Hot answers tagged

14

The reason why this is happening is the structural members are expanding and contracting with the temperature/humidity changes. There is no good solution to fix the issues, but you can cover it up. The quick and dirty solution would be to put up quarter round over the seams, and attach it to the studs only- That is not to the ceiling. This would allow for ...


13

Go out a door that's not blocked and walk to the blocked one to clear the snow. If all your doors are blocked go out a window and do the same. If it's a screen door, remove the screen and reach through the opening to move the snow. You can use a broom or even a pot or baking pan if your don't have a shovel within reach.


7

We're seeing here in action why backflow preventers (check valves) are mandated in various municipalities. Blue water sounds like someone was using one of those toilet cleaner tablets in the tank, the system lost pressure due to the freeze blockage and siphoned the toilet tank till the fill tube on the ballcock was exposed. Not something I'd want ...


6

In most cases, snow is not a solid substance. It is powder so it has a bit of movement. What you have to do it push the door a little bit open, and close it repeatably. From this you will hopefully be able to get your hand out the door to clear more snow. From that you can then open it even more. Repeat this process until you can fit a shovel out to ...


6

Here are some options: Use another door Go out a window so you can dig out the door Call someone who can come over and dig you out Hole up and wait for the snow to melt.


4

If you have no space in a garage or shed (like me) then outside is your only option. I use a 20'x20' plastic tarp tied around my four patio chairs and table on my deck. They've survived 6 Minnesota winters. After a big snowfall, sometimes I'll sweep the snow off if it accumulates.


4

Best advice is to dig the whole thing down to the level below frost line. It is also the standard practice to put down a bed of gravel at the bottom and lay in a reinforced concrete footing that lies completely below the frost line and is wider that the fence support wall. Say 12 inches wide. This gives the poured wall structure something solid to sit on ...


4

From the picture it seems that the walls were done and the ceiling last and trying to meet the walls. Normally (if done right) the drywall on the ceiling would rest on the drywall from your walls. In this case even if you had a lot of contraction throughout the year you would have a very minor crack at most (which could be fixed with plaster or even caulk)....


3

HVAC Open cold air returns Prep humidifier: Open intake, turn on water, set thermostat Change furnace filter Test furnace Electrical Shut off A/C circuit breaker If you have baseboard heaters, turn on any circuit breakers, test heaters Do you have a generator? Does it start? Do you have a plan to connect it if needed? Outside Clean out my garage so I ...


3

To keep water out of the door lock (knob type) in my gagrage, I split open a tennis ball ("x" cut) tied some twine to it, to attach it to the knob shaft, and put it over the knob. Works great.


3

Make an insulated, heated enclosure for the paint. Since the paint is already on a wire rack, just insulate the floor and enclose the bottom shelf of the rack. Use a lizard heater and a thermo-cube. Cut and notch OSB, rigid foam insulation and some scrap pegboard to fit on the floor below the shelf. Use scrap vinyl to make a serpentine channel on the ...


3

The general principle to use is that actual air leaks are a lot worse than just having poor insulation. Look around your doors, windows, plumbing, attic/basement/crawlspace access hatches, fireplace, and anywhere else where there's a hole in the wall. Anywhere you feel air movement is an issue. Anywhere you can see daylight (that's not glass) is an issue.


2

You can build a 2"x2" frame that's 1/2" smaller than the inside window opening, apply shrink insulation film to that and then use 3/8-1/2" foam backer rod to hold it in place in the window opening during winter. This makes a shrink-film internal storm window that's easily removed and if you're careful, just needs a touch-up with the heat gun next winter to ...


2

I doubt the snow is so compacted that you cannot open the door at all. You don't have a huge ice-cube out of your door. So, just open the door as much as you can and dig your path clean.


2

Based on the way the spring is oriented on the idler pulley B, my guess is that it's meant to pull downward on the belt when it's installed, so the belt probably goes like this: The exploded parts diagram in the owner manual (on the page you linked to) shows the belt in this same orientation: There might be a slot or hole in the idler pulley assembly that ...


2

I would go to the hardware store and get a roll of electrical heating strip/tape (could be named either one). We would use this up in Minnesota in our gutters and valleys to prevent icing. Wrap this around the frozen pipe for as long as it is exposed to you. That way the entire ice blockage is getting warmed up and not just a small section. Now that you know ...


2

I would only call a plumber if the purpose was to have the plumber reroute the lines to an interior wall where the pipes will not freeze. I can't see paying someone $100 an hour plus for holding a hair dryer or mini-blow torch next to a pipe to get it to thaw. Your plumber plumbs not perform magic. If your pipes are freezing to this extent though I ...


2

Ideally.. Turn the power/gas off to the water heater. Turn off the water to the building. Remove the water from the entire building, including the water heater, toilet tanks and water supply lines. Pour RV antifreeze into every waste trap, including the toilet bowls. The building is now winterized and your safe even if the heat goes off. If the heat goes ...


2

A condensing gas furnace needs to discharge it's condensate "waste" water. If the furnace is in an environment that experiences freezing temperatures, this can become difficult. Typical condensing gas furnaces don't have provisions to protect the condensate line against freezing temperatures, so the line can freeze up and break. This is one of the reasons ...


2

Longer overhangs could impact ice dam formation, but it does not seem to be a significant factor. As this page from the University of Minnesota outlines, heat loss through the roof is the big contributing factor. They even go further and say that air leakages around light fixtures and such on the ceiling of the top story are the biggest culprits. Nowhere on ...


2

I'm not a professional, and I have very little experience. But: Could you adjust the slope of your gutter? Currently, rain rolls north off the roof, gets to the gutter, half goes east and half goes west. If you lower the north-east corner of the gutter (and gently slope the whole gutter toward it) a majority of the rain would head down the east spout ...


2

We design heating cables into driveways and sidewalks for areas that can have an icy buildup and buildings that must have safe access, like medical clinics, hospitals, fire departments, etc. Also, high-end residents will often request it. Here’s a link for new or retrofit work: http://systems.warmquest.com/radiant-driveway-heating-systems/?gclid=...


2

My answer is old school but it has worked for me many times. Get a roll of that semi clear plastic and tape a piece to the entire inside window frame, basically sealing it. Any air leaking will either bow or suck in the plastic. you can then work on fixing any leaks and will know when you've succeeded because the plastic will quit moving. here is a link to ...


1

You get condensation because the windows (and evidently part of the ceiling, unless that's just a roof leak) are the most poorly insulated part of the building, so they cool below the dewpoint of the interior air. Bay windows are particularly bad as they are a fairly large expanse of window stuck out into the cold, and not infrequently the non-window parts ...


1

Just throw any insulation material you can get on your hands on the attic floor and cover it with "vapor-permeable film" (I don't know the correct term here) if it's not waterproof like styrofoam. Make sure the film is laid proper way up and won't move. Of course, this assuming that you won't be using this attic at all (not just "almost") - such insulation ...


1

I don't have an exhaustive answer, but off the top of my head, I would say don't turn off the heat entirely. You don't want frozen pipes, and refrigerators can be damaged if they are left running in freezing temps. If it were me, I'd probably leave the thermostat at about 10 C. I would also turn off the water entirely so that even if a pipe bursts, you ...


1

Make your doors smaller . The jamb stops for doors are usually jutted out a half inch or at the very least 3/8". There is no need for the door to be rubbing against the jamb that tight to where it would ever stick. I suggest the use of a small electric hand plane and shave off in 1/32" increments. You will need to remove the handle and the faceplate. ...


1

Most units are prehung. If the mortises on the jam and door look perfect and fit precisely, it is usually a prehung. Unless the situation is intolerable, I'd give it a while and let conditions change before making drastic changes to the door or hinge sets. I suspect possible settling or drastic humidity or temperature related expansion to the frame. You ...


1

The icicles are caused by heat escaping from your house, into the attic. This melts the snow on your roof causing icicles. It has nothing to do with your gutters. If you want to reduce or eliminate the icicles, the best thing you can do is add insulation to your attic and seal other means of air escaping (non-sealed recessed lights leak a lot of air). If ...


1

If you're not concerned about letting light through (in my neck of the woods it's dark when you leave for work and dark when you come home), you could also pick up some sheets of foam board rigid insulation and cut them to fit inside your window cavities. These most commonly come in 4'x8' sheets and many different materials (in order from best insulation ...


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