It will be light compared to the wooden pole, so don't worry about that. Drill a 6-and-a-small-bit inch hole into each of the wooden rods, almost exactly the diameter of ...


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If you are going to be swinging this 2-part pike around like a weapon, there will be a lot of stress at the join. It would be good to spread that stress out. Obtain pipe the diameter of the 2 poles. Iron pipe would be strong but harder to work. PVC would be light and easy to work but less strong. Copper is expensive but strong enough, easy to drill and ...


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I think you need a threaded coupling that can be screwed into each end of the shaft. It's similar to what Ack recommends for pool cues but unfortunately cue joints won't have a 3" diameter. You can find this at your Home Center store and they're inexpensive and easy to install. Just drill the proper size hole in the end of each shaft and screw them in. The ...


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I would think that pool cue connectors would work great for this. Here is an example: https://www.aliexpress.com/i/4000427299129.html


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I am not seeing these caveats at all. There is a Canadian company that makes a product called a T-Stud which consist of two 2x3's and dowels. If this can be done to replace a 2x6 and is four times stronger I don't see why a I-Joist system couldn't be used to build a stud the same way without the complication of drilling and doweling all these holes for the ...


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