6

24-gauge is 24-gauge. However, the the silver type round pipe is coated with a rather inexpensive galvanizing coating. This coating is to inhibit rust. The galvanizing keeps oxygen and moisture away from the raw metal.These elements will discolor the metal, causing the metal to oxidize and rust, thus shortening the life of the metal. Now for the down side ...


6

There are code requirements on this. NFPA 211 is the code section you probably are looking for. The stove will either be UL listed and certified and have specific clearance and hearth requirements mentioned in its installation manual or be unlisted. So when we consult the manual for the Vogelzang Cast Iron Pot Belly Stove, Model# PB65XL, this kind of leaps ...


4

Is there a safety reason for one or the other? A performance reason? Be sure to read any documents (instructions or user manual) that came with the doors (if they are a separate product) or stove (if the doors are built in to a product like a wood burner). Any safety instructions will be in those documents. As a manufacturer of glass for doors you should be ...


3

Code aside, the hottest thing in our living-room after the woodburner itself is the area directly above the wood-burner. I don't think this is a good place for any electronics, as most electronics generate heat of their own. Typically they dump these using heatsinks (large lumps of metal that quickly spread the heat over a wide area, like a radiator on a car ...


3

You're right, but only because oil is the worst, most expensive way to heat a home. Pretty much anything beats it, except maybe electric resistance in places with high electricity prices. Wood, gas, and heat pump electric will all beat the pants off oil. That said, even 80% efficiency may be optimistic for a modern high efficiency wood stove. But even if ...


3

Sounds like the flue pipe runs through your room. This pipe should definitely be insulated, not only for comfort, but for safety as well. Insulating the pipe keeps the heat in the pipe, preventing the buildup of creosote, which is a fire hazard. You will need to wrap that pipe with high-temperature insulation made specifically for that purpose. Do not use ...


3

It means what it says. If you go 10 feet from the chimney in any direction horizontally, you need to be at least 2 feet above the roof. Which means that your chimney is poorly located, if it's within 10 feet of a higher roof. So it needs to be 12 feet tall, if that's what it takes. Wind currents over that higher roof can cause downdrafts in the chimney - and ...


2

From the Vogelzang manual (pdf) available at the link you provided: Stove legs must set directly upon the solid-surface non-combustible floor as specified in this stove instruction manual. Hardwood is combustible.


2

The pipe on the interior of the house is called a connector. It can be double or single wall pipe. The advantages of using double-wall are closer clearances to combustibles, better drafting, and reduced creosote accumulation. As soon as the flue exits the room, be it wall or ceiling, there must be a thimble or ceiling support box that transitions from the ...


2

a heat pump has a cop or coefficient of performance. Your 48000 BTU Heat pump delivers that much heating nominally with mild temperatures outside.. To see how much power it uses you divide by COP and then convert to kWh. In my area natural gas is about half the cost of baseboard heating, and heat pump heat is half the cost of gas heat. In the winter it is ...


2

Best bet on the duct is that it's an outside air supply, so any air from it would go into the firebox, not out the front. Applying fans to fuel-burning appliances in ways not intended by the manufacturer can cause problems, up to and including death by carbon monoxide, or burning down your house.


2

The chimney should be uniform no chunks missing. Cleaning with a brush is not difficult but if it has not been inspected by someone that knows what to look for you can be taking risks. My current home passed inspection when I purchased it and the chimney was not lined with fire brick just flat field rock cemented together. Needless to say it was a huge fire ...


2

I think you'd have one heck of a time trying to get an 8" into that hole. Unless incredible care was taken with the inside joints, there's very likely some point where a bit of mortar is poking out that will block the liner, or an offset between blocks at a "slight bend" will, given only 1/4 inch of clearance.


2

Stoves designed for firebricks should have them. Stove metal can be corroded and burn through if incorrectly used. This can be caused by poor combustion due to wet wood or poor draught. As the OP needs more... I have bought and fitted 4 wood stoves (2 small and 1 cooking range which all came with firebricks as standard) and looked after several others, ...


2

That's overkill. All you need is a heat exchanger. It's vital to separate the system that can boil from the system that can't boil. PWR/VVER nuclear reactors have a similar heat exchanger separating the "must not boil" section from the "OK to boil" section. A gas water heater avoids the problem of boiling by simply regulating the gas ...


2

The video worked for me but I believe it is a thru bolt as you can see the head on the other side in one quick segment of the video. I have had similar issues with bolts in cast (the leg is cast iron) . I have never found any penetrating oil that will work for most of these cases. Heat is your friend here. Use a torch to get the metal red hot! Once the metal ...


1

At my last home one of the fireplace stove inserts had at least a dozen horizontal pipes that also had rock wool on top to baffle the heat going up, the hot air was injected low in the fire box to increase the efficiency it kind of sucked getting it started because of the baffle. Once it started the heat took all the smoke up and out. the baffle was part of ...


1

The installation manual requires 14” clear behind the stove to a combustible wall and 23” on each side. (It can be less if it’s non-combustible.) Here’s the installation instructions with installation details: https://www.usstove.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2018/10/1269e-use-and-care-manual-1.pdf Also, they indicate you should check with local codes ...


1

It almost certainly is in sections, but to get the first section out you'll have to get the T away from the wall. Asbestos putties were really common. That said you have a choice, pull it out and stay ignorant, or add probably $2000 to the removal cost to have a test and an abatement firm come out. The asbestos could have been in the clay pipe, but more ...


1

The Code says that the WOOD STOVE needs to be U.L. Listed and that listing will have “clearances” listed. (ICC Chapter 21, 2111.14.) I’d check with the manufacturer. If that’s not available I’d check with a similar sized unit.


1

The reason for single wall at the lower section is to improve the heat exchange. If you change to double or triple wall you won't have as much heat in the room but the pipe won't cool as much and will stay cleaner. If the support from the stove is solid no additional support should be needed as single wall is not as strong as double or triple wall.


1

I say they are both poor choices . Look for 13 Cr stainless steel , it is magnetic ( what modern auto exhaust systems are made with ).Second choice is thicker carbon steel , galvanizing makes little difference . Because a wood stove can get very hot, I greatly doubt that any paint available to the consumer will help. Zinc melts about 700 F and then forms ...


1

You cannot use HVAC ducting for a wood fireplace or stove exhaust. The stove/fireplace exhaust parts are typically triple-wall and are totally different in terms of their construction and connection methods. HVAC ducting is simple single wall sheet metal with leaky joints that you cover with foil tape. It's not an issue of galvanized vs painted.


1

Yes, just remove all the zinc galvanizing using a well vented media blast cabinet. You'll need to do that anyway to get paint to stick. Also check other vendors. Some people emotionally chain themselves to the local big-box store. They know this and stiff you on anything you're not likely to price check. I regularly catch them asking 3x what the thing ...


1

In the past I have used rock wool , some high efficient wood stoves use this in the fire box over the heat tubes so it can handle the heat. Pack enough to seal the flue. In my state a fresh air source is required for new stove installs, depending on the stove some times channeling through the chimney or coming in through an old ash clean out chute will work, ...


1

Spend the money to hire a licensed chimney sweep/inspector. If it costs extra for the inspection, pay it. Once you have someone who knows what they are doing look it over and make sure it's not going to burn your house down, then you can futz around with cleaning it yourself. But even a couple hundred bucks to get it inspected is nothing compared to even a ...


1

A lightning protection system is a building wide system. You don't just protect things individually. The ridgeline of your house would get air terminals and then if the antenna and chimney are within the "zone of influence" (lightning protection term) they would be bonded to the system. If your house is less than 50' tall and you are not in an extremely ...


1

It may be that this particular fireplace insert uses passive heating (through the upper and lower grates) to heat the room. From what I could see from your photo's is the flexible duct line in the back is how the unit acquires it's air source (that should be an intake to the unit). The lever as you described it's operation most likely is a damper which ...


1

Yes you will compromise the truss. Each pipe supplier, if not, the stove supplier should have the allowable amount of elbows and the distance it can be offset with the elbows. Although I have only seen this with the insulated pipe behind walls and with additional supports. What you need may not look the best, but if it is allowed, it will keep your truss ...


1

According to NFPA 211 Standard for Chimneys, Fireplaces, Vents, and Solid Fuel-Burning Appliances, you'll start with 36" clearance all the way around. Then you can use one of the methods described, to reduce the required clearance. Or you can follow the manufacturers installation instructions, which for a listed and labeled device supersede the ...


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