Hot answers tagged

14

I have two suggestions that seem, to me, to be very simple: Walk to the mailbox to check for mail. Very few people get enough exercise, so a few extra laps will, most likely, be beneficial. Of course, your dad may not get around very well these days, so that may be very impractical, which leads me to... Check once, later in the day, after the latest time ...


12

The simplest option is usually the best. High tech solutions won't easily work here - you could put a wifi extender on your garage that would halve the distance of the wifi signal, but that would still involve cost and effort of engineering a motion detector or some other kind of signalling device and a way of communicating that to the house owner. I'd ...


10

This driveway alert is what I use. Put the sensor in the box, and it will beep when the mail carrier opens the door. My mailbox is 600 feet away.


9

There's a very simple, non-electronic solution to this. A large, typically spring-loaded (could also be gravity/counterweighted) flap or flag, (can't make the mailbox too hard to open or you violate postal regulations) which pops up, or out, or down (depending how it's mounted) when the door of the mailbox is opened. This is different from the "carrier ...


6

There are rf-solutions that have further range than wifi though at lower bandwidth (not an issue for a yes/no issue like yours). For example LoRa, individual modules are available that you could work with. This way whatever method you use for detecting mail can then be sent over the air to your receiver.


5

It can work. It works much better if there are no obstructions in the beam path - using a reflector or other beam-concentrating antenna does not make "the problems with trees and buildings in the way" go away. I have played around with this just using a stainless steel bowl as a crude reflector. For actual deployments, I use real antennas built ...


5

Maybe, but there are lots of details about digital signal processing that are more complicated than just using a reflector. Luckily, one of them is a simple off-the-shelf solution: your antenna. Most consumer wifi equipment uses an omni-directional antenna, so it can receive and send in any direction. For a fixed power you can imagine that some of your ...


3

If I personally were to take on this challenge, I would put a microcontroller with LoRa in the mailbox (something like https://www.adafruit.com/product/3403 combined with https://www.adafruit.com/product/3231, with an antenna that extends outside the mailbox, through a little hole in the back, perhaps). The setup would be powered by a solar cell that ...


3

It depends on how DIY you are. You could put an optical sensor in the mailbox to detect when the door is opened (or a mechanical switch, or a tilt-sensor on the door) that trips a latch circuit or relay to turn on a light on the back of the mailbox. Battery/solar powered. A simple Google search showed lots of products and plans for building something similar ...


3

Send this switch back This is cheap Cheese junk dumped onto your shores, illegal and unsafe for its purpose, and the seller knew that and took your money nonetheless. Send it back. The various logos on it are the ones they stick on all their fakes. None represent a real testing lab. The fact is the switch will cause safety problems, and if anything else ...


2

That appears to be a very straightforward setup, with neutrals in the box. You may well lack grounds at that era. You could have had switch loops, but don't appear to in this box. Following normal procedures: Unswitched Line Power coming in on black to the hall switch, fed from the hall switch to the outdoor light switch. Switched power from hall switch out ...


2

I remember this sound from my youth; about once or twice a second. It is either a tape recorder or player problem. This can be proved by running the machine elsewhere - the clicking will happen wherever the machine is, so proving the smart meter is not the problem. A forum about tape deck problems is shown below. I hope you find a solution. As many people ...


2

Other than the pesky but unknown question of "exactly which type is it" coaxial cable has not really changed much in 50 years. If it's not defective, it will probably work. Otherwise, it's 50 feet, replace it, or let the provider replace it. Most providers will allow you to try a new service speed and decline if it does not work for you at the ...


2

Perhaps you can extend the wifi range cheaply, by using a cantenna, which you can very likely construct yourself. Set it up on the mailbox end, connected to the wifi camera and aimed at your house, and it quite likely will be able to reach.


2

I had exactly the same problem. First I fixed a big arrow to the box, which the postie flicked the opposite way when putting stuff in the box. That meant I could see it from just outside the house, from a distance - no need to go to the box. Then, I bought a remote bellpush which is now fixed, under a waterproof cover, to the box. The sounding part is ...


2

50 metres is well within the range of wired ethernet which when done properly can do 100 metres, and I've pushed it to 120 metres once. Since your mailbox probably lacks power, you can run a POE injector in the house, which will make -48V DC available at the other end. There are single port injectors, or POE can be done by an ethernet switch with the ...


2

The Wyze outdoor camera comes with a wifi repeater as well as an rechargable battery powered wifi camera. It is $40. The base station would live in the garage and hook up either to fixed ethernet or to the office wifi. The camera would be placed in or around the the mailbox. It is motion triggered, and needs to be recharged every few months. Motion on the ...


1

You are correct Based on the wiring diagram and provided photo, you appear to be correct that terminal 5 on your air handler's control block is your C terminal. So, go ahead and run your new thermostat cable, using that as C while matching the existing wiring for the remaining connections.


1

What are the safety issues here? You have several issues that worry me: your lack of experience with both electrical and steam boilers the lack of a circuit diagram or a reasonable ability to create one from the spaghetti in that junction box. A link was provided in one of the comments but there is no certainty your system followed the diagram in that ...


1

You have a two-transformer system most likely From the way your existing thermostat is wired, you most likely indeed have a two-transformer system. This means that you will need a 3rd gen Nest, since the Nest E dropped two-transformer support, and the 2020 edition Nest supports the same physical connections as the Nest E.


1

Based on the info and photos so far I'm going to take a (possibly premature) stab at a concise answer. Don't touch the power cables. You can totally avoid having anything to do with 240V circuitry and achieve the safe and non-invasive solution you want. Get a 5V relay board like the red one in your initial Question. A 2-channel one, not a 4-channel one. ...


1

The four diagrams in your question from other vendors are for units that employ a 240V selector switch as a control. Judging by the manual for your unit in your question, your unit does not have such a switch! Also, unlike the other vendors in your question, your unit does not have a remote so my comments about that are irrelevant. You seem to have a ...


1

Yes it can easily double the signal and it costs you nothing but a little of your time so give it a try.


1

This answer is based on the fact that they considered a WiFi camera but decided against it due to the cost of a repeater. To me this implies you're able to afford and run a WiFi camera at the mailbox. You can very cheaply make a parabolic antenna and point it to the house where the WiFi is. This may help improve the signal. There is a guide here but the ...


1

In my experience, where there are problems with old coax for new internet, it isn't the cable itself causing the problems but rather the connectors, splitters and other "stuff". But the end result is that if it worked for 200 Meg. it will very likely work for 400 Meg. Where I see problems, they generally happen at much slower speeds, so since you ...


1

There is a dead band set point in the thermostat This set point may heat for several degrees above the set point and not turn on until several degrees below. The dead band saves you $ because starting a furnace and heating / or cooling the duct work takes energy, so fewer starts and stops an hour end up saving $. where more on off cycles costing much more. ...


1

This should work just fine, and gives you the advantage, if setup properly, of mostly separating the two networks. The key is that (typically) a router will have one "in" port and four "out" ports. Your router should have one of the "out" ports from your friend's router go into the "in" port on your router. The one ...


1

What gave you the idea that the white wire should be connected to the L terminal? The constant-hot (L line) is the wire that was jumpered to all three switches in your original installation. It is red. Connect it to the L terminal of your smart switch. The other three wires -- one white and two red -- are the individual lamp wires. Connect them to the L1, ...


1

You are using a smart switch designed for a completely different application than your original switch. This kind of thing would never fly in a million years in the States - no ground present anywhere, and plastic that will age-embrittle. Your original switch setup is pretty basic - you have a hot coming into the left hand switch and that hot is daisy ...


1

Assuming you don't have conduit for the network wires, use the wires you have until it hurts, and then face the pain of getting new wires in. If it never hurts enough for that, you get lucky. If you have conduit, the game changes. Which is why some of us strongly suggest conduit for networking. But ripping the walls open for new wire when the wire you have ...


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