Hot answers tagged

286

PLIERS Used as pliers. Stripper 80 - 22/20 Strip 22-20 AWG (.8 mm) wire. 1.0 - 18 Strip 18 AWG (1.0 mm) wire. 1.3 - 16 Strip 16 AWG (1.3 mm) wire. 1.6 - 14 Strip 14 AWG (1.6 mm) wire. 2.0 - 12 Strip 12 AWG (2.0 mm) wire. 1.6 - 10 Strip 10 AWG (2.6 mm) wire. CUT Used to cut wires and cables. LOOP The loop hole is used to bend hooks in wires, so that the wire ...


85

The holes in the center are bolt cutters for metric bolts, the loop hole is to help you make loops in wire, see this link for an example of loop usage.


58

That chart is from BlueSea - they make marine DC power system components (mostly 12V and 24V). Voltage drop effects are completely different at 12V vs. the 240V used by this EV charger. Disregard that chart. Plugging the actual scenario (240V, 6AWG, 40A load, 150 feet) into a voltage drop calculation indicates that the worst possible voltage drop will be ...


51

It's dangerous. You've spotted one important flaw but it can combine with others to make a really dangerous product. I originally suspected it was made in Europe by someone with more interest/knowledge in the sculptural aspect than the electrical one, but I've since spotted contact details in China for the seller. Either way it shouldn't be sold. Here's why ...


35

That is a wired telephone junction block. The wire coming through the wall may very well be where the original land line entered the house from outside. The other wire is probably going off to some phone jack in another part of the house.


29

Given the colours (I don't know why the other answerer referred to a red wire, the wire in your picture is clearly brown) I'm going to assume you are somewhere in Europe. The insulation on the nominally live wire is gone, that means you more likely than not have 230V exposed (if you are in a country that cares about polairty you definately have 230V exposed,...


25

The safety solution is to either add a grounding using a grounded cord with the ground branching off and attaching to the metal as close to where it enters as possible. Or you can convert the lamp to low voltage LED with the 220 to 5 or 12V conversion external to it so safety ground isn't a requirement.


23

If a heater requires 8 AWG wire, it's because it requires more electricity than a smaller wire is capable of safely delivering. If you used the 12 AWG wire, first the 20A breaker would trip, but if that was upgraded (DO NOT) then the wire itself would turn into a heater and burn down the house. What I'm saying here is that when too much electricity is ...


22

Short: Yes - the wire is lethally dangerous It could kill somebody. It could cause a fire. Longer: If that is a mains power cable, as it seems to be, then that wire has the potential* to be fatally dangerous if touched when power is applied. Let's try that again This can easily kill somebody The lead could cause a fire - either by energy transfer from ...


21

Wiring diagram, though I hope you don't really need it: Don't forget to break the tabs off the hot side of the outlets.


21

If you are concerned about the presence of wiring near where you are installing this, grab yourself a stud finder with "live wire" detection from your local hardware store. Entry level models are inexpensive. This way, you can find the studs and the wires. More expensive models may also detect other services (e.g. metal plumbing or gas pipes). If you are ...


18

The Eaton catalog clearly says that the breaker can accept anything between and including #14 - #4 AWG. You should follow the instructions that tell you to use #10, as it will fit the breaker, and will be appropriate for the amps you are running.


16

Circuit wire is kept relatively large because general purpose receptacles are just that: general purpose. You can plug a nightlight into them one moment and a kilowatt hairdryer the next. In a fixture, luminaire, or appliance, on the other hand, the designers can use thinner wire (down to 18AWG for fixture wire as per NEC 402.6) as they know how much ...


15

That is a Heyco bushing. You need to squeeze, preferably with a needle-nose pliers, in what I would call a top-to-bottom position considering the orientation of how it is installed. If you squeeze just right it will come out no problem and will not damage the cord. Here is a decent video explanation: http://youtu.be/G1IWQB3mQrw Here is the manufacturer's ...


14

What you are doing is done all the time, and there is no problem with it, if done properly. The fact is these 3 prong receptacles still exists in many older homes, and there is no requirement to upgrade an entire circuit simply to plug in a device. If you go out and purchase a new electric dryer, the seller will ask if you have a 3 or 4 prong receptacle. ...


14

You so not want to do this. If you have a true 25A load then install the proper 30A or 40A single breaker and the proper wiring for that amperage (10AWG for 30A breaker or 8AWG for 40A breaker) in a single circuit to a listed receptacle rated for that current rating. Here are some of the problems that you have with what you propose: There is never any ...


14

Oh, that math is wrong! The chart is fatally flawed: it fails to state supply voltage. (It's probably 12/24V). For 240V circuits, I don't even bother to crunch the numbers until the run is 180' or more. But even if we're operating under the rules of the oppressive Canadian regime, #6 is good for 204 feet, eh? In fact, you can use #8 wire for 50A under ...


13

You haven't told us which country you live in, or what this wire connects to. (It makes a difference if it's say, a refrigerator or microwave oven, as opposed to a small room fan.) Still, if it's connected to your mains (115/230V) power, as others have mentioned, your friend was right: that wire's a serious accident waiting to happen. In addition to the ...


12

You're always allowed to use bigger wire The circuit ampacity defines the minimum wire size needed. If you have larger wire on hand, go ahead and use it. For instance I often run single appliance circuits that demand a 15A breaker. However, I stock 10 colors of #12. I don't stock #14 at all because it's a useless and redundant wire size for me, I'd ...


12

I've been in the industry for over 40 years and have never heard of asbestos in the old wiring insulation. It is oil-impregnated cloth I believe. The more pressing problems that I see from your photo are that the cloth insulation may start to crumble off the copper conductors when you manipulate the wires and that the junction box appears to be overfilled. ...


12

No, no, no... The breaker isn't saying it's for "14/2" Romex cable. It's saying the terminal is able to physically attach #14 through #2 wire. Whereas the 14/2 cable designation means it has #14 wire and 2 conductors (in house cable ground is counted separately, in cordage it is not). The ability to fit #14 or #12 is irrelevant to you, unless you are ...


11

I wouldn't worry too much. Modern electrical standards have wire stapled an inch and a bit back from the interior of the drywall. If your screws are less than 1.5" long, you shouldn't hit anything. If you are pre-drilling for drywall plugs, only go 5/8" in. It's ideal (and still safe) if you get one screw into a stud. There should be one either on the left ...


9

Speedy's answer is an excellent one. I here want to add a picture of what these clips look like in the raw so that it is more apparent how they work. The groves along the areas pointed to by the red lines are those that grip to the inside edge of the hole in the lamp base and retain the cord. When you squeeze the clip, as Speedy explains, the clip ...


9

Looks to me like a doorbell transformer.


9

You cannot use an electric tankless water heater in place of an electric tank without a significant upgrade in wiring and most probably adding new breakers to make a total of two or three breakers. Even new wiring of the proper size might not be enough because your electric service might not have enough capacity for a central electric tankless WH. What is ...


8

I'd agree with the comment that you may have another problem. What size is the conduit? Are you pulling or pushing (pulling is what works, pushing won't.) If you need something to pull with, use a shop-vac to get a rope through the conduit first. Braided hollow rope can be nice as you can expand the end and use it like a Chinese finger cuff to grab the ...


8

What you're looking for is a "push-in wire connector" that looks something like or . These don't require nearly the gymnastics required of twist-on type connectors, make a more secure connection over time, and aren't much more expensive either.


8

Traditional, aka "nobody ever got fired for recommending this" 1000 feet underground, split phase 120/240V service, 3 wires, this is the main service to the house (so we get a favorable 83% derate on NEC 310.15b7, so calculating for 83 amps). Your choices are 250 kcmil aluminum at 6.84% voltage drop, $3,300 400 kcmil aluminum at 4.88% voltage drop, ...


8

No, you have to clamp each wire individually.


8

Here is a catalog from Thomas & Betts, the makers of Marrette connectors. Pages 14-15 cover the black high-temperature wire nuts including the Model 33. The graph on Page 15 shows limits of "Min. 1 #18 + 1 #14 Max. 4 #14", so four 14AWG wires is exactly at the manufacturer's limit. There's also a detailed table at the end of the document (Model 33 is ...


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