21

If you consider the physics of this, the B wedge is going to apply more outward force on the cleat attached to the wall then the A wedge for a given amount of weight supported. So you might cause the attachment to the wall to fail long before you would be reaching the capacity of the bolt's shear limit. Generally a relatively shallow angle will give you all ...


6

My imperfect grasp of physics would tell me that the strength would be equal in both cases, however, B is more likely to jam & be hard to remove later. The downward force is equal in both cases, the adhesion/grip force will be greater in B. There's potentially a leverage force also in B, but my high-school physics says that will be too small to come into ...


5

I don't know that the strength really lies in the angle. If I were picking, I'd go with X over Y, but because you don't want to create too much of a wedge between the cleat and the wall (Y will put more stress on the cleat fasteners). The bevel helps it not slide off the cleat. The main advantage of the cleat is you can mount a board to the wall in a secure ...


3

You only need enough angle that whatever is being held won't get inadvertently bumped off the wall. For heavy things, that's not much at all. For lighter ones, a bit more angle may be needed, but A is already excessive, IME. 15 degrees (or 75, if you prefer to think that way) is plenty. Strength comes from length first, thickness second, and width (height, ...


1

I had a similar problem in my basement (but our climate is mild not arctic, if it even matters) First inspect the floor to see if you have a water problem (through cracks or excessive water under the concrete) or whether the dampness is just from humidity due to porosity. If you are lucky, you can recognize water ingress by the mineral deposits which show as ...


1

The best place is for the vapor barrier to be is UNDER the concrete slab. This prevents moisture from the ground from seeping through the slab into the living space. Assuming that's not the case, then your next best choice is to apply a moisture channeling product on top of the slab. You don't want to use poly film here as that will cause moisture to ...


1

It's a balance between additional stress on the fasteners and the outward force from the torque applied by the weight of the object and its leverage, or distance out from the wall. Imagine a 12" wide shelf attached to a 6" vertical, forming a 2:1 lever arm. Place a 10 pound object at the outside edge of the shelf: this applies 10 pounds downward ...


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