New answers tagged

3

Odds are excellent that you have an additional bare wire and cable sheath out of sight up the ceiling. And that your "yellow" wire is actually "White, but old and yellowed." This is a crappy install, in that the cable sheaths should have been coming all the way into the "old fixture as junction box" and if they don't make it to ...


2

They shouldn't be running either over or under roof tiles :) They should be running in the space underneath the roof structure, or get rerouted elsewhere.


5

There is no need for wire nuts in any such appliance, and this is a design from someone clueless, and made in a shop that makes stuff for US markets. Nothing sold in Europe should ever have wire nuts in it - it's a clear giveaway. Unless you modify it to have double insulation or be properly grounded, and get rid of all the other design mistakes - I'd not ...


4

Devices should be listed and approved by a recognized testing agency / authority, such as UL (Underwriter Laboratories). Anything that doesn't carry an approval rating by such an agency is potentially dangerous and should not be used. Some great answers point out what's wrong with the design of the lamp, but an easy way to always stay safe is, always look ...


2

That appears to be a very straightforward setup, with neutrals in the box. You may well lack grounds at that era. You could have had switch loops, but don't appear to in this box. Following normal procedures: Unswitched Line Power coming in on black to the hall switch, fed from the hall switch to the outdoor light switch. Switched power from hall switch out ...


50

It's dangerous. You've spotted one important flaw but it can combine with others to make a really dangerous product. I originally suspected it was made in Europe by someone with more interest/knowledge in the sculptural aspect than the electrical one, but I've since spotted contact details in China for the seller. Either way it shouldn't be sold. Here's why ...


24

The safety solution is to either add a grounding using a grounded cord with the ground branching off and attaching to the metal as close to where it enters as possible. Or you can convert the lamp to low voltage LED with the 220 to 5 or 12V conversion external to it so safety ground isn't a requirement.


2

Firstly when a plug or socket overheats you should replace BOTH the plug and the socket and also cut-back any heat-damaged wire. Heat damage can cause buildup of poorly conductive materials on contacts and it can cause loosening of the springs in socket contacts. This means that mating a heat-damaged connector with a good connector can cause the problem to ...


0

There’s a lot of questions here, just from these two pictures. But the main ones are How long are these cords? What are they plugged into? What rating is the extension cord? (When you bought it, you’d likely see 14/2 or 12/2. 10a 15a or 20a(amp) Is it on 24/7 in a controlled/covered environment or always out in the weather? It’s hard to say most definitely....


4

Chicago doesn't have ground wires. Everything in Chicago is in metal conduit with metal boxes. Those, together, provide the grounding system for everything. I mean, you're allowed to add ground wires if you really want to - belt and suspenders. Every junction box should have a screw hole that is pre-tapped #10-32 for a ground screw. (you can also add them ...


1

There is a defect in the hot side of that plug which is causing it to heat up. The defect may be in the plug or in the wire connected to it. The electrical resistance increased leading to overheating and damage. The same current flows through the neutral side and there is no damage there. This means the plug is not being overloaded. There is a defect in the ...


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