5

The frames for the glass are the least of your worries as they are removable. You could attempt some sort of patchup job with bondo and paint, but it wouldn't remove the problems that caused the rot and it would be very difficult to actually bond to partially rotted wood. Your goal would be to cut out all the rotted wood, reinforce the structure if ...


3

Your problem is that light bounces. White looking surfaces reflect a broad spectrum of light, and even black looking surfaces can reflect substantial amounts if smooth/shiny. You can see from the lighting on the frame in your picture that some of the light hitting the inside of the frame is actually reflection off the blackout curtains. To prevent the ...


2

Lots of good information above. Here's a slightly different view on the matter. (Professional carpenter here; have built traditional windows/doors.) First, you've gotten a quote that seems high for replacement. That might be the real price for the quality of product you want, or you might have found the most expensive distributor in the town. Get a couple ...


2

If the look you want is modern trimless, be careful on how you remove the jamb extensions. It looks like the window jamb may go over the wood jamb extensions. You will not need to add drywall to the returns. Add plywood instead, this way you can add 3/4" 1/2" or 1/4" where needed and add shims if things are at an angle. Then add your corner ...


1

Since these blinds will be mounted inside the frame, the attachments will probably be from the top of the frame. Toggle bolts would normally be my first choice but they need a large hole and about an inch of "free" space after passing through the 1/2" frame. If you have this space, go with toggle bolts. If you're a handy person, a better ...


1

I have two things for you... First if you have corners cracking: I take out as much of the old mud as possible, scraping down to corner tape/metal. Put a thick bead of caulk in the corner make sure it has smooth edges. Joint compound over it. Works 80-90% of the time. Second if you have a mess of issues like your picture: I would scrape back more of ...


1

This is one of those rare cases where I'd use fiberglass mesh tape, and I'd also use setting-type compound like Easy Sand 45. Together they'll make about as strong a joint as you can get with conventional drywall materials. First clean away any loose material down to bare metal/paper (if possible). Give the new compound a fighting chance of a good grab.


1

So if I understood correctly the water enters between the sill and the master frame. Why not seal it with silicone and this tool (don't know the word in English)? Use plumbing silicone or other silicone used for moist environments. Place the silicone generously and detract it with the tool shown. This should seal it thoroughly.


1

This could be an easy fix or a time-consuming one - but worth a shot. With a vinyl window casing I would carefully remove the window trim at the top. That will enable you to see what you're dealing with. If there is a gap in the middle between the window casing and the header you should be able to close it up with a couple of brads. However, The window is ...


1

I would insert the spacer as you suggest, and then re-trim the front. Sanding 1/4in is a lot of work. It seems that the casing trim is straight, but the window box is curved. You can get small trims (e.g. pine stop molding) which you could mount to the front face of the box, butting it against the existing casing and against or even in front of the top of ...


1

Pretty much just normal shrinkage in winter as things dry out, possibly aggravated by using damp wood or not running A/C in the hot/wet summertime - so if replaced/installed/painted before you moved in in the summer, it would be swelled up, and as you run heat and indoor humidity falls in the winter, the wood shrinks. Personally I'd suggest waiting through a ...


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