47

Welcome to the joys of working with a natural product! Before I address your construction techniques, I've got to say that is a quite handsome looking door you've made. Well done! Wood moves. It expands and contracts as temperature and humidity change. It's a "feature" of wood that you cannot and will not be able to change. It's so critical, common and ...


31

Slightly contrarian take: start over. (I know, you've done a bunch of work, etc. They call it the sunk-cost fallacy for a reason. Strong butt joints in the rail are possible but hard and would involve a ton of wood filler afterwards.) Get another door. Rough cut next to the hinge stile (but not cutting off the molding on the stile). Extract the panels and ...


24

It's important to remember the difference between a bolt and a screw (this is handy if you don't know the size of the bolt or screw) Screws have the threads doing the work of holding. Your hole should be the size of the screw shaft. In other words, hold a drill bit above the screw. You should still see the threads, but not the shaft. Bolts have a nut doing ...


19

When you buy a hex bolt, the size on the label is the diameter of the shank below the head. The outside diameter (aka major diameter) of the threads will be no larger than this diameter. So for a 3/8" bolt, it's simple - you drill a 3/8" hole.


16

How do I rectify this? This is my first project. That's an easy, inexpensive and useful first project. Even if the work is square and accurately cut, it's easy to be off by a couple millimeters. And even if you're not, it's easy for the floor to be off a couple millimeters; tile is not perfect. Your best bet is to do a web search for furniture leveling ...


16

In addition to the accepted answer, it would help to add some weather protection. A small rain shield or canopy will help divert weather from the upper part of the door. Essentially a small verandah to divert both rain and sun from the door without impeding access, and gives you shelter when opening the door in the weather. Awning, canopy, door shelter, ...


16

Whenever I want an arc that accurate I use my 3hp router (a smaller rated router will do too, just for smaller scale work) screwed to a shop made pivot (trammel) and make repeated passes, next pass deeper than the last to complete the cut. A circular saw may make that tight of a curve if you set the saw shallow enough to just cut through the material. It ...


14

I had the exact same problem and rather than removing the wood from under the counter, I totally removed the feet from the bottom of the washer and that gave me an extra 5/8". I put some thin furniture felt pads on the corners of the washer and it slid right into the space. If that doesn't float your boat, the Dremel with a routing bit will be accurate ...


13

This is a rare case where you want the hole to be somewhat larger than the bolt diameter, to allow some shifting and settling. For a 3/8" bolt the hole should be 1/2" or 5/8" diameter. You must use a fender washer under the nut. The squared and smoothed (deburred) ends of the side and end frame rails are what hold the leg square and prevent wobbling. The ...


13

A well-equipped hardware store will have a drawer with many common fasteners used in this type of flatpack furniture. I mean well-equipped. Home Depot is not a hardware store. ACE or better. Preferably that family-owned hardware store that has been there for 80 years and has creaky floors and weird little mezzanines with things just crammed everywhere. ...


12

The process is simple, but actually doing these things may take equipment and expertise that you lack. Find out WHY the floors are sagging. Is it due to improper foundation/footings? Is it due to failed or failing materials? Is the structure just inadequately design to support itself? Come up with a remediation plan to fix the issue(s) you identified. Do ...


10

If you are going to be swinging this 2-part pike around like a weapon, there will be a lot of stress at the join. It would be good to spread that stress out. Obtain pipe the diameter of the 2 poles. Iron pipe would be strong but harder to work. PVC would be light and easy to work but less strong. Copper is expensive but strong enough, easy to drill and ...


10

I'd use heavy studding, perhaps M20, M22 or even M24 (3/4-1" if you don't do metric). In one piece, insert it as far as you can drill (at least 20 cm I reckon), glued for the whole length with epoxy. The drilled hole should be a snug fit. The matching threaded inserts are much too short to be of any use. Instead you'll need to make one: Buy tube and tap ...


10

Both answers are great, but I wanted to note that you really should be adding a water-proofing solution to the door on a regular basis. As Criggie noted, covering the door would naturally limit how much water and it's exposed to, but the door will still get some water on it. Water is your enemy in wood because wood absorbs it like a sponge (go to a lumber ...


10

If not making new panels, make or purchase an H shaped moulding and set the panel halves into it. By eyeball (but measuring tape may say otherwise) the top panel parts might be pulled out and rotated to provide similar "tie-in" as a new panel would, with that new H shaped moulding running horizontally, if the sizes work out. Too late now, but had ...


9

How do professionals cut arcs? They don't use a saw to cut them. If you're the IKEA kind of professional, you have a monstrous milling machine. You program the arc into your CNC machine, and it just happens. If you're a carpenter, you rough-saw to the basic shape you want, plus a bit spare. Then you use a spokeshave, which is essentially a plane for curved ...


7

I think you need a threaded coupling that can be screwed into each end of the shaft. It's similar to what Ack recommends for pool cues but unfortunately cue joints won't have a 3" diameter. You can find this at your Home Center store and they're inexpensive and easy to install. Just drill the proper size hole in the end of each shaft and screw them in. The ...


7

I used an arm screwed to my router to cut a curve in a benchtop, it worked well. The same technique could be applied to a jigsaw. screw a wooden block to the side of your jigsaws foot screw an arm to the block coming off at 90 degrees to the cutting direction. mesure the radius you want from the blade along the arm and put a pin (nail) through it at that ...


7

Your jigsaw can do the job, but it's far too prone to wander for a perfect line. But you can rough cut it below the line and then use some sanding to get it to the line you want. I would buy a new blade for this and make sure it has a high tooth count and/or is listed for fine or scroll cuts (if you're a masochist, you can try with a metal cutting blade, but ...


6

It is called 10mm here, but the rule still applies - you drill for the advertised size of the bolt. Neither the hole, nor the bolt, nor the drill bit are exactly 10mm, but everything will fit. The only notable exception is when you drill in stone/concrete/masonry with a hammer drill. The hole gets +10% - +100% larger and you never know how much.


6

I think this is as close as you are going to get, because of the width of your face-frame:


6

Use a glue/wood mix to fill the hole and let it harden. Then you can drill it and use the existing screw as it should be used to hold the part in place.


6

One non-glue option that comes to mind is a threaded insert, specifically one suited for MDF. I did a quick search for "threaded insert for MDF" which returned many. One promising link is EZ-LOK Soft Wood Inserts as it references MDF among other types of wood. Two versions are noted in the linked page, providing a metal foundation for the removable ...


5

You drill holes to the advertised size of the bolt. So a 3/8" bolt gets a 3/8" hole. In your case, alignment may prove tricky. You may need to oversize a bit for that reason.


5

Adding an answer because I happened to see a video on this which has a thoughtful and detailed analysis of why wood cutting / carving with an angle grinder can be so dangerous. The video also has a "caught on video" moment of such an accident (no real gory details). IMO visualizing such an accident is very healthy mental preparation for this tool (or ...


5

If the issue is a flat place to put it, see Kyle B's answer. If the issue is squaring the individual parts into one of these frames, cast your mind back to geometry, and make the diagonals equal length (i.e. get the screws into a section but not completely tight. Measure the diagonals and nudge the frame until they are equal, then tighten the screws, and ...


5

I'd be cautious building something like this with limited woodworking experience. Typical framing like this would have 1/2" bolts and your rough sketch is similar to other stable gantries. I see this a lot in Florida where people have partially below grade hot tubes and need to raise them for drain and piping replacement. Renting a gantry seems to be ...


4

I like the hole to be snug on the threads, with these screws you don’t have a lot of shoulder so if the screw is a wood screw with the shank close to the screw head it is better to have the screw tight in the hole so the head won’t pull thru the hole of over sized. I was talking about the 4 wood screws that attach the brace not the single wood/machine screw/...


4

Use semi circular multi tool blades for longer jobs. You can then alternate the sides so that the blade will not overheat locally. It also helps if you have a second blade available. With my multitool from Bosh I can quickly change blades and let the blade cool off while using the other one.


4

The glue isn't curing Because it has no exposure to air. Effectively, you haven't applied it, just put it in a different bottle. The moisture of the stuff is softening the pine wood around it. You're lucky, too. If it had cured, you would not have gotten that screw out in a million years. You're really playing with fire on this one. Leave the ...


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