23

I take it for $700 you are paying people to do this work. And I gather these are garden variety handymen using random products bought at the local builder supply; when people say "polyurethane" without any qualifiers, they usually mean the Home Depot stuff. Have you talked to marine/boat painting places? There are a variety of products intended for ...


8

It's all about adhesion. When you recoat after 2 hours you get a chemical bond between layers. If you let it go longer than that, you need to wait 24 hours so it's hard enough to sand and get a mechanical bond. I sand before the final layer. That gets it smooth without danger of sanding through.


8

This is a beautiful door and it would be a huge shame to paint it. (And if/when the paint does start to crack, it will look far worse than it does now!) It should absolutely be able to withstand direct sunlight for years with proper finish. Contrary to what I think Harper's answer is saying, I may disagree in part. I have had very good results with "spar ...


7

After looking at your links, it appears you have purchased an unfinished wood top. It will need some sort of finish. You have a couple of choices, oil or a hard finish. Oil finishes on raw wood will help keep the surface from staining and make them repel water. Oils can often deepen the color or actually alter the color as it ages. Oils need to be reapplied ...


6

Since you'll be finishing the pieces in the building, lacquer is out. It stinks to high Heaven and unless you use a pre-catalized lacquer, it is prone to water stains such as condensation from a cold glass of water. I used to prefer oil based Polyurethane but that can have a strong odor too and that odor can last a while. For simple, tough, (not fancy) ...


5

Raw linseed oil does not harden. That is the fundamental difference between raw and boiled (often chemically treated rather than actually boiled, these days) linseed oil. It will be gummy for a very, very long time. You would probably want to remove as much of the surface oil as possible and re-oil with a hardening oil - boiled linseed, walnut, etc.


4

At 100 years old, there's a good chance that the finish on that piano is Shellac. The stuff can get sticky over time. As the linked article points out, the stuff is soluble in alcohol. I've use a cloth soaked in denatured ethanol to swab away sticky spots on a few of my hundred year old oak doors. Doing so gently, not scrubbing so hard so as to remove all ...


4

Wood won't clog sandpaper that fast, so it has to be the finish, dirt/soil or a combination of both. Paint thinner or mineral spirits usually work well to get dirt and grease off of wood, and wont harm most finishes you want to put overtop. 60 grit on a table top is a very coarse grit, and I would pretty much never use a grit that coarse on an already ...


3

After staining give a coat of clear finish, sanding it with a fine sandpaper (400G) to remove any raised grain or any dust that may have settled onto the drying finish. This will give you a good base to add your paint and the sanded surface will give it good adhesion. Steel wool has its purpose, but I would not use it here. That's only my opinion. My ...


3

Yes, by all means. You might want to test a spot (not for "will it work" - it will - but for any possible color issues.) As for what you have read, consider it an opinion, nothing more - if you like what you have, boiled linseed is just fine. Apart from some potential risk to tree nut allergy sufferers, walnut oil also works nicely and is a drying oil. ...


3

All exterior wood finishes that are "suitable for sun exposure" still slowly degrade in the sun (it's worse than water, actually) and need to be renewed - Just ask the folks with wooden boats. So whether or not the current finish is "weather resistant" (since "weather proof" is not really accurate) it will need to be renewed. The simplest approach is to re-...


3

As @bib says in his comment, the purpose of the finish is really dependent on what the wood is being used for. Most wood finishes will provided at least a little protection from drying and abrasion, but other than that it's really application specific. (By the way you use the word "varnish", which is a specific category of wood finishes, but there are many ...


3

Generally speaking, varnish makes the wood look pretty and shiny and protects it from water although the protection is not perfect. A much better explanation can be found in the book Understanding Wood Finishing by Bob Flexner. It has been through several editions so your local public library should have a copy. He debunks a lot of myths and is pretty ...


3

It seems like a new finish of any kind is going to be somewhat at odds with a weathered, distressed look. That said... A water based urethane finish should change the color less than an oil based one, but there will still be a change. A final coat of satin sheen finish over the initial coats might be simpler than the steel wool and less likely to change ...


3

Use a sanding block (ie, do not hand sand with your fingers) which will prevent the sandpaper from pressing into the grooves. 1 mm is huge, for anything reasonably described as fine sandpaper and not applied with excess enthusiasm. But, as is always the case, testing your complete proposed finishing process on a suitable piece of (in this case) laser-...


3

A "wipe on" polyurethane might get you most of the way there, depending upon how perfect you want to get it. Lightly sand the damaged area to make sure there are no sharp edges or rough spots. Then with a lint free cloth, wipe on some (it'll take a few coats) and see if you like it. If good enough, great, if not, and you really want it right, ...


3

Alaska Man's epoxy suggestion is what came to mind for me as well, but it might be difficult to get a nice edge without a lip of some sort. I admit that I've never worked with the stuff. I think I'd be ordering a sheet of 1/4" glass with a pencil edge. It would probably look great and wouldn't cost much. Wouldn't have to be tempered if you're careful ...


2

There is no substitute for sanding between each coat if you want the best finish. I get the best result building or refinishing furniture when I thin oil based urethane 3 parts urethane- 1 part mineral spirits for the first coat. Sand with 220 grit after first coat and wipe down with a tack cloth. Remove tack cloth residue with denatured alcohol on a cloth. ...


2

I hate to be critical of other contractors, but from the clues you have given in your question, I think I know what happened. First, pine is a much softer wood than oak and needs to be sanded very smooth before the first coat of urethane. The first coat raises the grain of the pine and almost always is somewhat rough regardless of how good the initial prep ...


2

UV light is actually probably a bigger concern than water. All but the most delicate finishes will provide decent water resistance, but UV light will break down anything not specifically designed for it. An exterior door should be finished with something outdoor-rated, like spar varnish. I'm not sure there's any way for you to tell by looking at it, but ...


2

Two part polyurethane is the way to go, Its food safe when hard, and the active hardener makes a really good hard surface. I also like the finish that these products add to the surface, and you typically could add about three layers to make it really bullet-proof. The stuff is a little bit expensive, but well worth the money!.


2

The wood will change color eventually no matter what you do. However, you can do two things to slow down that process. Use a water-based polyurethane finish. All other finishes are either slightly yellow going on, or themselves yellow with age. Keep the sun off the wood. Sunlight hastens the darkening process. A dark stain will mask the effect. The ...


2

If you want to "get rid of the shiny look" why would apply lacquer at all? Shiny is what lacquer does. If the only issue you have with the lacquer is that it's shiny, all you may need to do is rub the doors down with steel wool or Scotchbrite® (generically, non-woven abrasive pads) to take the shine off. But don't apply more lacquer if you don't want it to ...


2

The trick here is to actually have the lid start out as part of the box, so that the grain of the wood all runs right across the separation between box and lid. One way this can be accomplished is to build a solid "block", and then turn that into a box. You first cut off a "lid" off of the solid block, and then by one means or another, hollow out the ...


2

We just put two coats of a Varathane Floor Finish over a painted floor. It's Satin, and suitable for wood as well. It might be worth considering, because 1) we had zero color change (even over metallic and multi-tonal base) and 2) the satin actually looks flat on our floor.


2

A shop I worked at called this "burning the edge". I was the noob and they never stopped smiling when it happened to me. I was using toned lacquer, which was even more fragile. Short Answer: Sand near the edges by hand. Use a hard sanding block. Affix the sandpaper firmly. Go slow. The flat level pressure should smooth the top plane without touching the ...


2

Those questions are all interrelated ;) Whether mineral spirits are safe to use depends on the finish. Any sense of age? Since there's more than one, I'll assume it's factory made and guess a polyurethane finish, and as another guess not oil based since it doesn't appear to have any yellowing... put a drop of water on it. If it turns white it's waterborne. ...


2

Wood naturally changes color over time and it looks like your cedar material was no exception. When you sanded the material in some spots you sanded away the surface of the material that had changed color leaving more of the raw wood exposed. It will be a challenge to try to fix this in any easy way. Some things you could try: Do nothing and see if over ...


2

It really is going to be next to impossible to match up those various areas where you have tried the sanding and re-sanding. My recommendation, if the flooring material still has enough depth to the tongue and groove to permit more sanding, is to re-sand the whole floor uniformly. That may be best done by using a drum sander so as to get as even of surface ...


2

Such a wax exists... but before we use it how deep xare these gouges? If you took a fork and dragged it deeply across a finished tabletop you could/would fill the damage with colored beeswax. Deeper gouges would necessitate different fillers, colored shellac sticks heated and melted into the holes works well. Typically, however, if you're sanding off the ...


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