Hot answers tagged

14

The reason why this is happening is the structural members are expanding and contracting with the temperature/humidity changes. There is no good solution to fix the issues, but you can cover it up. The quick and dirty solution would be to put up quarter round over the seams, and attach it to the studs only- That is not to the ceiling. This would allow for ...


13

Go out a door that's not blocked and walk to the blocked one to clear the snow. If all your doors are blocked go out a window and do the same. If it's a screen door, remove the screen and reach through the opening to move the snow. You can use a broom or even a pot or baking pan if your don't have a shovel within reach.


10

Your plan is OK except that -20C is about the lowest you are going to get protection with NaCl (i.e. common salt). Here is a graph of freeze point vs. concentration. You really cannot get a higher concentration than about 23% since excess salt precipitates out. I think you'll be better off using an anti-freeze product.


7

We're seeing here in action why backflow preventers (check valves) are mandated in various municipalities. Blue water sounds like someone was using one of those toilet cleaner tablets in the tank, the system lost pressure due to the freeze blockage and siphoned the toilet tank till the fill tube on the ballcock was exposed. Not something I'd want ...


6

In most cases, snow is not a solid substance. It is powder so it has a bit of movement. What you have to do it push the door a little bit open, and close it repeatably. From this you will hopefully be able to get your hand out the door to clear more snow. From that you can then open it even more. Repeat this process until you can fit a shovel out to ...


6

Here are some options: Use another door Go out a window so you can dig out the door Call someone who can come over and dig you out Hole up and wait for the snow to melt.


4

From the picture it seems that the walls were done and the ceiling last and trying to meet the walls. Normally (if done right) the drywall on the ceiling would rest on the drywall from your walls. In this case even if you had a lot of contraction throughout the year you would have a very minor crack at most (which could be fixed with plaster or even caulk)....


4

Best advice is to dig the whole thing down to the level below frost line. It is also the standard practice to put down a bed of gravel at the bottom and lay in a reinforced concrete footing that lies completely below the frost line and is wider that the fence support wall. Say 12 inches wide. This gives the poured wall structure something solid to sit on ...


4

I would select non-flammable insulating materials such as rock-wool, or fiberglass (fully puffed up; mashing it badly hurts its performance). To use these, you will need some sort of framing to hold it up. It can't just be taped to a wall. It's not out of the question to frame a room inside a rental house; I've seen it done. However this is the wrong year ...


4

For your “with ducting”, it should not be an issue at all, since you have met the full requirements with ducting. For your “Without ducting”, in general you have met the condition, as the 300 cf room has an opening to a larger space, which meets the requirement. In your “worst-case” scenario, it would perform just like a normal electric hot water heater ...


3

To keep water out of the door lock (knob type) in my gagrage, I split open a tennis ball ("x" cut) tied some twine to it, to attach it to the knob shaft, and put it over the knob. Works great.


3

The general principle to use is that actual air leaks are a lot worse than just having poor insulation. Look around your doors, windows, plumbing, attic/basement/crawlspace access hatches, fireplace, and anywhere else where there's a hole in the wall. Anywhere you feel air movement is an issue. Anywhere you can see daylight (that's not glass) is an issue.


3

40°F is above freezing, so freezing shouldn't be a problem. If the weather is getting cold and you're concerned that this utility room might dip below the freezing point, prop the door open a bit to allow some heated air in. Also, since this is an apartment, talk to your landlord about your freezing concerns and ask him to address the issue - maybe adding ...


3

First of all you should turn off the water to the house and water heater . I've had a burst pipe at my vacation home because the power failed, it got really cold and froze pipes. When the power came back on and melted the frozen water in the pipes, there was a badly cracked pipe that did a ton of damage. If you have pex plumbing that doesn't apply, but if ...


3

How is a sump discharge normally set up in freezing climates? Short and wide, with plenty of slope, so that ice cannot build up in the bottom of the pipe. A 2" pipe to a 4" pipe with a fall to a gutter or ditch leading away from the house. Alternatively, completely below frost line to a dry well. What can I do in the short term Buy 350-450 feet of ...


2

Based on the way the spring is oriented on the idler pulley B, my guess is that it's meant to pull downward on the belt when it's installed, so the belt probably goes like this: The exploded parts diagram in the owner manual (on the page you linked to) shows the belt in this same orientation: There might be a slot or hole in the idler pulley assembly that ...


2

I would go to the hardware store and get a roll of electrical heating strip/tape (could be named either one). We would use this up in Minnesota in our gutters and valleys to prevent icing. Wrap this around the frozen pipe for as long as it is exposed to you. That way the entire ice blockage is getting warmed up and not just a small section. Now that you know ...


2

I would only call a plumber if the purpose was to have the plumber reroute the lines to an interior wall where the pipes will not freeze. I can't see paying someone $100 an hour plus for holding a hair dryer or mini-blow torch next to a pipe to get it to thaw. Your plumber plumbs not perform magic. If your pipes are freezing to this extent though I ...


2

Ideally.. Turn the power/gas off to the water heater. Turn off the water to the building. Remove the water from the entire building, including the water heater, toilet tanks and water supply lines. Pour RV antifreeze into every waste trap, including the toilet bowls. The building is now winterized and your safe even if the heat goes off. If the heat goes ...


2

I doubt the snow is so compacted that you cannot open the door at all. You don't have a huge ice-cube out of your door. So, just open the door as much as you can and dig your path clean.


2

A condensing gas furnace needs to discharge it's condensate "waste" water. If the furnace is in an environment that experiences freezing temperatures, this can become difficult. Typical condensing gas furnaces don't have provisions to protect the condensate line against freezing temperatures, so the line can freeze up and break. This is one of the reasons ...


2

Longer overhangs could impact ice dam formation, but it does not seem to be a significant factor. As this page from the University of Minnesota outlines, heat loss through the roof is the big contributing factor. They even go further and say that air leakages around light fixtures and such on the ceiling of the top story are the biggest culprits. Nowhere on ...


2

I'm not a professional, and I have very little experience. But: Could you adjust the slope of your gutter? Currently, rain rolls north off the roof, gets to the gutter, half goes east and half goes west. If you lower the north-east corner of the gutter (and gently slope the whole gutter toward it) a majority of the rain would head down the east spout ...


2

We design heating cables into driveways and sidewalks for areas that can have an icy buildup and buildings that must have safe access, like medical clinics, hospitals, fire departments, etc. Also, high-end residents will often request it. Here’s a link for new or retrofit work: http://systems.warmquest.com/radiant-driveway-heating-systems/?gclid=...


2

My answer is old school but it has worked for me many times. Get a roll of that semi clear plastic and tape a piece to the entire inside window frame, basically sealing it. Any air leaking will either bow or suck in the plastic. you can then work on fixing any leaks and will know when you've succeeded because the plastic will quit moving. here is a link to ...


2

Fit shutters, been “standard” on chalets in Switzerland for over 200 years. You could make the shutters perform even better by making them with an insulation layer as well. Fitted well that would start to get closer to the r value of the wall.


2

A humble solution I have seen in a temperate climate is to use whole mattresses in deep-set windows. Looks terrible but works well.


2

You'll be just fine sticking the tape to the wall outside the frame then sticking the plastic to that. There's a reasonable chance that there is cold air moving through gaps in the exterior trim, along the outside of the window casing, then through gaps in the interior trim. Applying plastic as you've suggested will help reduce this cold air movement. ...


2

Your best bet is to prevent the pipe from freezing in the first place. Once the pipes are frozen, a hair dryer will heat up a copper pipe slightly and that heat will travel down the pipe melting the outside of the ice column and breaking it free and it will travel down the pipe. To melt it completely would take hours. A propane torch would do it much faster ...


2

Actually, that answer is talking about condensation on the inside of the window, between the glass and the fiberglass insulation. But you didn't put up fiberglass insulation, which leaves an air gap next to the window. This is where the condensation happens. On the other hand, you put up insulating film which sticks directly to the glass without an air gap. ...


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